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10 BEST WINDOWS FAX PROGRAMS 



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POWERTOOLS 

BUILT-IN FEATURES THAT CAN 
SUPERCHARGE YOUR DESKTOP 

MAKE WINDOWS SING! 

EXPERT'S GUIDE 10 
SOUND CARDS, 
SPEAKERS, "" 
AND MO 



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GOLF COURSE DESIGN 

BUS BASICS AND BEYOND 

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CITIZEN" 



Your >5otebook Printing Pavmer. 



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: 1993 Cilizen Amewa Corporation. Cittsn Amera Corporalon. Oim logo, The CiMen Noleboo^lnnWf II and Savice Select Program are registefed iradenarts of Ctew Amerea CaporaJon. 



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The Citizen 

Notebook Printer II. 

It works wheie 

you work. 





When we say Citizen works where you worl<, we mean it. On your desktop or on the road, the 
Notebook Printer II is the perfect companion to your PC. With its built-in, 5-page sheet feeder or optional 
30-page sheet feeder, you'll get laser-quality text and graphics wherever your work takes you. You'll also get 
h\o pages per minute output and Special-Image Color. All for a surprisingly low price. 

Think of it. Now you can use your printer at your desk or in just about any location, use color when you 
need it, and produce professional-looking results. The Notebook Printer II really is the perfect PC companion. 

And all Citizen printers come with Citizen's exclusive Service Select Program'". For more information on the 
printer that works where you work, call 1-8004-PRINTERS for a Citizen Notebook Printer II dealer near you. 



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VOLUME 15, NO. 1 1 , ISSUE 158 



NOVEMBER 1993 



FEATURES 
12 

BUILT-IN WINDOWS POWER 
TOOLS 

By Robert Bixby 

An alphabet soup of 

extraordinary 

features comes packaged 

with Windows. 

But what do they 

do, and 

how can you put 

them to use? 

20 

TEST UB 

Edited by Mike Hudnall 

Reviews by 

Richard C. Leinecker 

Get the facts 

on Windows fax programs. 

with head-to-head reviews of 

the ten best. 

68 

INFINITE EXPANSION 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

The hottest news in 

connputers is arriving by bus. 

What's new inside the 

computer is the way 

peripherals are connected to 

the CPU. 

102 

PRCffiUCTIVITY CHOICE 

By Tom Campbell 

PC Tools for Windows from 

Central Point Software. Is it 

the best set of Windows 

utilities to date? 



COLUMNS 
10 

EDITORIAL LICENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 

Our new Multimedia PC 

section plus more about 

COfvlPUTE on America 

Online, 




Co'jer photo by Mark Wagoner ot ALR Evolution IV, 
running Turtle Tools for Multimedia from Turtle Beach Systems. 



46 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Jill Champion Booth 

Virtual reality 

for kids, IBM's new 

Plug 'n Run 

speakers, big-screen 

game playing, 

and more. 

49 

FEEDBACK 

Facts about fast cache, 

parallel and 

serial ports demystified, 

lotto basics, 

and more answers to 

tough questions. 



54 

JNTRODOS 

By lony Roberts 
DOS 6's Defrag command. 

56 

WINDOWS WORKSHOP 

By Clifton Karnes 

RoboHELP 2.0 makes 

creating Windows Help files 

a snap. 

58 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 

Spreadsheet 

programming with 

di-ogix. 



60 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard C. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 

64 

HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 
How many heads, cylinders, 

and sectors does your 
hard disk have? If you ever 

lose your setup, 
you'll need to find out quick. 

104 

PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 

By William Harrel 

Laser printer 

resolution: Just when 

you think an 

industry standard has 

been set, somebody 

moves the mark. 

106 

ART WORKS 

By Robert Bixby 

A look at some interesting, 

low-cost graphics 

and desktop publishing 

software, 

178 

NEWS BITS 

By Jill Champion Booth 
Faxing hits home, 

three trends, electronic 

Chagall, software 

stock sags, and an 

unusual online service. 



MULTIMEDIA PC 

77 

FAST FORWARD 

By David English 
The MFC Level 2 standard 

means more powerful 

multimedia applications are 

on the way. 

Continued on page 8. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0194-357X) is published monthly in the Uniiec! Sates and Canada by COMPUTE PuOiicalions Iniernatona Lid . 1965 Broadvsy, New York, NY 10023-5965, Volume 15. 
Number 11. Issue 156. Copyright © 1993 by COMPUTE Publicalions Iniernatona! Ltd AH nghts reserved COMPUTE is a regislerefl Irademark o; COMPUTE Publications International Ltd 
Distributed 'worldwide [except Australia and the UK) by Curtis Circulation Cornpany. P.O. Box 9102. Pennsauken. NJ D8109 Distributed in Australia by The Horwitz Group, PO Box 306. 
Carrmeray NSW 2062 Australia and in tne UK by Northern and Shell PC. PO Box 381. MillhartMur. London E149TW. Second-class postage paid at t^JewYork, NY, and at additional mailing 
oflices. POSTMASTER; Send address chariges to COMPUTE Magazine, PO, Box 3245, Harlan. lA 51537-3041 Tel. (800) 727-6937. Enlife contents copyrighiod All rights reserved 
Nothing may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Subscriptions: US, AFO - $19,94 one year; Canada and elSGwhoro -$25.94 one year Single 
copies S2.95 in US. The publisher disclaims all responsibility to return unsolicited matter, and all rights in portions published thereof remain (he sole properly of COMPUTE Publications 
International Ltd . Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors become the property of the magazine Editorial off ices are located at 324 w. Wendover Ave. , Ste, 200. Greensboro. NG 27408. 
Tel, (919) 275-9309. 

Printed in the USA by R. R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. #R126607415 

2 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Congratulations. 
You've Just Set Up 

A Computer 

That Can Edit Your 

Novel, Balance 

Your Checkbook, 

And Beat You At 

Solitaire. 

(What Would You Like To Do Next?) 



Before you become mesmerized with \\ hat With Presario, it only takes around seven 

the new all-in-one Compaq Presario can do, minutes to take it out and plug it in (cig^ht if 
let's talk about some of the traditional com- there's packing tape). It comes already loaded 
puter things you won't be doing. Like sweat- with five different software programs—plus 

ing your way through manuals and messing step-by-step Compaq learning tools— to help 

with cables. Memorizing weird commands you get started. That way you can get on to 

and all the other stuff that makes you feel a lot more meaningful things. 

like the computer engineer ^m^^^^rm^m ^m ^^^'^ counting all of the 

you never wanted to be. ^m%Mm MmjT^^^ money you just saved. 



/ 




\ The aymputer thtii's more than 
\just Lt computer. With AtaxFax. 
■^'ou cdii send and receive Jhxes 
rijjhtjwmjoui computer. 



There's no reoion to spend u 
jhnut}c huviP^ softMare. With 
PTS:Window\y0rk'i all of the 
biisici are already included. 






Prodigy- iets vou make all your 
own Iravei iirninffemems, cheek 
the ivetit her forecast y or get up- 
to-lhe-minutejinunciai nevs. 



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* M E (tJC * 

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iVilh America Online, you CitJt 
check the lutcis neui, ibop, or 
explore ibc hundreds ofjifjerem 
services thai tire available. 






It Can Answer Your 
It Can Even Answer Y 



"Hi. You've reached Sally 

and Dean. We can't come to 

the computer right now, so 

leave a message after jou 
hear the beep ..." 




RlcgD rctpjtercti U.S. PiiisJil Mtd 
Idc. The lct^I Imide Loja I* * r^tftfiwl fritejiirt of fiitel Cat 






Questions. 
OUR Phone. 




,n 



iTel 



iw 



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With Compaq learning tools, 
and ourjiee 24-hour hotline 
and 3-jcar warranty, you gel 
all the support you need. 



The Presario 4€0 is so much more persona! 
than most personal computers. Case in 
point. The built-in answering machine ac- 
tually gives everyone you Uve with their 
own Personal Message Center. So it re- 
cords vour voice. And Sally's. 
And Dean's. And so on. 
Plus, there's a built-in fax 
(eliminating one more ugly 
black box from your personal space). 

Most personal of aD is the way Presario 
answers your questions. Quickly, directly 
and in plain English. (Remember when 
you needed help just to find the Help com- 
mand?) With Presario, we want you to be 
able to do everything with your computer. 

Except waste a lot of time just figuring 
out how to use it. 

For more information on Presario, or 
for a location nearby where you can get a 
closer look, just call 1-800-345-1518. 



COMPAQ 



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Circle Reader Service Number 209 



cannpuTE 



VOLUME 15, NO, 1 1 . ISSUE 158 



NOVEMBER 1993 



78 

OPEN WINDOWS TO SOUND 

By David English 
With a sound card, a pair of 

speal<ers, and the right 

software, you're on the way 

to multimedia. 

86 

NEW MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTS 

Edited by Lisa Young 

and Phillip Morgan 

The hottest new apps and 

the coolest new hardware. 

100 

MULTIMEDIA SPOTLIGHT 

By Clayton Walnum 

PC Karaoke from Sirius 

Publishing and Soft Karaoke 

from Tune 1000. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
108 

DISCOVERY CHOICE 

By Clayton Walnum 

Where in Space is Carmen 

Sandiego? from 

Braderbund. 

112 

GAME INSIDER 

By Shay Addams 

A look at the hottest new 

games and Spectrum 

HoloByte's merger with 

IVIicroProse. 

114 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By Scoti A. May 

Inca from Coktel Vision/ 

Sierra. 

116 

GAMEPLAY 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

What's new on the wild 

frontier? Pharmacy? A[ Lowe 

talks about Freddy Pharkas. 




Computer illustrations for the new 
Multimedia PC section by Rob Sc/ius/er 



New in this issue of COMPUTE is f/ie first instaliment of a 

regular special section on multimedia, called 
Multimedia PC. To get started with our new Multimedia PC 

section, first turn to "Fast Forward" on page 77 for 
a took at the hot-off-the-press MPC Level 2 standard and an 

explanation of what it means to you. Then flip over to 
page 78 for our feature, "Open Windows to Sound, " and get 

the scoop on just what's involved in adding sonic 
splendor to Windows. Next, take a look at "New Multimedia 

Products" on page 86 for info on leading-edge 
multimedia hardware and software. And finally, turn to page 

100 for "Multimedia Spotlight," which tells you 
how to turn your multimedia PC into a Karaoke machine. 

So buckle your seat belts, turn to the 
Multimedia PC section, and crank up the volume on your PC. 



118 

THE GREENING OF AMERICA 

By Richard O. Mann 
and Ramona R. Mann • 
Building a virtual golf course 
that feels like the real thing is 

all work and ali play. 



REVIEWS 

126 

ALR Evolution IV MPC, 

Cyrix Cx486DRx2, 

Wing Commander 

Academy, 

Syndicate, 

Home Medical Advisor 

Correction, 

Panasonic KX-P2023, 

National Lampoon's Chess 

Maniac 5 Billion and 1, 

Battle Chess 4000, 

Kiplinger's CA-Simply 

Money, 

Stylus 800, 

Thunder Board, 

Michael Jordan in Flight, 

The Oregon Trail, 

A Place for My Stuff, 

ComputerWorks, 

Visio, 

Sherlock. 

Mystery at the Museums, 

V for Victory: Market 

Garden, 

Tony La Russa Baseball II, 

Lost Secret of the 

Rainforest. 

War in the Gulf, 

and LabelWriter II Plus. 



COMMODORE 64 AND 128 USERS 

Learn how to program the 
SID chip, add a RAM drive to 
your system, and more. Turn 

to the section foilowing 

page 122 for great articles, 

programs, and tips. 

ADVERTISERS INDEX 

See page 155. 



EDITORIAL Ediicr: Ciirton Karnes; Ar! Di-ector Ro= t C Cass Maiaging tailor: David Enghsn, Features Ecli:or. Roterl Bixtiy; Reviews Edilor. Wke HLfl-ial . GazeKe EQiior: Tom Neisel; 
Entertainnenl Edi'or: Denny Atliin: Senio' Ccoi; Edic Karei Hu'lTvan Copy Edilor: Maigarst Ramsey Ediloriai Assistant: Poliy Ciiipam, Contributing Ed.tors Syivia Giaham, Eddie Huffiran, Tony 
Roberis, Ks-en Sepak: Interns: Phillip Mcrgan. Lisa Vo^rg, ART: Assistant An Direcior. Kenneth A Hafdy: Designer: Katie Murdocli: Copy Production Manager: Terry Casr: PRODUCTION: 
Produclion Manager De Potter. Traffic Manager Barbara A. Williams. PROGRAMMING & ONLINE SERVICES Manager Troy Tucker; Programmers: Bruce M Bovioen, Sieve Diaoer, Bradiey M. 
Smail; COMPUTE ADMIMISTRATION' President, COO- Katny Keeton, Execuln/e Vice President, Operalons: William Tynan, Editorial Director Keith Ferrell; Operations Manager: Cauid Hens'ey Jr.; 
Olfice Manager Sybil Agee; Sr Admimstfative Assistant: Julia Fleming; Administrative Assistant. Usa G. Casmger; Receptionist: LoWanda Fox. GMI ADMINISTRATION: Sr VP CFO: Pairicit j! 
Gavin; EVP/Corporate Services: Jen Winston; VP Director Sales Promotions: Beverly Greiper. Dir, Nev^sstand Circulation: Paul Roinick; Dir,. Newssland Operations: Joe Gallo: Dir. Subscription 
Circulation Beatrice J Hanks: VP Director of Research: Robert Rattner; Advertising Production D:reclor: Chariene Smith; Traffic Dir,: William Harbutt; Drr., Budget and Finance: Tom Maley; FVo- 
duction M9r.:Toni Stmson: Asst. Froduction Mgr.. I^Jancy Rice; Mgr.. Internaiional Div George Pjojas; Exec. Asst. toBobGuccione Diane OConnell; Special Ass!. to Bob Guccione: Jane Horalish. 



8 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



HOW TO BUY A 

DOUBLE-SPEED CD-ROM. . . 

WITHOUT GETTING 

TAKEN FOR A DRIVE. 

Introducing Creative OmniCD. 

If you've been thinking about adding the power and excitement of an internal CD-ROM to your PC, here's some great 
news: thanks to our exclusive Creative Double-Speed Technology;" double-speed CD-ROM perfonmnce is 
now available at about tlie same price you'd expect to pay for a single-speed drive. 

And we're not talking about just any CD-ROM here. This is a full-featured, MFC 2 compliant, 
XA-ready, 300KB/second, multi-session photo CD drive vrith a blistering fast 320ms access time: 
The all-new Creative OmniCD." 




CREATIVE 



PHONES VOL. BUSY 



® C^ 



WORKS WITH ANY SOUND CARD. 

Of course Creative OmniCD works with your 
Sound Blaster— after all, it is the industry standard 
for PC audio. But what if you've already got 
another sound card? 

No problem. Because Creative OmniCD 
loorks perfectly with just about every major brand of 
audio card. . .or even without a sound card for applications that don't use audio. 

Best of all, Creative OmniCD opens up a whole new world of CD-ROM applications. Like photo CD— ive've even 
included Aldus' Photostyler'SE image enhancing software right in the box. And also games, 
^HJJwN^'H multimedia and business applications, education, and more. 
^^^5^15 ■ THE BOTTOM LINE: A LOT MORE DRIVE, A LOT LESS MONEY. 

Sure, there's plenty of other manufacturers offering double-speed CD-ROM drives. But as part of a 
complete package u'ith an SRP of less than four hundred dollars?' Now that's Creative. 
For more information and the name of your nearest Creative Labs dealer, call 1 -800-998-5227. 

Soundl CRU TIVE 






BLASTER 



CREATIVE i.AB5, INC, 



QySJUB^ CCDp>Tight]9q3CrMfiv-cT«hr»bgjLW.&*am-eEiTijhU!-%i«dTiKSw^ 

Circle Reader Service Number 125 



EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 



Multimedia and 
networking 

are in our future 
and yours. 



COMPUTE'S been a pio- 
neer in multimedia since 
day one. In fact, way 
back in July 1991, we 
started the first monthly com- 
puter magazine column we 
know of devoted to multime- 
dia. Since then we've regular- 
ly covered multimedia in fea- 
tures, Test Labs, and reviews. 
This month marks another 
milestone in our multimedia 
coverage. Starting with this is- 
sue, we're including a special 
section called Multimedia PC 
in each issue. In this section, 
you'll find "Fast Forward," a 
column written by COM- 
PUTE'S multimedia expert, 
David English; a feature; a 
new-products section; and an 
in-depth review we're calling 
"Multimedia Spotlight." 

Each Multimedia PC sec- 
tion will kick off with the "Fast 




Forward" column, which will 
take a hard look at what's 
new and what's just around 
the corner in multimedia tech- 
nology. If you want to get the 
scoop on the leading edge, 
look here. In this issue, 
David's column focuses on 
the new MPC Level 2 specifi- 
cation and why it's the way to 
go. Don't buy a new multime- 
dia PC or upgrade kit until 
you've read about the latest 
standard. 
The multimedia feature will 



cover everything from hands- 
on help to buyer's guides. 
This issue's feature, "Open Win- 
dows to Sound," tells you 
what to look for in a sound 
card and speal<ers, with de- 
tails about the best equipment, 
including both MIDI and high- 
end studio applications. 

"New Multimedia Products" 
vj\\l cover the latest available 
hardware and software — the 
stuff you'll probably have 
read about a few months be- 
fore in "Fast FonAfard." For de- 
tails about what's new and 
noteworthy, turn here. 

The last article in our multi- 
media section will be "Multime- 
dia Spotlight," a review of the 
coolest MPC product we've 
seen for the month. The first 
"Spotlight" takes a look at PC 
Karaoke. If you sing "New 
York, New York" in the show- 
er but dream of bigger 
things, your multimedia PC 
may help you. 

This is just the beginning. 
We have lots of exciting things 
planned. Taking just one peek 
ahead, if there's a multimedia 
aficionado on your gift list this 
year, don't miss our next is- 
sue's feature on great multime- 
dia gift ideas. 

Multimedia isn't the only 
new thing happening this 
month at COMPUTE. Last 
month, I talked a little about 
COMPUTE going live on Amer- 
ica Online. I couldn't say too 
much about our forum then be- 
cause lots of details were still 
up in the air; now, every- 
thing's finalized, working, and 
pretty nifty. 

Before talking about COM- 
PUTE'S AOL edition, it might 
be worthwhile to touch a little 
on COMPUTE'S history. As 
many of you know, COM- 
PUTE'S been publishing for 
15 years, giving home and 
business PC users all the lat- 
est information about hard- 
ware, as well as productivity, 
education, and entertainment 
software, in a form that's easy 



to understand and easy to 
use. 

Our online edition of COM- 
PUTE will offer some of the 
best from our regular edition, 
including hints and tips about 
everything from DOS batch 
files to database program- 
ming, the latest scoops on 
hot Windows apps and cool 
multimedia titles, and in- 
depth reviews and head-to- 
head Test Labs. 

You can get to the COM- 
PUTE forum on AOL with the 
keyword COMPUTE. When 
you arrive, you'll see the COM- 
PUTE logo in a window with 
several buttons and a list box 
filled with places to visit. The 
two big buttons in the upper 
right are for what's new in the 
forum. These buttons will 
change every few days, so 
check them out regularly Oth- 
er buttons let you move quick- 
ly to popular areas in the fo- 
rum: Message Boards, Tips & 
Tools, Software, and Text 
Search. 

The list box contains the top- 
ics for our online articles: Win- 
dows Workshop, News & 
Notes, Windows V\/orkshop, 
Multimedia PC, Games, Get- 
ting Started With, Test Lab, 
COMPUTE Ordering, and 
Computer Lingo. 

Perhaps the most impor- 
tant section in the COMPUTE 
forum hosts our message 
boards. We want COMPUTE 
Online to be more that just an 
online edition of the maga- 
zine. We want it to be an inter- 
active magazine, too. With 
the message boards, you'll 
be able to talk with COM- 
PUTE'S editors. You can ask 
us and your fellow online trav- 
elers questions directly, and 
generally make yourself more 
a part of the magazine. We're 
looking forward to more con- 
tact with you; I hope you'll 
take advantage of this oppor- 
tunity to let us hear what's on 
your mind. So link up, log on, 
and leave us a note. □ 



10 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




Mission 



IBM Programming Systems introduces 
C Set++,™ the most complete application 
development package you can buy for 
'03/2® lb 32-bit C/C++ 
compHer lets you unleash 
all the power of OS/2 — so you can 
create the most advanced, high- 
performance applications. 

It has an extraordinary code optimizer wth a 
full set of options. Even a switch to optimize for the new 
Pentium™ processor. Plus a fuH set of class libraries, 
including application frameworks for PM, container 
classes and classes for multitasking, streams and more. 

There's also a fuU complement of other helpful 
features. Such as an interactive source level debugger. 

And the unique Execution Trace 
Analyzer traces the 

execution of a program, 
then graphically displays 
^^^ ^^.aa^— - diagrams of the 

^•^ ^B^^^ ** I m library browser that 
shows class library relationships. 

What's more, you get Workframe/2™ a language- 
independent tool that lets you customize your own envi- 
ronment. It's adaptable and flexible — you can use any 16 
and 32-bit DOS, Windows™ and OS/2 tools. 







t«tm«. i-wi^l-,' 


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1 C Set ++ Technical Features 


Standards 


ANSI CX3.1 59-1989 


NIST validated 


ANSI C++ X3J16 (Full ARM) 


1509899:1990 


^^K^ 


■ . 


Global :^^^^^ta 


^^ 


Inter-module 


Optimization 


Function Inllning 


Instruction scheduling 


^^^^ 





To order C Set-t-H , 
contact your nearest dealer or call 
1-800-342-6672 (USA) or 
1-800-465-7999 ext. 460 (Canada). 

Qearly, there's only one place to start. C Set++ . 



starts 
here 



IBM and OS/2 are registered trademarks and C Set +4 and Wbrkframe/2 are trademarks of Intemationai Business Macttines Corporatton. Pentium Is a trademark of Intel Corporation. 
Windows is a Irademaikot Microsoft Corp. <S t9g3 IBItl Corp. 



J 



BUILT-IN WINDOl 



We all know what a head is for. It's a great 
hatrack. You can break down a door with it, it 
even makes a fair percussion instrument. Oh, 
and it comes with a brain inside. You can use your 
brain to make work simpler, or you can ignore it and 
use your head for a hatrack. It's the same way with 
Windows. Too many of us are using Windows as if it 
were only a brainless task switcher, good for keeping 
those mysterious Windows programs under some kind 
of control, but otherwise a memory-wasting nuisance. 

Windows has so much more to offer than a shell 
and a task switcher, yet many of us never venture into 
that no man's land of advanced Windows features. 
Fear not! if you step off the beaten path, you'll dis- 
cover that Windows has features that will make your 
work easier and more intuitive, your output more 
attractive, and your computer an even abler assistant 
than it was before. 

This article will talk about TrueType, the Recorder, 
the Clipboard, and OLE and DDE, You'll find out what 
they are and how to use them, 

f^emember, though, that not all Windows applica- 
tions use all of these features. Therefore, before try- 
ing any of the options discussed here, you should 
check your applications' documentation to make sure 
they support these advanced Windows features. The 
examples we'll use involve Windows Paintbrush and 
Windows Write, since everyone who has Windows 
has these applications, (vlicrosoft was kind enough to 
make sure that both of these so-called accessories 
take full advantage of the advanced features. 

Font of Wisdom 

TrueType was developed in a cooperative effort 
between (Vlicrosoft and Apple Computer to establish 
a font technology that could be used across comput- 
er platforms (read that could be used on the Mac and 
the PC) and that wasn't dependent on PostScript, 
which is a product of Adobe. TrueType is part of a 
larger page description language called Truelmage, 
which is available in place of the PostScript language 
on many "PostScript-compatible" printers. The advan- 
tage of TrueType fonts over PostScript fonts for the 
casual user is that, without, additional software (such 
as Facelift or Adobe Type fs/lanager), TrueType fonts 
can be printed on any printer that has a Windows dri- 



ver, and they appear onscreen pretty much as they 
will appear on the page. This provides high-quality 
outline fonts for use with PCL laser printers (also 
known as Hewlett-Packard-compatible printers) as 
well as ink-jet printers, thermal transfer printers, and 
even dot-matrix printers and fax machines. 

There's nothing new to learn about using TrueType 
fonts. All you have to do is make sure they're installed 
and active under Windows. To do this, open the Main 
program group, double-click on Control Panel, and 
then double-click on Fonts. A dialog box will open up, 
and one of the buttons on the right side of the box 
should be marked TrueType. Click on that button, and 
you'll see a dialog box with two options: Enable 
TrueType Fonts and Show Only TrueType Fonts in 
Applications, Make sure the check box next to Enable 
TrueType Fonts is checked, The available fonts will 
appear in the font lists of programs that support 
TrueType (which includes most programs released 
since Windows 3.1 appeared on the market). 

The TrueType fonts are attractive, well designed, 
and easy to use, but their greatest effect has been in 
the area of marketing. Before TrueType, purchasing a 
font meant laying out major bucks. A single font could 
cost $100 or more, and people who found good-look- 
ing fonts for as little as $20 or $30 considered them- 
selves lucky. 

Since the appearance of TrueType, the cost of 
fonts has diminished to the point that you can pur- 
chase professionally designed fonts for as little as $2 
apiece in packages. Many drawing programs are 
packed with dozens of free fonts as a premium 
(CorelDRAW! 4.0 alone was shipped with 750 
TrueType fonts in its CD-ROM version), and you can 
find dozens of excellent fonts on bulletin boards and 
online services for the cost of downloading them 
(CorelDRAW! is the major reason for this; its font 
design capabilities are awesome). 

Bear in mind that TrueType has not yet made its 
way into professional circles. Many typesetters 
require Adobe PostScript fonts and cannot yet use 
TrueType fonts. If you're preparing something for 
typesetting, be sure to find out from your typesetter 
what kinds of fonts to use before you start laying out 
your publication. Otherwise, you might be in for an 
unpleasant surprise — and a lot of extra work. 



By Robert Bixby 



rS POWER TOOLS 




An alphabet soup of extraordinary 
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Instant Replay 

Windows' Recorder Is a much-maligned 
macro facility. Its shortcomings were 
among the main reasons for Hewlett- 
Packard's NewWave product, which 
features prominent among its advan- 
tages a fully schpted macro language. 
The Recorder may be limited, but within 
its small domain, it's very powerful. 

The key to using the Recorder with 
the mouse is that you must settle on 
specific positions for all the objects on 
your Windows desktop. The reason for 
this is that the Recorder understands 
only keypresses, mouse clicks, and 
mickeys. What's a mickey? It's a unit 
of measure for mouse movement 
across your desktop. The implications 
of this are that when you record a 
mouse click at a given location on the 
desktop, the Recorder script will 
remember only the click and the loca- 
tion of the mouse pointer. If you move 
the icon that was in that position when 
you clicked or place another icon on 
top of it, the Recorder macro will be 
useless (and potentially dangerous). 

Therefore, the first step in successful 
Recorder use is either to construct a 
comfortable arrangement of items on 
your desktop and keep the items in that 
arrangement as long as you use your 
library of Recorder macros or to record 
only keypresses {this is one of the 
options as you begin recording a 
macro). Veteran Recorder users recom- 
mend recording keypresses because 
they're completely independent of 
arrangement of objects on the screen 
and they're much less ambiguous. 

To use the Recorder, double-click 
on its icon in the Accessories program 
group. The Recorder window will 
appear. Pull down the Macro menu 
and select Record. The options in this 
dialog box allow you to record mouse 
movement and clicks, ignore mouse 
(record keyboard entry only), or to 
record everything (mouse and key- 
board). You can select a key combi- 
nation to assign the macro to, such as 
Ctrl-Z. You can tell the macro to play 
fast or at the same speed it was 
recorded, and you can make the 
mouse movements relative to the full 
screen or the window. 

You can't edit a macro, but you 
can call another macro within a macro 
(to do this, you must have Enable 
Shortcut Keys checked in the Record 
dialog box; to run another macro v/ith- 
in a macro, just press the shortcut key 
for that macro while recording a 
macro). 

Let's try recording a macro. The 
Recorder works with any application, 
so let's use Write for the example. 

Start up Write. 

Bring the Program Manager to the 

14 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



foreground and double-click on the 
Recorder icon in the Accessories pro- 
gram group. 

Pull down the Macro menu and 
select Record. 

In the resulting dialog box, type z in 
the Shortcut Key text box and select 
Everything in the Record Mouse list 
box. Make sure that Playback To is set 
to Same Application, that Playback 
Speed is set to Fast, that the 
Continuous Loop check box is not 
checked, and that the Enable Shortcut 
Keys check box is checked. 

Click on Start to begin recording. 
The Recorder will be minimized. 

Type some text in Write. A good 
use for a macro is to record your let- 
terhead information so you don't have 
to type it out each time you write a let- 
ter. Enter your name, address, and 
telephone number; drag through all 
the text; and press Alt-P, C to center it 
on the page. That's enough for your 
first macro. Let's turn off the Recorder. 

Double-click on the minimized 
Recorder icon. Macro recording will be 
suspended, and a dialog box will open, 
giving you the options of Save Macro, 
Cancel Recording, and Resume 
Recording. If you want, you can now 
take other actions that will not be 
recorded and then resume recording at 
a later time by just selecting Resume 
Recording. However, at this time we will 
save the macro for later use. 

Click on Save Macro. The macro 
will not be saved to its own file but 
rather to a collection of macros. You 
can have as many collections of 
macros as you want, and each collec- 
tion of macros can contain dozens of 
individual commands. 

To save your current collection of 
recorded macros, pull down the File 
menu in the Recorder dialog box and 
select Save. The familiar Save dialog 
box will open, and you can save your 
macro collection v/ith any name you 
choose, although the default extension 
for recorded macro collections is REC. 

You can't edit a recorded macro 
(you have to rerecord the macro from 
beginning to end), but you can 
change the properties of a macro by 
clicking on the macro in the Recorder 
dialog box, pulling down the Macro 
menu, and selecting Properties. 

Since you can't edit macros, a 
good strategy is to atomize them. 
Break a single task into several short 
tasks, giving each of these tasks its 
own shortcut key combination. Then, 
when it comes time to put all the short 
macros together into a larger macro, 
record a macro in which all you do is 
press the shortcut key combinations 
for the shorter macros. That way, if 
some aspect of your macro changes, 



you need rerecord only the one or two 
parts of your macro that have 
changed, not the whole thing, 
Recording a long, detailed macro can 
be an exercise in frustration. Each 
time you make some small mistake, 
you'll have to start over again. By 
breaking your macro down, you can 
deal with it in manageable chunks. 

Cutting and Pasting 

The Clipboard is hardly an advanced 
feature. It's been around since the 
very beginning in Windows, and most 
people have used it, whether they 
were aware of it or not. If you cut or 
copy something from a document and 
then paste it back into that or another 
document, you've used the Clipboard. 
But there are more ways to use it. For 
example, did you know that Windows 
has a built-in screen capture facility? 
Anytime you have something on the 
screen tfiat you want to capture for 
posterity, all you have to do is press 
your Print Screen key. The entire 
screen will instantly be placed on the 
Clipboard. From there, you can save 
the image to disk, or you can paste it 
into any application that can handle a 
bitmap image. The only drawback of 
saving the Clipboard image is that 
you can save it only in CLP format — 
the native format of the Clipboard. 
There are utilities (FreezeFrame by 
Delta Point, for example) that can con- 
vert the Clipboard file to a BMP or 
other bitmapped format. If you don't 
want to save the entire screen, press 
Alt-Print Screen to save an image of 
the active window to the Clipboard. 

If you've captured a screen image 
to the Clipboard, you can paste it into 
Windows Paintbrush, Once the image 
is in Paintbrush, you can save it as a 
BMP or PCX graphic. You may have 
tried pasting a full-screen image into 
Paintbrush and been frustrated 
because pasting the full-screen image 
results in a truncated image only as 
large as the window in Paintbrush. 
There's a technique for getting the 
whole image in (and thanks to Clifton 
Karnes's 101 Essential Windows Tips 
for this solution): Zoom out before 
pasting. That way, you can paste the 
whole image into the reduced-size 
screen. Pull down the View menu with- 
in Paintbrush and select Zoom Out. 
Pull down the Edit menu and select 
Paste. The Paintbrush window will ap- 
pear to be filled with a ghd. Pull down 
the Edit menu and select Paste again. 
The full-screen image will appear. Pull 
down the View menu and select Zoom 
In. You can scroll all over the screen 
and edit it; then you can save the 
result to disk as a BMP or PCX file. 

If you want to be really hip, capture 



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a screen that's typical of your 
Windows working desktop, paste it 
into Paintbrusti, save it as a BMP file, 
and then use ttiat file as your 
Windows wallpaper. Ttiat way, you'll 
look busy even wtien you don't have a 
single window open on your screen. 

To see what's on the Cfipboard 
and to save or load an image, you 
need to use the Clipboard Viewer, 
which is one of the applications in the 
Main program group. Double-click on 
the Clipboard Viewer icon, and you'll 
see the current contents of the 
Clipboard. Just for fun, when the 
Clipboard Viewer is visible, press Print 
Screen and then Alt-Print Screen to 
see what happens to the contents of 
the Clipboard. 

You can use the Clipboard to store 
information from DOS applications 
running under Windows. In 386 
enhanced mode, you can drag the 
mouse pointer through a DOS appli- 
cation to select data to be transferred 
to the Clipboard. In real or standard 
mode, you can transfer only an entire 
screenful of data to the Clipboard 
from the DOS application. 

If you're running a DOS application 
full screen under Windows and you 
press Alt-Print Screen, you'll save the 
entire DOS screen to the Clipboard as 



text. This can come in very handy. 

If you're running the DOS applica- 
tion in a window (press Alt-space bar 
to switch between running the appli- 
cation full screen and running the 
application in a window), you'll see a 
Control menu in the upper left corner 
of the window. This is similar to the 
Control menu in Windows applica- 
tions, but it has a couple of enhance- 
ments. First, It allows you to select the 
size of the type in the window (and 
therefore the size of the windov/ itself) 
under Fonts. Second, it gives you an 
Edit option. 

Pull down the Control menu and 
select Edit: then select Mark from the 
resulting submenu. Drag the mouse 
through some text in the DOS applica- 
tion to select it. Then press Enter, and 
the data you've selected will be copied 
to the Clipboard. If there is data in the 
Clipboard, you can paste it into your 
DOS application. This facility brings 
many of the advantages of Windows to 
DOS. 

The only thing you can't do is make 
OLE or DDE links with a DOS applica- 
tion (not yet, anyway) or cut data from 
your DOS application. 

Another use for the Clipboard, as 
you'll read shortly, is as a bridge to 
establish DDE and OLE links. 



Linking Documents 

OLE is the latest linking option in 
Windows. The acronym (usually pro- 
nounced like the Spanish interjection 
ole but sometimes spelled out, 0-L-E) 
stands for Object Linking and 
Embedding. OLE goes beyond its 
precursors, DDE and pasting from the 
Clipboard, in that instead of simply 
pasting a value in a document, it 
pastes the entire application in the 
document. That's a lot to compre- 
hend, so take a moment to consider 
the possibility of having all of Quattro 
Pro as part of an Ami Pro document, 
or all of Paintbrush as part of a Write 
document, Nov^ that you've consid- 
ered it, let's do it. 

Start up Paintbrush and Write. In 
Paintbrush, draw an image. It doesn't 
have to be anything fancy — just a rec- 
tangle or two of different colors would 
be fine- 
Save your drawing (saving the file 
containing the United object is crucial 
to the process). 

Drag a selection rectangle that 
encloses the drawing you just created. 
Pull down the Edit menu in Paintbrush 
and select Copy to place a copy of the 
image on the Clipboard. 

Click on Write. Pull down the Edit 
menu and sefect Paste Special and 




Y^. {"^^^ 



16 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



then Paintbrush Picture Object. Tlie contents of the 
Clipboard will be pasted into your Write document. But 
there's more. 

Close down Paintbrush so that all you have running is 
Whte with the linked object in it. 

Double-click on the linked object. If all goes well, 
Paintbrush should have started up, with the linked object in 
its window, ready for editing. 

How could you use a property like that? Imagine that 
you're designing a letterhead. Part of the design is the logo 
for your company. The logo committee is dnving you nuts 
by changing the logo constantly. By having the logo and 
the drawing program inside the letterhead itself, you can 
save time when changes come through by making them 
hght in the document itself instead of making them in some 
separate document and then going through the steps to 
update the changes in the final document. 

DDE is an earlier version of OLE, It's not as well sup- 
ported as it used to be and may be fading from use, but 
enough software still uses DDE that it's worth mentioning. 

Although it sounds like the latest insecticide or mind-alter- 
ing chemical, DDE was actually the first serious advance 
associated with Windows. It appeared with Windows/286 and 
Windows/386, and it allowed specially designed Windows 
applications to communicate with each other. 

DDE stands for Dynamic Data Exchange. When it's 
used, it allows you to move information from one applica- 
tion into a document created by another application. 
Sounds like cutting and pasting, doesn't it? Well, it goes a 
step beyond that. The information pasted into the new doc- 
ument is permanently linked to its ohgins. When data in the 
original application changes, the document into which it 
has been pasted is also updated, Is that clear? Maybe an 
example will help. 

Suppose you're preparing a 50-page annual report. 
Deadlines are tight, and the data in the spreadsheet keeps 
changing as information is being fed in from your many 
branch offices around the world. How will you know that 
the final information is in place when the document is sent 
to the typesetters? If you guess DDE, give yourself a star. 
When you link the bottom line in your spreadsheet to the 
gross earnings line in your text document, you'll know that 
when the final figures are in place, they'll also be com- 
pletely up-to-date in your annual report. 

Let's use DDE to see how it works. Once again, we' 
use Windows Paintbrush and Windows Write to demon 
strate the phnciples, but you could use most DDE-compli 
ant software to create an example of your own. 

Start up Windows Paintbrush. Draw a circle of one color and 
then a rectangle of another color. Save the painting to disk, 

Drag a selection rectangle that encloses the entire 
drawing and select Copy from the File menu. The drawing 
is now on the Clipboard, 

Start up Windows Wnte. Pull down the Edit menu and 
select Paste Link. Now when there are changes in the 
graphic in Paintbrush, they will be instantly reflected in the 
document in Write. 

Use Your Head 

Now that you know a little about what can happen in the 
background, you should never mistake Windows for a 
mere task switcher again. Windows is capable of even 
more now — with its multimedia add-ons that can make use 
of anirriation and sound. 

Windows has become a deep enough product that it 
will repay you handsomely for any time you spend learning 
how the pieces fit together. Remember: Use your head for 
something besides a hatrack — and put Windows to work 
every chance you get. □ 



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Circle Reader Service Number 180 



TEST LAB 



Edited by Mike Hudnall 
Reviews by Richard C. Leinecker 

Does your present computer 
setup allow you to be as pro- 
ductive as you can be? 
With each new generation 
of hardware and software, this is 
a question you've got to ask if you 
want to maintain a competitive 
edge. The arrival of stand-alone 
fax machines provided a tremen- 
dous productivity boost. Then 
computer fax cards entered the 
work scene, offering ease of use, 
even more convenience, and 
even greater productivity bene- 
fits. Now these cards are faster, 
less expensive, and more capa- 
ble than ever; and a number of 
companies are ready to take 
advantage of this market by offer- 
ing fax packages, many of which 
have OCR capabilities. 

The benefits of computer fax- 
ing were clear to me from the first 
day I used one of these packag- 
es. For months I wrote messages 
in Microsoft Word, printed them 
on my LaserJet, faxed them from 
the machine, and then threw 
them in the garbage. After my gar- 
bage can filled up enough times, 
after my LaserJet needed a new 
toner cartridge, and after I forgot 
to resend enough faxes after 
busy signals, I looked for a better 
way. The complete solution to all 
of these problems was my fax 
board and fax software. This 
month's Test Lab covers ten of 



ECEIV't 




BitFaxjS35j 



20 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



the best Windows-based fax soft- 
ware packages on the market. 

Using this technology begins 
the transition to a paperless office. 
Instead of printing to my LaserJet 
from Word, I now print to the fax 
board, I select the fax board from 
the Windows printer setup. Then, 
every time 1 print, the document 
routes to the fax board. No more 
full garbage cans and depleted ton- 
er cartridges from faxing! 

Getting busy fax machines 
doesn't bother me. I simply sched- 
ule outgoing faxes and let the soft- 
ware worry about trying again lat- 
er. No more irate phone calls 
asking where the fax is! 

These fax packages do a lot 
more than I need. But some of 
you are probably looking for just 
such capabilities. You can set up 
software to send documents on 
a regular basis. Let's say, for 
example, that you have a sales 
staff that needs current inventory 
and pricing information daily. Eve- 
ry day at 5:00 a.m., your fax soft- 
ware can dial them all with the cor- 
rect information based on a file 
on your hard drive. 

If you have several people on- 
site who all get faxes, you'li find 
this feature helpful: Fax software 
gives you the ability to set up sep- 
arate incoming boxes. This 
makes it possible for each person 
to print out his or her own faxes. 
That's good because you don't 
have to worry about a fax's going 
to the wrong desk and lying 
there for weeks. Another advan- 
tage is the security that's provid- 
ed to each person. Sensitive fax- 
es aren't open to unwanted eyes. 

If you do have something on 
paper that you need to fax, you'li 
need a scanner, too. Most of the 
packages easily import from scan- 
ners. Here again, the fax-card- 



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and-software solution is better 
than the old way. Once you have 
a document scanned in, you can 
load it into your favorite paint pro- 
gram or work with it using the fax 
software's built-in graphics tools. 
If necessary, you can use optical 
character recognition to convert 
a fax to editable text. 

I still have my dedicated fax 
machine. For the types of incom- 
ing faxes I get, it's ideal. But for my 
outgoing faxes, you won't catch 
me using it. Once you take a 
close look at the packages in this 
month's Test Lab, you may decide 
that they can solve many of your 
communication problems, too. 

RICHARD C- LEINECKER 

BITFAX EASY 

Many of you grew up on BitCom, 
the terminal program that at one 
time seemed to come with most 
of the modems sold. The same 
folks who developed BitCom ap- 
plied their telecommunications 
skills to the next logical step — 
fax software. If you're accus- 
tomed to BitCom, you might 
learn to use BitFax without much 
difficulty. It occupies a middle 
point between older DOS-based 
software and hardcore Windows 
technology. 

I know people who won't 
touch Windows software unless it 
follov^s every standard Windows 
interface technique in existence. 
I also know people who're used 
to DOS software and need the 
chance to ease into Windows. Bit- 
Fax bridges the two extremes. It 
doesn't completely follow the Win- 
dows interface standards, using 
a smaller-than-usual screen and 
2-D, rather than 3-D, buttons, for 
example. On the other hand, the 
program doesn't stay strictly with 
old DOS-style techniques. This is 
neither good nor bad: just be 
sure that this is what you want be- 
fore you consider BitFax. 

This version of BitFax includes 
an advanced OCR technology 
called Caere AnyFax technology. 
In the three programs I tested 



that use it, this OCR technology 
produced admirable results, The 
scores for these programs were 
about as good as the scores for 
any others. In my benchmark 
test, BitFax scored 77 percent. 
That's outstanding, especially con- 
sidering that the benchmark test 
has some built-in procedures 
that lower the scores. You won't 
have any trouble using the files it 
saves as long as you're willing to 
spend a few minutes editing the 
few characters that go awry. 

BitFax's fax viewer didn't have 
many features, but of the viewers 
covered in this roundup, this one 
was probably the easiest to use. 
Buttons and pull-down menus let 
you easily rotate, scale, and 
page through the fax document. 
For most people, this is enough — 
and the viewer is truly easy to 
use. 

With most of the fax packages, 
you have to identify the card 
you're using. With BitFax, I didn't 
have to. Some of the features I 
looked for were missing from this 
package. I couldn't find a way for 
incoming faxes to automatically 
print, nor could I find any scan- 
ner support. Also, there didn't 
appear to be any way to import 
and export phone book lists — a 
capability you'd really miss if you 
already have your phone nunn- 
bers and addresses in electronic 





BitFax Easy 



Help 





Recede Fax Kecer/e Log 



i^ 



VKw/Piiirf 




format. However, even these omis- 
sions don't prevent BitFax from 
being a good choice for a num- 
ber of people. And this latest ver- 
sion of the software installs more 
easily than the previous version, 
has improved documentation, 
and now comes with BitCom, a 
terminal program. 

If you want software that 
sends faxes, receives faxes, and 
does OCR conversion, and if you 
dont need your fax software to 
do anything else, this could be a 
good choice for you. Particularly 
if you still feel more comfortable 
with DOS-based software, give 
BitFax a look. 

circle Reader Service Number 371 

DATAFAX 4.01 

This is no ordinary fax software. 
The designers at Trio made sure 
DataFAX went beyond other fax 
software by including extras that 
most people don't even think of. 
Besides working on my stand- 
alone system, it's network ready. 
Cover pages can be converted to 



DataFAX 4.01— $129 

TRIO INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
8601 Six Forks Rd., Ste. 615 
Raleigh, NC 27615 
(800) 880-4400 
(919) 846-4990 



28 different languages. A slightly 
different fax protocol needed 
when communicating with Ger- 
man fax machines can be turned 
on. And the OCR conversion proc- 
ess exports to a number of popu- 
lar word processor formats. 

All of tfie features you'd expect 
are there. You get background 
sending and receiving, OCR con- 
version, graphical editing tools, 
and scheduled transmissions. 
They're all admirably implement- 
ed; just click on a button or menu 
selection. DataFAX uses more but- 
tons with icons than the other fax 
software. Although it took me a bit 
longer to learn what each one rep- 
resented, once I did, the interface 
was very easy to use. 

In examining DataFAX, I 
received the impression that the 
designers didn't look at other fax 
software during the design proc- 
ess. They seemed to start from 
scratch as they created their idea 
of the perfect fax software. 

During the installation, as 
DataFAX copies each file to the 
hard drive, a message tells you 
exactly what the file does. I've nev- 
er seen an install program do that, 
but it sure was a nice change. 
Also, that the software which runs 
on my system is network ready dis- 
tinguishes this product from other 
fax packages, fvlost companies 
charge plenty for their network 
versions. The international sup- 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 21 



TEST LAB 




wrr~cn 

Trio Information Systems 



^W ffirftm ti n cMi ' 




port, something else not found in 
the other fax software, may find 
favor with you if you do much over- 
seas faxing. Sending a cover 
sheet to Paris with French titles is 
pretty impressive. 

Here's another feature you 
might lil<e. DataFAX has the reg- 
ular front-end program like all the 
others, but there's a special small- 
er version called Captive that can 
be loaded and always stays on the 
screen as a small window, ready 
to be called upon when needed. 
Clicking on the button activates it 
and gives you several other choic- 
es that let you do quick operations 
such as sending a fax note or cap- 
turing part of the screen to fax. You 
can even drag files from the File 
Manager to it, and it will send 
them as faxes! 

The OCR conversion of faxes to 
text worked adequately. The nic- 
est part was the ability to save the 
files in ASCII, Excel, Word, Lotus, 
WordPerfect, and Ami Pro formats, 

Changing program configura- 
tion is easy. Menu entries take 
you right to dialog boxes that let 
you change any part of the pro- 
gram's setup. That's important 
because it can be hard to match 
the setup to your fax/data modem 
card the first time. For most of the 

22 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



fax software, I needed at least 
two or three tries. You'll be glad 
you can change the program con- 
figuration if things don't work the 
first time around. 

DataFAX is a fine piece of soft- 
ware. It performed well for me on 
a stand-alone PC. If you need net- 
work capabilities or do a lot of 
international faxing, that might tip 
the scales for you in the direction 
of DataFAX. 

circle Reader Service Number 372 

DELRINA WINFAX 
PRO 3.0 

After spending time with Delrina 
WinFax Pro, I could just imagine 
the planners and developers sit- 
ting around thinking about what 
they couid possibly include in 
this latest version so that it would 
top the previous version. The re- 
sulting package, if not the abso- 
lute best, is pretty close. During 



Delrina WinFax Pro 3.0— $129 

DELRINA 

6830 Via del Oro, Ste. 240 
San Jose, CA 95119 
(800) 268-6082 



the testing, I opened the manual 
for a total of 2 minutes. After that, 
I read for 20 minutes to make an 
assessment for my rating. When 
something this complex doesn't 
need a manual, it says a lot 
about the software. 

All of the standard features are 
there: background sending and 
receiving, scheduled transmis- 
sions to individuals or groups 
from one of the phone lists, OCR 
conversion to text files, and gra- 
phical editing tools. These features 
deserve more than casual men- 
tion, because they're the result of 
years of hard work. But in this day 
and age, we expect outstanding 
software — so I'll go on to mention 
the exceptional points. 

WinFax Pro uses a third-party 
technology called Caere AnyFax 
technology. The three programs 
in our roundup that use it per- 
formed OCR conversion about as 
well as any of the other fax pro- 
grams. Bear in mind that the com- 
parison program I used had 
some built-in procedures that 
tend to lower the score from 100 
percent, even for perfectly 
matched files. Yet WinFax Pro 
came up with a 68-percent rate 
of conversion, more than ade- 
quate to convert faxes to usable 
text files. 

If you'd rather skip the frills, the 
next part won't interest you. But 
most of us will appreciate that Win- 




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Circle Reader Service Number 161 



TEST LAB 



Fax Pro's cover sheets transform 
boring and easily lost faxes into 
experiences that people can't 
ignore. I counted 105 different cov- 
er sheets, all customizable. The 
next time I can't get results from 
some company's tech support. 
I'm going to send the cover 
sheet with Shakespeare saying 
"It would be a tragedy if the fol- 
lowing went unread." And for col- 
lecting past due invoices, I'll use 
the one with a guy on a ledge say- 
ing "We're getting desperate! 
Please drop us a check'" In all 
seriousness, cover sheets like 
these get results. 

Another feature I liked was the 
ability to show thumbnails of all 
pages of a document. This can 
be a great help if you want to 
make sure your presentation has 
the right overall effect. 

fvlost fax software defaults to 
automatic answer and reception. 
WinFax Pro is different. When it's 
installed, it doesn't automatically 
answer calls. This small touch 
might seem insignificant, but 
wait until your phone line is dou- 
bling as a fax and you lose sev- 
eral calls because a caller gets a 
carrier signal. All of the programs 
can turn automatic answering off. 
WinFax Pro's choice of defaults 
demonstrates a real understand- 



Wjrik- r 

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till Vn-w Iti^i-tt lormal lo.il-., I.ihlc SViniSiiw yi:l(> 

P«fl«i 5-6 



WinFax PRO Send Fax 



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ing of how the software is used. 

The install program does its 
best to identity your fax/data 
modem board and its COM port. 
For mine, it guessed Class 1, but 
then I couldn't send without trans- 
mission errors on the remote end. 
I had to reinstall the software to 
make the change. In the next ver- 
sion of WinFax Pro, I'd like to see 
the ability to make such a change 
without reinstalling the software. 

As for background operations. 




I noticed only slight hiccups. 
There weren't any of the delays I 
experienced with many of the oth- 
er packages. I had no trouble run- 
ning other applications while Win- 
Fax Pro was in operation. 

When I evaluate software, usu- 
ally there are dozens of features 
I'd like to see added. Not so with 
WinFax Pro. If you're looking for 
power in a fax program, this is def- 
initely one to consider. 

circle Reader Service Number 373 

ECUPSE FAX WITH 
OCR 1.21 

Eclipse FAX with OCR 1.21 takes 
a straightforward approach to fax- 
ing. If you aren't interested in a lot 
of fancy buttons and cute touch- 
es, this package could be the 
one you're looking for. While the 
developers didn't waste effort on 
frills, neither did they skip any 
important features. Everything 
you need to do your faxing is 
included. 

The package sends and re- 
ceives faxes manually or in the 
background, and it is also capa- 
ble of scheduled transmissions. It 
lets you keep multiple phone 
books, use your scanner for input. 



24 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




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TEST LAB 




and view and edit faxes. I found 
the program's well-planned fea- 
tures clear and easy to use. 

I frequently use faxes to con- 
tact people wtio fiaven't 
answered voice mail. All I need to 
do is to write them a note of sev- 
eral lines, letting them know what 
I need. Even the most die-hard 
voice-mail avoiders. it seems, 
respond to a fax. Eclipse RAX's 
Quick Note feature takes you 
through the simple process of 
selecting a name from your 
phone list with a double click, 
then typing a short note. This is 
consistent with the package's sim- 
ple approach, Even with several 
other software packages in- 
stalled on my computer, I came 
back to Eclipse FAX when I need- 
ed to send a one- or two-line fax. 

Another handy Eclipse FAX fea- 
ture is its ability to index a collec- 
tion of faxes. With this feature, 
browsing or searching through 
your faxes is a snap. To find a par- 
ticular fax. just enter a keyword 
that matches a keyword you 
typed in when the document was 
saved. The program also facili- 
tates searches by offering a vari- 
ety of ways of sorting information. 

Eclipse FAX occasionally 
takes control of Windows for sev- 
eral seconds, most notably in the 
period of 15-20 seconds when it 
first connects to a rennote fax. Dur- 
ing transmission, there are also 
periods of 2-3 seconds between 
pages when the program takes 
control of Windows. It's easy to 
start clicking the mouse and press- 
ing keys during these periods, 
but that can be trouble. Each 

26 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Eclipse FAX with OCR t.21— $129 

PHOENfX TECHNOLOGIES 
Eclipse Division 
846 University Ave. 
Norwood, MA 02052 
(SOD) 452-0120 



time you click or press, Windows 
remembers; and once the active 
application regains control, your 
clicks and keypresses will all be 
executed in rapid succession. I 
spent plenty of time restoring my 
icons to where they used to be, 
after numerous pent-up mouse 
clicks were released. 

On one occasion, I used the 
program to convert a fax to a text 
file with the OCR feature. This re- 
quired a great deal of processor 
time and involved large numbers 
of disk accesses. During a back- 
ground send, the conversion 
caused an unexpected delay for 
the remote fax device because the 
remote device terminated the con- 
nection and reported a communi- 
cation error. Since it happened 
only once, and that was during unu- 
sually heavy system use, I don't 
think it's a problem. My stand- 
alone fax machine occasionally 
can't complete a transmission for 
one reason or another. 



If you're the type who gets 
right to business and would rath- 
er forgo frills, this might be your 
package. I like it because it 
doesn't take up much disk space 
and it's easy to use to send a 
quick note. 

circle Reader Service Number 374 

FAXMASTER 

Caere, the company that devel- 
oped the AnyFax OCR technolo- 
gy, licensed by several other com- 
panies, has also developed its 
own fax software. With such a 
significant part of the fax technolo- 
gy mastered and at Caere's dis- 
posal, it's no wonder. FaxMaster 
is an easy-to-use alternative to 
the other packages. Though not 
as full-featured as some other fax 
packages, this product boasts a 
look and feel that may make it 
your first choice. 

All of the important features 
are there and are professionally 
implemented. Sending or receiv- 
ing faxes is simple and effortless, 
Scanner support, scheduled trans- 
missions, a viewer, and a phone 
list provide the tools to maximize 
productivity. Missing are less-impor- 
tant features, such as graphical 
editing tools, the ability to import 
and export phone lists, and the abil- 



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THE COMPUTER PRINTER 



TEST LAB 




Ity to change screen colors, 

Making a complex piece of soft- 
ware easy to use is no small feat, 
but Caere has managed to do it. 
At the top of the screen is the pull- 
down menu and, below that, six 
icons representing the major pro- 
gram functions. The remainder of 
the screen contains either thumb- 
nail documents from which you 
can select or a full view of a 
selected document. I like being 
able to select from thumbnails; 
it's much easier and more enjoy- 
able to select from these miniatur- 
ized representations of faxes 
than from a list of faxes (usually 
with dates and times as their only 
identifiers). 

Of course, Caere's OCR tech- 
nology is state-of-the-art. The 
AnyFax technology is easily rec- 
ognizable during the conversion 
process; you see an image of the 
fax page and watch the text 
become highlighted as the pro- 
gram processes it. You can also 
see a small window with an ex- 
panded piece of text while it's 
operating, FaxMaster scored a 
64 percent — not the best score of 
the lot, but pretty good. Two fac- 
tors that can affect my compari- 
son of the OCR-produced docu- 
ment to the original document are 
pagination marks and inserted 
form feeds. While pagination and 
form feeds are useful features, 
they accounted for FaxMaster's 
lower-than-expeoted score in the 
comparison; if the pagination 
marks are important to you, or 
you need form feeds for easy print- 
ing, don't let the score diminish 
your appreciation of this pack- 

28 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



FaxMaster— $109 

CAERE 

100 Cooper Ct. 
Los Gatos, CA 85030 
(800) 535-SCAN 



age's OCR capabilities. 

The computer industry has its 
share of jargon and buzzwords. I 
easily added some of these 
words to the program's user dic- 
tionary so that it would have an eas- 
ier time recognizing them during 
OCR conversion. This was helpful, 
since my test document had 
words like dBASE, Excel, and AS- 
CII. Adding words to the user dic- 
tionary that commonly appear in 
faxes will improve accuracy. 

Most people don't adequately 
appreciate the value of easy ac- 
cess to a program's setup. After 
spending a large block of time 
with this month's fax software 
packages, I think I appreciate the 
value of this easy access more 
than ever. Thankfully. FaxMaster 
makes its setup parameters read- 
ily available from several pull- 
down menu entries. 

I particularly enjoyed using 
FaxMaster, largely as a result of 
its easy-to-use interface and easy 
feature presentation. 1 didn't 



WHAT IS OCR AND WHY 

DO YOU NEED IT? 

When a fax comes in, regardless of 
what was used to create it, it's real- 
ly a picture rather tfian a text file. 

This picture can't be loaded into 
a word processor for editing. So, if 
you received a fax from someone 
with information that had to be 
faxed to someone else, you 
couldn't just load ii into WordPer- 
fect, make some cinanges, and 
send it on. You'd have to manually 
retype it, edit it, and then send it. 

One other disadvantage to these 
picture files is that they take up tar 
more room on your hard drive than 
text files. That might be a problem 
for you if you're anything like me. My 
hard drive is constantly full! 

Optical character recognition 
(OCR) has been developed to the 
point that it can solve these problems 
by converting a picture file to an AS- 
CII or word processor file. Many of 
the fax packages have this capabili- 
ty built in. and it adds a powerful tool 
to your fax manipulation arsenal. 
Now you can convert the incoming 
data to text files and use your word 
processor to edit them. 

OCR isn't perfect. You'll be disap- 
pointed if you expect 100-percent 
accuracy But correcting a few er- 
rors is surely better than retyping an 
entire document. 

— FilCHARD C. LEINECKER 




X 





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Circle Reader Servic^e Number 206 



TEST LAB 




open the manual until it was time 
to rate it. Tlnere were no setup 
problems, so I was up and run- 
ning in less than five minutes. 
Take a serious look at FaxMaster. 
Its strong points might make it 
just what you need. 

circle Reader Service Number 375 

FAXWORKS PRO S.O 

The programmers at SofNet really 
know fax technology. Their install 
program found out practically eve- 
rything about my fax/data modem 
card. I learned things about it that 
weren't in the manual, including 
the chip type and revision number. 



FaxWorhs Pro 3.0— $129.09; $64.99 
tor iower-end version without OCR 
and advanced lax management and 
annotation tools 

SOFNET 

380 Interstate North PJmy., Ste. 150 

Atlanta, GA 30339 

(800) 4-FaxWarks 

[im] 984'8088 



This mastery of the technology 
translated into worry-free fax send- 
ing and receiving. 

The features you'd expect are 
there: sending and receiving, 
OCR conversion to text files, 
phone lists, scanner support, and 
an easy-to-use viewer. You'll also 
find one of the best cover page 
creation utilities, which includes 
hundreds of clip art images. 

If you don't want to waste time 
trying to correctly configure your 
fax software, or if you're afraid 
you'll never figure it out and 
might really mess something up, 
FaxWorks Pro's easy installation 
makes it a good choice. By con- 
trast, I spent several days config- 
uring, reconfiguring, and reinstall- 
ing some of the other software to 
get everything working. That's a lot 
of time for someone who's compe- 
tent and computer-literate. 



OCR CONVERSION ACCURACY 



80 



BETTER 



B 70 



WORSE 



60 



lIj 




%>/'"'&. 






30 



COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



There's one feature in this pack- 
age that I've never seen in any oth- 
er software, and that's a quick 
way to access system configura- 
tion files. Using a pull-down 
menu, you can view and edit 
your WIN. INI and FAX- 
WORKS. INI, among others. If I'd 
experienced trouble getting 
things to work, this might have 
been a valuable ability. I guess 
the folks at SofNet wanted to 
make sure their tech support peo- 
ple could easily help customers 
in case there was a problem. 

The main screen in FaxWorks 
Pro isn't fancy but the six icons 
are enough to help you navigate 
without much need to pull down 
menus. One icon calls up what 
SofNet calls a FaxTracker, which 
is a general fax maintenance win- 
dow. What I liked best about this 
screen was the array of radio but- 
tons at the top that change it 
from a send log lo a receive log 
to the file access dialog box to 
the file cabinet. When you click 
on these buttons, the function of 
the FaxTracker changes, but you 



OCR CONVERSIOt^ 
ACCURACY 

Each of Ihe fax packages received a 
ten-page document with notfiing but 
straight ASCII text. There were no 
lines or other marks that couldn't be con- 
verted to text. The faxes were then con- 
verted to text files and compared with 
the original document from which the 
faxed printout was made. 

The program that I used to compare 
the files employs some procedures 
that make it impossible for any of 
these fax products lo score 100 per- 
cent. RIes that are identical to the origi- 
nal document score 92 percent, so any 
score close to that is pretty good. The 
best score was 79 percent—good 
enough that some quick editing gave 
me a usable file. 

For my own curiosity. I tried a hand- 
written note as well. None of the OCR 
technologies in these fax packages 
scored better than' 1 percent. I guess 
we're still at least a few years away 
from OCR technology that does well 
with handwritten files. 

—RICHARD C. LEINECKER 






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TEST LAB 




Select 

Copy 

E«8le 



Free ^and Drawing 

Une 

Ellipse 

Bectangle 

lext 

Ennla.,. 



Add Graphic. 
Save Custom Graphic- 
Eds signature > 



rj> f>MM Juwf IwiM* b^ u^l 



itathiHrtab Mymtum 



sofnet 



05«B«5 7:Mtlti 



don't have a different dialog box. 
Ttiat means you don't hiave to 
learn four different windows or di- 
alog box styles for these four dif- 
ferent program segments. Conse- 
quently, the interface reduces the 
learning curve immensely. 

One attractive feature that Win- 
dows newcomers in particular 
will appreciate is FaxWorks Pro's 
great system of context-sensitive 
help. There are two levels: one 
that simply gives you a single 
line of text and another that gives 
you large cue card-style blocks 
of help. In either case, you'll get 
plenty of help while you're learn- 
ing the software. I found the com- 
prehensive help that's accessed 
from the Help menu very com- 
plete and well written. 

The OCR technology per- 
formed admirably. It scored 79 
percent, making it one of the 
best 1 tested. It wasn't fast, and 
there wasn't a snazzy display 
while it operated, but with results 
like that, who cares? With a few 
minutes of editing, my conver- 
sions were perfectly usable. 

FaxWorks Pro gave me trouble- 
free service. It doesn't have a lot 
of fancy features, but it has eve- 
rything you'll probably need. 

Circle Reader Service Njmber 376 

34 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



INTEL FAXABILITY 
PLUS/OCR 

Intel FAXability Plus/OCR is a sol- 
id piece of software from a 
company famous for world-class 
microprocessors. Ithasamoderate- 
ly long feature list, and I found the 
interface workable, but the instal- 
lation involved more effort than I 
had planned on. Probably its 
most distinctive feature, and the 
one that may sell you on the prod- 
uct, is its ability to convert faxes to 
popular word-processing formats. 
The major features are there — 
background receive and send, 
OCR conversion to text files, scan- 
ner support, phone lists, and cus- 
tom cover pages. Some less- 
Important features are missing, 
such as automatic printing of 
incoming faxes, automatic fax 
cleanup, graphic editing tools, 
and the ability to change screen 



Intel FAXability Plus/OCR— $129; 
$79 tor version without OCR 

INTEL 

P.O. Box 14070 
Partland, OR 97214 
(8001 538-3373 



colors. Of these missing features, 
the automatic fax cleanup is the 
only feature I use occasionally in 
the other fax packages. FAXabil- 
ity does include some features 
not found in the others. You can 
print faxes in landscape or por- 
trait mode and load different print- 
er fonts, for example. 

The OCR conversion per- 
formed well. My benchmark test 
measured OCR accuracy at 72 
percent. Other nneasures of OCR 
accuracy would probably be bet- 
ter than 80 percent. The benefits 
of OCR here, as in other packag- 
es covered this month, are clear. 
You can use the text files created 
from the faxes as you would any 
other documents, or you can use 
them as records of the faxes 
from which they derive. 

The amazing thing about the 
FAXability OCR conversion proc- 
ess is the enormous variety of for- 
mats it outputs to. You can convert 
faxes not only to straight ASCII 
files but to compatible files for 
most major word processors, in- 
cluding Microsoft Word, Microsoft 
Write, Ami Pro, PFS Professional 
Write, WordPerfect, WordStar, and 
XyWrite, And that's a small part of 
the list. It also converts to dBASE, 
Microsoft Excel, and Lotus files. 

I had a tough time getting the 
software to work on my system. 
After I had sent a fax, my mouse 
became erratic and Windows lock- 



Inte! FAXability 

Plus/OCR 

Software 




In comparative sound tests 
Gravis Ultrasound was 
unanimously chosen over 

THE "BEST" fM-16 BIT 
SOUND CARD. 

We conducted the sound tests at 
CES and PC Expo and played it 
completely fair. The test was 
conducted with the same 
MIDI files, on the same 
computer, at the same time, 
and through exactly the 
same equipment. The 
result? To absolutely all 
who listened, UltraSound 
was overwhelmingly 
preferred. 

UltraSound received 
this vote of confidence 
because it is not just 
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delivers full, 
natural 
sounding 
instruments 
and unmatched 
sound effects -- 
not the artifi- 
cially created 
sounds of FM sound cards. 

UltraSound is the next 
generation of sound technology. With its 16-bit, 
44.1 kHz CD quality stereo sound, UltraSound 
is compatible with applications supporting 
Ad Lib* SoundBlaster", Windows 3.1, 
MPC, General Midi, and popular CD ROM titles. 

You have to experience the natural 
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Gravis dealer now! Or call 
Gravis for more information: 
1-604-43 1-50Z0 
1-604-431-5155 (fax) 

Advanced 

CRmns 

Computer Technology Ltd. 
Circle Reader Service Number 204 




CHOSE THE NATURAL 



SOUND OF ULTRASOUND 




All brands and trademarlc m On property of their respeclm owners. 



TEST LAB 



ed up. I tried a multitude of recon- 
figurations, and tliis took quite a 
long time, since a complete sys- 
tem restart is necessary witti 
each new configuration. 

I finally called an Intel tecfini- 
cal support representative, who 
solved my problem, fvly COM 
ports in Windows were set up in 
such a way that a conflict was cre- 
ated between COf\/l 3 and COM 4. 
I never understood this entirely, 
since I don't have a serial port on 
COM 3 (my communications card 
was COfvl 4). I spent about five min- 
utes explaining to the technician 
why the probiem wasn't my 
mouse driver He eventually check- 
ed with someone else and told me 
how to change my Windows port 
settings. This did the trick. 

I should have stopped there. 
The technician recommended I 
download a newer version of the 
program's CAS driver. I did, and 
things stopped working. To get 
my system working properly 
again, I had to delete the directo- 
ry and reinstall the software. Grant- 
ed, fax software is difficult to sup- 
port, but no other fax packages 
reviewed here had problems 
with my Windows port settings. 

Some of the features FAXabili- 
ty has might be important to you. 
You might need to save faxes in 



FAXability Manager 



file £dlt Transniil Options Window Help 



E 



^ 



Ottjils 



Hr^iwi 



1 r>^ I 



Ssvt As 



StcitUS 



Date 



Tine 



Size 



To / From 



Read 
Read 
Read 
Read 



flUQ/ 9/93 i»:12PH 1 paae 



Aug/ 9/93 2:50PH t page 

Aug/ 9/93 -I2:IM(PH 1 page 

Aug/ 9/93 12:11(PH 1 page 

Aug/ 9/93 11:51flH 6 pages 



17071*514269 
21272'i0825 
41S 3«»7 B721 
Unknown 



Phonebook Faxmodem: 
Idle 



Outbox 



<jnbox>: 1 o( 5 events selected. 



your word processor or spread- 
sheet format. Once configured 
properly, the software worked 
well. Just keep in mind that you 
may have to spend some time get- 
ting it to work the way you want 
it to work. 

circle Reader Service Number 377 

QUICKLINK GOLD 1.1 

When this program first ran, I did 
a double take, It looked like a 
DOS-style terminal program with 
some Windows-like icons at the 
top. Looks can be deceiving. 



RESOURCE INDEX: BACKGROUND SEND 



2,0 



BETTER 



WORSE 



ilmm 






\. %, 'V 'V V^ \, 'W \^ 



36 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



though, and I quickiy grew at- 
tached to this software. More 
than just fax software, QuickLink 
Gold 1.1 is a complete telecom- 
munications package, 

The designers and developers 
deserve special mention for their 



RESOURCE INDEX: 
BACKGROUND SEND 

This test was performed by select- 
ing a fax board as the default print- 
er and then printing the first ten pag- 
es of a document from Microsoft 
Word. The fax software prepared 
the documents, then dialed out and 
sent them. The test started when the 
dial-out was initiated and ended 
when the remote tax signaled an 
end to the transmission. 

In this test, the number recorded 
is an index of the amount of proces- 
sor time available for applications oth- 
er than the fax program running in 
the background. A perfect score 
would be 2,0; however, even with 
the background fax software idle, 
only a score of 1.9 is achievable, 
since Windows performs a number 
of background functions. The best 
score any of the fax software prod- 
ucts achieved was 1 .8. 

The columns in the accompany- 
ing chart reflect the relative perform- 
ance of the ten fax software prod- 
ucts covered in this Test Lab. A high 
score means that you won't constant- 
ly experience slowdowns during 
background sends. 




willingness to go against the 
grain. In several noticeable plac- 
es, ttie interface deviated from 
wtiat you'll find in every other Win- 
dows program in this roundup. 
The main screen is black with 
green text, in contrast to the nor- 
mal Windows look and feel. After 
my initial surprise, I was thankful. 
When returning from the pro- 
gram's other windows with the typ- 
ical Windows look, such as the 
fax viewer and setup dialog box- 
es, I always knew when I was 
home at the main screen. Other 
very nice touches were 3-D text 
and a modem LED simulation in 
the status box on the screen. 

QuickLink did especially weil 
converting faxes to text files. !n 
my benchmark test, it scored 79 
percent. However, QuickLink 
keeps track of its own success 
rate and registered a score of 92 
percent. These two scores are dif- 
ferent because the program 
counts only the unrecognizable 
characters, not the ones it gets 
completely wrong. The reality of 
QuickLink's success with OCR 
lies somewhere between my 
score and the program's — which 
is pretty remarkable. 

Hats off to QuickLink for deter- 
mining my exact hardware config- 
uration on the first try. It worked 
perfectly from the start, and I nev- 
er gave it a second thought after 
that. I don't guarantee you'll have 
the same success rate; I do, how- 
ever, think that my experience 



QuickLink Gold 1.1— $99.95 

SMITH MICRO SOFTWARE 
51 Columbia 
Aiiso Viejo, CA 92656 
E80G) g64~SIVISI 



with QuickLink speaks very well 
for the product, especially in con- 
trast to the difficulties I had with 
other installations. 

I was surprised by the amount 
of time the program required to 
send a ten-page document: It 
took 23 minutes and 28 seconds 
to send a simple ten-page docu- 
ment from Microsoft Word. That's 
double the time required by most 
of the other packages. There's 
probably a technical explanation 
for this, but I don't know what it 
is. You might not care, though. 
Since the send procedure goes 
on in the background, it won't 
stop you from working, If you're 
not constantly sending faxes, 
this probabiy won't be an issue. 

I know this isn't a review of 
telecommunications software, 
but I'm dying to tell you just a lit- 
tle about that part of the program. 
Besides, some of you might want 
to get this program because it 
can serve all of your communica- 
tions needs, not just your faxing 
needs. There's a built-in host 
mode, You can leave it running 
and dial in to access any file on 



your computer. All of the major 
file transfer protocols, such as 
XMODEf\/l, YMODEfVl, and 
ZfvlODEfvl, are built-in, And you 
can define macro keys to skip 
some of the steps when you log 
on to BBSs and online services. 
QuickLink is a fine piece of soft- 
ware, It'll fill most of your telecom- 
munications needs. On my sys- 
tem, it worked well, without any 
fuss — and that's worth a great 
deal to me. 

circle Reader Service Number 378 

RAPIDFAX GOLD 
2.10 FOR WINDOWS 

As soon as you run it, you can tell 
that RapidFAX is strictly busi- 
ness. Greeting you as the pro- 
gram opens are its three most 
important sections: the send log, 
the receive log, and the phone 
books. It was quite a while before 
I found it necessary to pull down 
any menus, since the icons and 
information in the windows are 
enough to help you do just about 
anything you might need to do 
with this program. 

All the features you need for pro- 
ductive faxing are there — sched- 
uling transmissions, OCR conver- 
sion, phone lists, scanner support, 
and cover sheets, RapidFAX 
lacks some infrequently used fea- 
tures, such as fax-editing tools. 



Status: Sending page 2 of 4 
Fax Name: XYZ Company 
Fax Number: 555-1212 
1 of 3 

LftiYOUT.QFX 
High 
01:31 



Group Status: 
Document: 
Resolution: 

Time Elapsed: 



FX HS flft CD OH P.X TX TR MR CS 



Cancel 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 37 



TEST LAB 




automatic fax cleanup, and the abili- 
ty to import and export your 
phone lists. For most small busi- 
nesses, tiiere's more than enough 
to meet communications needs. 

The OCR conversion utility was 
up to snuff. It scored a 66 per- 
cent, more than adequate for read- 
ing and understanding later. 
With a little time and effort, the 
text files could easily be edited 
and reused or resent later. 

Another plus is the abiiity to 
import and export different types 
of file formats. You can load any 
BMP, PCX, or TIF file and send it 
as a fax. That's really great, 
because you can capture just 
about anything in Windows and 
save it as PCX and BMP files. You 
can easily send presentation pag- 
es that include graphs and charts. 

There's a built-in memo func- 
tion that quickly allows you to 
send a memo to a destination fax 
without having to load a word proc- 
essor. 1 use this feature about as 
much as any other and am grate- 



RESOURCE INDEX: 
BACKGROUND RECEIVE 

As with the background send, an 
index was calculated demonstrating 
the processor time available for oth- 
er applications. The closer the num- 
ber is to 2.0, the better. The time 
elapsed during the receiving of the 
ten pages was not recorded, since 
the sending fax device determined 
how much time was needed. 



38 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



RapidFAX Gold 2.10 for Windows— 
$1 29; $79 for version without OCR or 
modem software 

THE COMPLETE PC 
19B3 Concourse Dr. 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(800) 229-1753 



ful for its inclusion. There's also a 
function that checks the integrity 
of files. I never found any incon- 
sistencies in mine, but if I were hav- 
ing problems, this might be at the 
top of my list of favorite features. 

fvlost computers come with the 
first two COM ports occupied by 
a serial port and a mouse, This is 
the case with my system and 
most systems I've used in the 
last three years. (The bad part is 
that my manuals that explain how 
to reconfigure those serial ports 
are always lost.) This configura- 
tion is a problem with RapidFAX, 
since it installs only to COM 1 or 
COM 2. And to further aggravate 
the situation, I didn't know any of 
this until after I installed it and 
tried to reboot. The memory-resi- 
dent software that ioads from AU- 
TOEXEC locked up, since I 
didn't have a fax/data modem 
card on COM 1 or COM 2. 

To make a long story short, I 



HOW FAXES WORK 

fdx communications tend to be pret- 
ty one-sided, as one fax device trans- 
fers information to the other Here's 
a brief description of how two fax 
devices observing standard proto- 
cols talk. 

The sending device dials anoth- 
er fax device, which automatically 
answers and sends a 2100-Hz tone 
back. For the musically inclined, 
that's a slightly sharp C three oc- 
taves above middle C. This tone con- 
firms that a fax machine has been 
reached and not a voice line or an- 
other machine type. 

The called fax device sends an 
identification packet at 300 baud. 
This packet contains all of the fax 
device's capabilities. The calling 
device sends a packet with the capa- 
bilities it selects for the exchange. 
Then the calling device sends a 
high-speed training signal, and the 
called device sends a message in- 
dicating that it's ready. 

Ail of the information is sent from 
the calling device, punctuated by 
short training messages. After all 
pages have been sent, the calling 
device sends a message indicating 
the end of transmission. The called 
device sends a confirmation. Final- 
ly, the calling device sends a discon- 
nect signal, and both units discon- 
nect from the phone fine. 

—RICHARD C- LBNECKER 



RESOURCE INDEX: BACKGROUND RECEIVE 



z.o 



BETTER 



WORSE 




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TEST LAB 




spent six hours changing the jump- 
ers in my computer, reinstalling 
the software, and fixing the prob- 
lems the process created. If 
you're considering RapidFAX, 
make sure that your fax/data 
modem card can easily be config- 
ured for COM 1 or COM 2, 

Another battle that I faced was 
finding the right fax/data modem 
type so that there wouldn't be any 
transmission errors. Generic 
Class 1 and Generic Class 2 
didn't work, so I resorted to trial 
and error. It wouldn't have been 
so bad if the changes went into 
effect right away, instead of after 
the next time the system booted. 
After a number of tries, I deter- 
mined that the BOCA 14.4 setting 
worked well (for my TwinComm 
fax/data modem.) 

If you have a fax/data modem 
card that's been around for 
some time, chances are that it'll 
be on the list. That means you 
won't encounter the same prob- 
lems I did. And if your device is 
on COfvl 1 or GOfvl 2, you won't 
have any problems with 
RapidFAX. Since there are a num- 
ber of features to recommend 
this program, take a look. It 
might be just right for you. 

Circle Reader Service Number 379 



40 



COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



ULTRAFAX 1.1 
FOR WINDOWS 

When the UltraFax window first 
appears, you'll know at a glance 
what UltraFax has to offer and 
how the program is organized. 
Five descriptive icons with labels 
such as In Box and Out Box line 
up along the bottom, giving you 
access to the main program are- 
as with a double click. At the top 
of the screen is a row of buttons. 
When the windows associated 
with these buttons are open, a sin- 
gle mouse click gives you access 
to choices such as Send, View, 
and Print. And the pull-down 
menus offer complete control 
over navigation through any part 
of the program, 

UltraFax has all the features 
you'd expect. Among them are 
scanner support, OCR conver- 
sion, multiple phone lists, and a 
viewer with graphical editing. 



urtraFax 1.1 for Windows— $49.95 

ZSOFT 

450 Franhiln Rd., ste. 100 
Marietta, Georgia 30067 
(404) 428-0008 



There isn't room to talk about all 
of these, but they reveal craftsman- 
ship and high quality. There are, 
however, several things which dif- 
ferentiate UltraFax from the other 
fax programs, and these differenc- 
es may make this package just 
what you're looking for. 

While working with ten fax pack- 
ages, i learned to appreciate 
what others might call "the littie 
things." Being able to change eve- 
ry part of the hardware setup with- 
out reinstalling the software 
became something I looked for 
right away. Since my fax/data 
modem card was new on the mar- 
ket at the time of testing, I had to 
search for just the right settings 
through trial and error. Several of 
the packages without this ability (to 
change the hardware settings with- 
out reinstalling the software) cost 
me at least an hour. And if you're 
a computer neophyte, an installa- 
tion with one of these other pack- 
ages might chew up an entire day 
My thanks to the manufacturer for 
making sure this often-overlooked 
capability was included, 

UltraFax also impressed me 
with its terrific graphical editing 
tools. ZSoft has long been one of 
the leaders in graphics pro- 
grams. Most of us, at one time or 
another, have used PC Paint- 
brush, one of the first commercial- 
quality paint programs for IBM 
compatibles, UltraFax has more 
than enough power to add a few 
nice touches to an outgoing fax 
or cover letter or to create some 






Oh no ! The Trash Al ien hss captured spot an d 
left behind a trail of litter. In Trash Zapper, 
your mer^l math skills are needed to help 
clean up the mess. 




The Number Recycler can convert trash into 
fuel but Biasternaut needs your problem- 
solving abilities to make it work. Recycle all 
the trash and you're ready to go! 




You've tracked the Trash Alien to his home 
planet. But you haven't saved Spot yet! Use your 
mental math skills to help Biasternaut calculate 
his way through the Cave ffunnergame. 



Over 1.5 million 
Math Blaster s sold! 
The world's best- 
selling math 
program just 
got better! 



Boldly Go 
Where No 
Math Pri^irani 
Has Gone More! 




niath Blaster" In Search of Spot launches the 
world's best-selling math program to a whole new 
level of learning and fun! Kids will join Biasternaut 
on an all-new action-packed adventure to rescue 
his robot pal Spot As they search the universe, 
they'll boost their mental math and problem- 
solving skills into the stratosphere! 

America's favorite math software for ten years running 
now gives parents and kids even more to [ove... 

More math content than any other program! 

Now with over 50,000 different problems available in nine 
key subject areas: Addition • Subtraction • Multiplication 
• Division • Fractions • Decimals • Percents — 
Plus two new topics: Estimation and Number Patterns. 

More fun than ever before! 

Exciting new learning games, out-of-this-world VGA 
grapliics, digitized speech, sound effects and music will 
keep kids so dazzled they'll never want to come down to 
Earth! And for even more variety, there are now two ways 
to play: focus on a single activity or take off on a mission 
that combines all four into one awesome learning adventure I 



Order Toll Free 

{800) 545-7677 or (3101 793-0600 

Suggested retail price: 
S59.95 MS-DOS 

Available at Babbage's, Best Buy. CompUSA, 
Egghead Software, Electronics Boutique, 
Software Etc, and other fine retaiiers. 




i' m On"*" 



IBM, Tandy and PC Compatibles 
Windows version available Nov. 93 

Ages 6 to 12 

"Kids have always loved Math 
Blaster, and Math Blaster: In 
Search of Spot is no 
exception. It's even better 
than its predecessors-more 
fun and more educational. " 

Rob Bixby 
Compute Magazine 



Davidson. 



Teacliing Tools From Teachers 

circle Reader Service Number 151 




TEST LAB 



nice artwork. 

All the usual tools, such as 
lines, boxes, and circles, are 
there — even a magnifying tool! 
The ability to rotate your fax 
might be just what you need if 
you'd like to send the information 
in landscape mode instead of por- 



trait. You can also view multiple 
pages to get a sense of what the 
entire fax looks like. 

Several of the packages in this 
month's roundup had an irritating 
habit of taking control for sec- 
onds at a time, and UltraFax was 
no exception. A number of times. 



I'd start clicking in other windows; 
when nothing happened, I 
couldn't resist the compulsion to 
click some more. By the time Win- 
dows regained control, there 
were enough mouse events in the 
queue to really mess things up. 
Many times the result was a com- 



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Background receiving 














• • 


• 






Background sending 














• 




• 






Receive directly to printer 














• 




• 






Class 1 compatible 














• 




• 






Ciass 2 compatible 














• 




• 






Driver for application printing 

to fax 














• 




• 






Custom cover pages 














o 




• 






Scheduling delayed fax 
transmissions 














• 




• 






OCR 














• 




• 






Scanner support 














• 




o 






Built-in phone list 














• 




• 






Import/export phone list 














•/o 




o 






Automatic fax cleanup 










LJ 




o 




o 






Change window colors 














o 




• 






Fax viewer 




^ 










• 




• 






Automatic reception 














• 




• 






Manual reception 














• 




• 






Transmission of attached files 




o 






o 




o 




o 






Graphical fax-editing tools 




• 






• 




o 




o 


O 




• =yes O=no 



42 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



SPEAK UP! 

Is there a group of hard- 
ware or software products 
you'd like to see covered In 
an upcoming Test Lab? 

Let us know by 

calling (900) 884-8681, 

extension 7010102 

{sponsored by Pure 

Entertainment, 

P.O. Box 186, Hollywood, 

California 90078). The call 

will cost 95 cents per 

minute, you must be 18 or 

older, and you must use a 

touch-tone phone. 



pletely rearranged desktop. After 
I figured out what had happened, 
it wasn't much of a problem. But 
during background operations, 
you'll have to watch out so that 
inadvertent clicks and keypress- 
es don't do something you 
hadn't intended. 

As you probably know, Win- 
dows applications all compete for 



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processor time. For this reason, I 
had to be careful while using oth- 
er applications during background 
sends to avoid stealing too much 
processor time. On rare occa- 
sions, the remote fax machine 
interpreted a delay as a transmis- 
sion error and hung up. The prob- 
lem was worst when I had so 
many applications loaded that Win- 



dows did a lot of swapping to 
disk. Except for those rare occa- 
sions, though, UltraFax sent and 
received without a hitch. 

Overall, this is a fine piece of 
software. A well thought-out inter- 
face makes this capable program 
easy to use and worthy of your 
consideration. 

circle Reader Service Number 380 



BENCHMARK TEST SCORES (ON A SCALE OF 1 0) 




OCR Conversion Aciuracy 

Resource Index: 
Background Receive 

□ Resource Index: 
Background Send 

^g Time Required to 
teS Send Fox 






"% 



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NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 43 



,95 MACH. NINETY FEE! ABOVE 

THE BBDUND. BOTH SIDES 

IBYINE TB SHDBT HIM BBWN. 

WBBNBEB IN THE ABM. KAPITAM 

AlEKANBEB ZBYEV BHIBEB HIS 

MIE-29 TB FBEEBBM 

lEFT-HANBEB. CBBIB YBB? 



On May 20, 1989 MiG-29 pilot 
Alexander Tiw pilot who wrote 

n 1 tlie book ov^^ MiG-29, 

Zuyev began AlexandX/ev. teUs 




(indiuling autkent k 
Sovi^ida^a^ing 



a desperate 
plan to steal 

the Soviet fiwif^'arrm-Bboks. 

Union's most advanced combat 
aircraft and fly it to political 
asylum. 



lUrkish air defenses to land safe- 
ly on a civilian airfield in Turkey. 

THE FINEST TECHNOLOGY 
RUBLES CAN BUY 
The plane he flew is the MiG- 
29 Fulcrum, the crown- 
ing achievement of 4^ 
Soviet aeronautics. - 

Now, with 



NOTHING WAS LOST IN THE 
TRANSLATION 
The flight model was pat- 
terned after actual Mikoyan- 
Gurevich (MiG) design specs. 



4 



So you can be 
every system 
control is 

a" 



sure that 
and every 
painstak- 
accurate, 
the way 




Shot in a life 
and death struggle with the sen- 
try, Zuyev managed to take off. 
Then, flying dangerously low to 
avoid radar, he eluded pursuing 
fighters and deadly Soviet and 



MiG-29: Deadly Adversary of 
Falcon 3.0^ Spectrum HoloByte's 
add-on to Falcon"^ 3.0, you can 
climb into the cockpit of the 
F-16's nemesis. 



down to 
the Russian-accented 
cockpit warnings. 

IT'LL TEST YOUR SKILL 
AND YOUR PATRIOTISM 

Unlike the F-16, the MiG-29 

isn't a fly-by-wire aircraft, so a 



Fbr Visa/MasterCard orders call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week: (800) 695-GAME. 
For technical questions call (510) 522-1164 (M-F: 9AM-5PM Pacific Time). 



computer never 
limits your con- 
trol inputs, whether 
inspired or foolish. 
Its twin Isotov RD-33 ♦* 
engines produce 36,600 » 
lbs. of thrust, to the F-16's 
25,000. And superb aero- 
dynamics make it control- " 
lable at low speeds and 
high angles of attack that >■ 
would have enemy pilots 

fight- 
ing to 
avoid 
a spin. 



TSiemostfear- SPECTRUM 

some opponent 

is a human 

one. With 

EBS.uptosix 

players can go 

head-to-head. HOLOBYTE 




THEY WON'T EVEN 
KNOW WHAT HIT THEM 

Your MiG's IRST (Infrared 

Search and Track) system 

can track an F-16 without 

revealing your presence on 

his threat display. So you can 

get on his six o'clock before 

he even knows you're there. •» 

Once in range, you'll be able 

to lock on to the Falcon just 

— • by turning to look at him 

^ with the MiG-29'shelmet 

mounted sight. Then call 

"pusk" (launch) as you fire 

missiles or "ogon" (firing) as 

you ventilate him with your 

computer-accurate 30mm 

gun. Either way, his plane will 

make a satisfying crunch 

when it hits the ground. 




Next lime you have an F-16 
glued to your tail, try the 
MiG-S9's"Cobra'\ 
maneuver. 



DYou 

pull up 1^^— .^^^— 

past a 90 '^ "^t^^^L ^-^ ^"'^ 
alpha ^F^ ^^9 airspeed 

climh. ^ drops rapidly; 

the F-16 zooms 
past 

THE 
ELECTRONIC 
BATTLEFIELD SERIES: 

THE ULTIMATE 
CYBER-BATTLEFIELD 

EBS is the first series of inter- 
connecting simulations. Each 
title works with the others to 
bring you closer to the real thing 



Now you can choose from multiple 
aircraft, multiple theaters, even 
which side of the conflict to fight 
on. And you can 
go head-to-head 
over a modem or 
with up to six 



S/You abruptly 

pitch the nose 

back to level 

flight. Now 

youh-e on his 

six, vnth 

a little 

score to 

settle. 




players over a 
network. It all 
begins when you add 
on MiG-29 to Falcon 3.0. 

Anything more realistic 
wouldn't be a simulation. 





Mi|INI!H>',H 




Choose your weapon. 

The Faktm is lethal at | :t^ 

long distarices. The | 

Fulcrum, deadly close- l -y' ■■• 

in. Now you can fly for > |_^yV T /^""^ijnv 
either side. f A -r-VJ_jV_'V_^ -"^ 




MiG-29 add-on requires Falcon* 3.0. AvailcAle on IBM compatibles. 



Spectrum HaloByte 




FALCON 





Tlie fight of your life 






circle Header Service Number 201 



NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion Booth 



Kids watch 

ttiemselves interact 

with virtually 

real surroundings 

when playing 

tlie inVitieo system at 

amusement 

centers and museums. 



VR for Kids 

If you happen to be near a 
family amusement center 
sometime soon, look for an In- 
Video system and give your 
kids a chance to experience 
a touch of virtual reality. 
InVideo is the first peripheral- 
free VR system for the enter- 
tainment industry — and it's 
specifically for kids. Forgoing 
the standard helmet which cre- 
ates a 3-D effect that immers- 
es you in the environment, In- 
Video is more like a mirror 
world in 2-D, where the play- 
er's live video image is cap- 
tured by a camera, trans- 
ferred digitally, and projected 




46 



into the game on a 120-inch 
TV screen. Choosing a game 
is as simple as pointing to 
and "pressing" the image of a 
button. Kids can opt to pop 
balloons while flying over tree- 
tops, tickle fish while swim- 
ming underwater, juggle plan- 
ets and asteroids while soar- 
ing through outer space, or 
dodge raining cats and 
dogs. Every move a player 
nnakes interacts with the graph- 
ics onscreen. 

InVideo creator Dean Fried- 
man also designed the first vir- 
tual-reality TV show for Nickel- 
odeon. "Eat-a-Bug," and has 
designed numerous games 
for the Nickelodeon kids' 
show "Nick Arcade." 

And although this system is 

COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



fairly basic compared to virtu- 
al reality as portrayed in sci- 
ence-fiction movies and on 
TV, Friedman expects an In- 
Video upgrade once a year. 
A haunted-house version is in 
the works. 

InVideo systems are also 
featured in numerous muse- 
ums around the world, includ- 
ing the Brooklyn Children's 
Museum in Brooklyn, New 
York; the Franklin Institute in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
the Laredo Children's Muse- 
um in Laredo. Texas; the 
North Carolina Museum of 
Life and Science in Durham, 
North Carolina; and the Eure- 
ka! Children's Museum in Hal- 
ifax, England. 

Cool Sound 

Speakers for your PC don't 
have to take up a lot of room 
and add miles of wire to your 
already-tangled cable web. 
The MM-1, part of IBM's new 
Plug 'n Run senes of modules 
and monitors, is a slim, low- 
profile sound unit that fits neat- 
ly under your monitor Inside 
the compact case are two 
five-watt speakers that deliver 
sound to please even the 
most demanding ears. 

The MM-1 works with all au- 
dio cards and features indus- 
try-standard RCA connectors, 
so there's no clutter, no desk 
space wasted, no mixed-up 
cable connections, and no 
compatibility confusion. Set 
the MM-1 under your monitor, 
plug it in, and enjoy. 

Other features include a 
built-in microphone and input 
and output jacks for accesso- 
ries (stereo headphones, aux- 
iliary microphone, video, and 
audio). 

Controls for volume, tone, 
and balance are located on a 
pop-up panel in the front of 
the unit. 

The 9.2-pound MM-1 sup- 
ports monitors weighing up to 
90 pounds. Suggested retail 
price is $187. 



Setting the Tone 

If the idea of buying a laser 
printer cartridge that's dis- 
counted 15 to 20 percent be- 
low discount-store prices and 
contains 20 percent more ton- 
er than standard cartridges ap- 
peals to you — and it should — 
then you'll also like the idea of 
getting back $5 plus your ship- 
ping costs when you return 
your cartridges to the compa- 
ny for recycling. 

Remanufactured is the key- 
word here, and Laser-Pro, an 
Illinois company, has devel- 
oped a technique to remanu- 
facture laser cartridges without 
toner leakage. The company 
can package the cartridges 
and ship them to customers 
nationwide. 

Although recycling laser 
printer cartridges Is nothing 
new, traditionally there have 
been problems with the toner 
leaking, confining remanufac- 
turers to selling only locally — 
where they can hand-deliver 
the product. According to La- 
ser-Pro, although the car- 
tridge-remanufacturing indus- 
try comprises some 3000 
small companies, about 95 
percent of the firms do busi- 
ness within a 25- to 30-mile ra- 
dius of their home bases. Not 
so for Laser-Pro and its cross- 
country business. 

If you prefer to buy new, 
you can still buy new cartridg- 
es from Laser-Pro at 5 to 10 
percent less than imported 
brands. But considering the 
environmental advantages — 
not to mention the savings — 
of buying the remanufactured 
ones, why would ycu want to? 
For more information and pric- 
ing, contact Laser-Pro, 675 
East Irving Park Road, Ros- 
elle, Illinois 60172; (800) 377- 
0551, (708) 893-2362 (fax). 

6ig-S{reen Game Playing 

Guaranteed to turn your living 
room into a game room. 
Game Blaster from Advanced 
Digital Systems is a new PC- 




These People Have In Common? 




Draft & Print is an excellent choice for a! but the most 
complicated projects. — PC Home Journal Seplember 1992 




JUMl^ UH 



riiA rijw*«w; 



■| just purchased your program, ft does 3 great job. I'm {foing 
a building remodeling and design plan, and it works well, " 

—Nicholas Spagnola York. PA 




Draft & Prkt... isn't limited to an/ particular category of 
projects. — L4 Times July 16. 1992 



Draft & Print 

The Design-It- Yourself Software for the Do-It- Yourselfer 
Q Simple TO Install 

Draft & Print was created so that you spend more lime designing than 
figuring out where to begin, You can create, edit, and print scaled 
drawings of; floor plans, landscaping, elevations, woodworking, 
architecture, mechanical, electronic schematics, printed circuit boards 
and more. It even imports and exports to other graphic programs such 
as AutoCAD! 



G Simple TO Use 

Completely voice-assisted. Draft & 
Print comes with 5 tutorials and on- 
screen help. It includes full scaling, 
editing, rotation, full color control, 
layering, area calculations and auto- 
dimensioning. 

Q Simply Terrific 

Draft & Print is the perfect design tool 
for CAD users at any level of 
expertise. Whether you're designing a 
landscaping plan, a new dream home 
or a TV entertainment center for your 
living room, you'll find Draft & Print is 
the ultimate design tool. 

G Simply THE One TO Buy 

Works on IBM and 100% compatible PC's. Supports 
CGA/EGA/VGA and Hercules monochrome 
monitors; laser printers, plotters and high res. 
output to dot matrix printers. 



i P^^T & Print 



Unlessh'fei 




Order Today By Calling 800-722-8988 

Visa and fs^asterCard accepted. Spirit of Discovery, 5421 Avenida Encinas, Carlsbad, CA 92008 

circle Reader ServJce Number 154 




"'f DiscovERy 

A publishing partnersfilp 



NEWS & NOTES 



Sound for even Ihe 

most discerning 

ears comes from 

Uie neat, 

compact MHI'l, 

uart of IBM's 

Plug 'n Run series 

of PC peripherals. 



to-video converter that allows 
you to play your favorite PC 
games on TV. Bundled with 
three popular game titles to 
get you started — Prince of Per- 
sia from Broderbund and Jet 
Fighter II and Spectre Chal- 
lenger from Velocity — Game 
Blaster is a great value at 
$169 (the suggested price). 

In addition to giving you 
the option of using your big- 
screen TV for favorite PC 
games, it's great for those al- 
ready using online services, 
such as America Online, Prod- 
igy, or CompuServe. {COM- 
PlJTEand Omni Magazine On- 
line would look great on the 
TV.) Game Blaster is compat- 




ible with all DOS applications, 
supports 640 x 480 VGA res- 
olution in 256 colors, and out- 
puts NTSC video in RCA com- 
posite and Super VHS super- 
video standards. For more in- 
formation, contact Advanced 
Digital Systems, 20204 State 
Road, Cerritos, California 
90701: (800) 888-5244. (310) 
809-6144 (fax). 

Your World Series 

Keith Hernandez, Ty Cobb, 
Willie Mays, and Shoeless 
Joe Jackson — all on the 
same team? What a lineup — 
and what a game that would 
have been — and can be with 
Baseball for Windows from Mill- 
er Associates. Using the 
most complete and accurate 
baseball statistics. Baseball 



for Windows allows you to 
manage any team you want 
and see what could have 
been some remarkable mo- 
ments in playing history. 

Bringing the all-time great- 
est teams, fields, and plays to 
life. Baseball for Windows fea- 
tures a storehouse of play re- 
sults, stunning reproductions 
of actual ballparks, an icon- 
based interface, easy-to-under- 
stand displays, built-in micro- 
managers, and special fea- 
tures — such as Advanced In- 
jury fvlanagement (AIM), 
which provides more-realistic 
electronic playing conditions 
by tracking the status of play- 
ers and determining if they're 
rested, tired, bushed, worn 
out, itchy, or benched. 

The program's four mod- 
ules (Baseball. League Manag- 
er, Advanced Draft, and Stat- 
Master) give you instant ac- 
cess to every aspect of base- 
ball. Click on the picture of 
the guy stealing, and he'll go; 
click on a player's name, and 
his past and current game 
performance will be dis- 
played. Special bench and 
bullpen reports provide key in- 
formation so you can make in- 
formed playing decisions. For 
more information, contact Mill- 
er Associates, 1 1 Burtis Ave- 
nue, Suite 200, New Canaan, 
Connecticut 06840: (203) 972- 
0777, (203) 966-7547 (fax). 

Future Standards 

The framework of today's com- 
puting world encourages 
what has become quite a par- 
adox: Developers are under 
constant pressure to add 
more features to their prod- 
ucts; and as applications be- 
come more powerful, they al- 
so become more difficult to 
use, and consequently, less 
useful to people. 

Apple Computer hopes to 
change all of that next year 
when it introduces a new com- 
puter architecture, called 
OpenDoc, that will integrate 



software and enable sharing 
across multiple platforms and 
distributed networks. In fact, if 
all goes as planned, the desk- 
top computer as we know it to- 
day will become obsolete. 

What will this mean for 
you? Easy creation of multime- 
dia docunnents, for one thing. 
You'll be able to place any 
kind Oi data into an OpenDoc 
document and edit if at will, 
without having to cut and 
paste between different appli- 
cation windows. You won't 
manually assemble the vari- 
ous pieces; instead, your 
OpenDoc document will hold 
all of them. 

OpenDoc parts will behave 
much like current applica- 
tions, enabling you to up- 
grade without having to go 
through a new learning proc- 
ess. Apple's stated intent is to 
make this technology not on- 
ly cross-platform but also tru- 
ly open — with both systems 
vendors and independent soft- 
ware vendors able to obtain 
the source code easily. 

When the company intro- 
duces it in the second half of 
1994, OpenDoc architecture 
will be available for the Apple 
Macintosh. WordPerfect and 
Novell plan to implement the 
architecture on the Microsoft 
Windows platform, and since 
it's designed to be highly port- 
able, OpenDoc will probably 
become available on other 
desktop systems such as 
UNIX, according to Apple. 
IBM and Borland have also an- 
nounced their support. Look 
for more on this in 1994. 



Companies or public relations 
firms with items suitable for 
"News & Notes" sfiould send 
Information along with a color 
slide or transparency to News 
& Notes. Attention: Jill Cham- 
pion Booth, COMPUTE, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Caroli- 
na 27408. n 



48 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



FEEDBACK 



Take the Cache 

Your answer to Fred Bell 
(May 1993) was wrong con- 
cerning cache memory. You 
said it cached information 
from the hard disk, but the 
cache associated with CPUs 
is processor cache, not disk 
cache. Processor cache is a 
bank of external high-speed 
memory — typicaliy 15- to 20- 
ns. This bank stores the most 
recent of the most often ac- 
cessed areas of RAM, deter- 
mined by a set of algorithms 
and the way the cache is de- 
signed. Additionally, every In- 
tel 486 CPU has an 8K inter- 
nal processor cache built into 
the chip. When a system is ad- 
vertised with 8K of cache, it's 
this internal cache that's be- 
ing referenced. It doesn't rep- 
resent added value. 

A processor cache makes 
a huge difference in GPU per- 
formance just as a disk 
cache makes a huge differ- 
ence in disk performance. 
DOS-based 386 and 486 com- 
puters would see this perform- 
ance increase with just 64K of 
externai cache memory. 
while these same computers 
based on 32-bit operating sys- 
tems such as OS/2 or Win- 
dows NT should have 256K 
of external processor cache 
to see the biggest perform- 
ance boost. 

You should also clarify to 
readers that 256K would be a 
rather small disk cache. My ex- 
perience has shown that a 
disk cache between 1 MB and 
2MB provides the largest in- 
crease in disk performance. A 
cache larger than 2MB is 
more or less a waste of mem- 
ory. 

One more point: Some 
game programs that use ex- 
panded memory assume that 
you don't have a disk cache 
on your system and set up 
their own disk cache. Run- 
ning two active disk caches 
at the same time can severe- 
ly degrade the performance 



of your entire system. In 
these cases, I recommend 
that you disable your sys- 
tem's disk cache and let the 
game program do the work. 

JOSEPH G SAWAYA 
SLIPPERY FiOCK. PA 

Thank you for your correction, 
your clarification, and your 
tip. 

Continuing Series 

Could you please explain to 
me the difference between a 
parallel and serial port for print- 
ers and other devices? Is 
there an advantage in using a 
serial connector rather than a 
parallel connector? 

RANDY BRAZEAU 
RIDGEVILLE. ON 

A serial connector sends one 
bit at a lime down a single 
wire. A parallel connector can 
send whole bytes at a time. 
The serial connector is more 
appropriately used in applica- 
tions where the output wilt be 
traveling down a single pair of 
wires, such as a telephone 
wire, or where the receiving de- 
vice handles your data very 
slowly, such as a printer. 

Serial cables have more 
than one pair of wires, 
though, which allows a manu- 
facturer to transmit important 
information quickly back and 
forth between the computer 
and the peripheral. That's 
why. when you're working 
with a Mac and a LaserWriter 
and the LaserWriter encoun- 
ters a problem, the Mac can 
tell you the exact nature of 
the problem. 

Until recently, parallel ca- 
bles were one-way. They 
sent Information relatively 
quickly, but when there was a 
problem at the other end of 
the cable, all your computer 
could tell you was that the out- 
put device was no longer ac- 
cepting data. On the far end 
of the cable, the printer might 
be out of paper, jammed, or 



on fire: your computer 
wouldn't have a due. A new 
parallel cable specification 
changes all of that, granting in- 
telligence to the connector A 
collection of codes can keep 
the computer (and you) in- 
formed about the progress on 
the other end of the cable. 

In summary, you'll find ap- 
proximately equivalent printer 
performance with either a par- 
allel or a serial printer be- 
cause the printer is the bottle- 
neck, not the Interface. A se- 
rial printer has the slight advan- 
tage of offering two-way com- 
munication, but parallel print- 
ers will soon share that advan- 
tage. A parallel Interface has 
the advantage of being by far 
the most common used by 
printers. And, finally, with se- 
rial mice and modems becom- 
ing more and more common, 
most people can't afford to 
sacrifice one of their two pre- 
cious serial ports to a printer 
cable. 

Amiga Notes 

I read with interest the special 
section on PCMCtA slots in 
the May 1993 issue (not avail- 
able in all editions). Despite 
the depth of the article, there 
was not a single word about 
the fact that the Amiga 600, 
1200, and 4000 all come 
equipped with standard PC- 
MCIA slots. 

ERIC NIXON 
FOREST, ON 

Just about every time we show- 
case a bit of new technology 
for the PC, we receive a hand- 
ful of letters from Amiga own- 
ers with the general theme of 
"You talk about this new tech- 
nology of (fill In the blank), but 
it's not new. It's been availa- 
ble for almost a decade on 
the Amiga. " So, as a service 
to our readers, we will pause 
now to praise the Amiga. '\/lr- 
tually every advance that you 
read about for the PC was 
built Into the Amiga: sound, an- 



Chooslns a cache, 
picking a printer port, 
acknowledging 
the Amiga, licking 
the lottenr, and 
mailing to Maxtor 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 49 



FEffiBACK 



imation, multitasking, and so forth. Com- 
modore fias a team of very forward- 
looi<ing engineers, and it builds one of 
ttie most capable desktop machines In 
the world. COMPUTE has long ad- 
mired the Amiga (and the pioneer spir- 
it of Amiga owners) and has prided it- 
self on being the mainstream computer 
magazine that has paid the most atten- 
tion to the Amiga over the years. If this 
sounds a bit like a eulogy, it is be- 
cause, after several years of publishing 
first a quarterly magazine, then a bi- 
monthly magazine, and later a month- 
ly section of COMPUTE devoted to the 
Amiga, we have ceased our regular cov- 
erage of the machine as of October 
1993. 

The Lottery 

I have written a small program to pick 
a group of six numbers ten times for 
the state lottery. Ttie program doesn't 
seem to work. 

LARRY RAY 
ALICE. TX 

In the interest of scientific inquiry, we 
will overlook our moral objections to 
gambling. Sometimes it helps to state in 
specific terms what you want a program 
to do before you write it. You want to 
draw six random numbers from among 
the numbers 1-50. The six numbers all 
have to be different from one another. If 
you select a number once, it shouldn't 
be selected again in any group of six. 
And you want to generate ten of these 
groups of six. Although you could ac- 
complish this in several different ways, 
the following program demonstrates 
what Is probably the most efficient way 
We'll create a collection of numbers (1- 
50), scramble them, draw the first six 
numbers, scramble them again, draw 
six more, and so forth. Here's the pro- 
gram. Remember that in order to get a 
winning number, you have to avoid think- 
ing about an elephant when the pro- 
gram completes its operation. 

DIM A(50j 
RANDOMIZE TIMER 
FOR I = 1 TO 50 
A(l) = I 
NEXT 

FOR J = D TO 9 
GOSUB SCRAMBLE 
GOSUB DRAWSIX 

50 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



NEXT 

PRINT "Don't llTlnk 
about an elephant." END 

SCRAMBLE: 

SCRAMBLE = RND * 1000 + 100 

FOR I = D TO SCRAMBLE 

RESCRAMBLE; 

fl = INT(RNO * 50) + 1: B = 
mT(RND " 50) +1: IFA = B 
THEN GOTO RESCRAMBLE 

A1 = A(A): A(A) = A(B): A(B) = A1 

NEXT 

RETURN 



': A(l); 



DRAWSIX: 

FOR I = 1 TO 6 

PRINT USING "## 

NEXT 

PRINT 

RETURN 

To the Max 

I have a question concerning my 
Maxtor 200MB IDE hard disk. Do you 
have the address for Maxtor? 

DON SHAW 
LUSBY MD 

The address for Maxtor Colorado is 
2190 Miller Drive, Longmont, Colorado 
80501. Its telephone number is (303) 
651-6000, or (800) 262-9867 outside of 
Colorado. Though it's a separate com- 
pany Maxtor supports Miniscribe 
drives. Incidentally, our source for 
many names and addresses is the 
1993 Computer Marketplace, an unusu- 
ally complete reference, published by 
Random House Electronic Publishing. 



Do you have a question about hardware 
or software? Or have you discovered 
something that could help other PC us- 
ers? If so, we want to hear from you. 
Call our special "feedback" line: (900) 
884-8681. extension 7010201 (spon- 
sored by Pure Entertainment P.O. Box 
186. Hollywood. California 90078). The 
call will cost 95 cents per minute, you 
must be 18 or older, and you must use 
a touch-tone phone. Or write to "Feed- 
back" in care of this magazine. Readers 
whose letters or calls appear in "Feed- 
back" will receive a free COMPUTE base- 
ball cap while supplies last. We regret 
that we cannot provide personal replies 
to technical questions. □ 



EDITORIAL 

Editor ciifen Karnes 

Art Director Robin C. Case 

Managing Editor David English 

Fealures Editor Robert BiKby 

Reviews Editor MiS^e Hudnali 

Gazette Editor Tarn Kelsel 

Entertainment Editor Denny Alkin 

Senior Copy Editor K5/en Huflmal 

Copy Editor Margaret Ramsey 

Editorial Assistant Pally Cillpam 

Contributing Editors Sylvia Graham, Eddte Huffman. 
Tony Roberts. Karen Siepak 

Interns Fhilhp Morgan Lisa Young 
ART 

Assistant Art Director Kenneth A. Hartjy 

Designer Katie Murdoch 

Copy Production Manager Terry C{ish 
PRODUCTION 

Production Manager De Potter 

Traffic Manager Barbara A. WllrarrLS 

PROGRAMMING S ONLINE SERVICES 

Manager Troy Tucki>r 
Programmors Bruce M Bov^den 
Steve Draper 
Bradley M Small 
AOMINISTRATIOtI 
President, COO Kalhy Keelon 
Executive Vice President, Wlliam Tynan 
Operations 
Editorial Director Keith Ferreil 
Operations Manager David Hen$le/ Jr. 
Office Manager Sybrl Agee 
Sr. AtJministraTive Assistant Juira rlemcng 
Administralive Assistant Ltsa G Casinger 
Recepfiontat LeWanda Fox 
ADVERTISING 
Vice President, Peter T Johnsmeyer 
Associate Publisher (2i;|49fi.€tDO 

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 

Eafil Coast: Fuil-Page ana Standard Dispiay Ads— Peter T Jonns- 
meyer, Cnris Coelho, COMPUTE Publrcations International Ltd.. 
1965 Broadway, N911 York, NY 10023; (212) .(96.6100. Soultieesi— 
Hamel Rogers, S03 A St.. SE, IWashington, D C 20003; (202) 546- 
5926. Flofida-J. M. Renter Associates. 330O fJE 192nd Si. Suite 
192. Aveniuia, FL 33180; (30S| SaS-l-WT. (3051 933-6302 (fVWl. 
Midwest— FulJ^^e and Standard Display Ads— Starr Lane. Wation- 
al Acttounts Manager; 7 Waywood Dr. Danville, IL 61832: (217) 443- 
4042, (217) 443-4043 IFAX) DBlroil-Jim Chauvin. 1400 N. 
Woodward Ave . 3ul!0 101. Bloomlield Hills, Ml 48304: (313) 433- 
1016. (313)433-1*01 (Fa«|. Northwest- Jerry Thompson. Jufos E. 
Thompson Co.. 1290 Howard Ave , Sjiie 303 Buningamo. CA 
94010. (415) 34M222. Lucilte Demis, (707) 451-6209. Soulhwesl- 
Howard Berman 6728 Eton Ave.. Canoga Rar<. CA 91303 (818) 
992-4777 ProiiLjct Mart Ads— Lucille Denn:5. Jules E Tnotrtpson 
Co., 1290 Howard Ave , Sune 303, Burlingame, CA 94O10, (707) 
451-8209. UK S, Europe Beverly Wardaiu, Flat 2. 10 Stafford Ter- 
race. London We7 BH, England: 011-471 1-937-1517. Japan- 
InlergrOJp CommumcaliOT^s, Lid,: Jiro Semba, Fresident. 3F Tiger 
Blog. 6-22 Shiba-koen. 3-Chome. Minaio ku, Tokyo 105, Japan; 03- 
434-2607 Classified ABS- Maria Manasen. 1 Woods Ct, Huntinji- 
ton NY 11743: (TEL/FAX) 1516) 757-9562. 

THE CORPORATION 

Bob Guccione (chairman and CEO) 

Kattiy Keeton (vice-chairman) 

David J, Myerson (president and C£0) 

Will am F Marlieb (president, marketing, sales and circulatjon) 

Patrick J. Gavin (senior vice president and CFO) 

Richard Cohen (executive vice president and treasurer) 

Frank DcVino (executive vice president, graphics director) 

Jim Marlise (executive vice president, circulation) 

Jen Winslon (executive vice president, corcorate sen/ices) 

Hal Halpner (vice president, director of manufactunng) 

William Tynan (vice president, technology and information 

services) 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Sr, VP/Ckjro. Oir, . New Business Deveiopmenf Beverly Wardaie: VP/ 
Dir, Group Advertising Sales Nancy Kesfenbaum: Sr, VP/South- 
em and Miawesl Adverlsing Dir : F^ter Goldsmith Offices; Ne* 
York; 1965 Broadway, New Yo-k. NY 10023-6966. Tel (212) 496- 
6100, Tele« 237128 Midwest 111 East Wackef Cr. Si.:-e 508. Oica- 
go, IL 60601; (312) 819-0900. (312) 319-0813 (FAX) South 1725 
K S:. NW. Suite 903. Washington, DC 20006, Tel. (202) 728-0320, 
West Coast: 6728 Eton Ave,, Canoga Park, CA 91303. Tel, (818) 
992-4777. UK and Europe Flat 2. 10 Slafford Terrace, London W87 
BH. Eng'ana: Tel 011-4711-937-1517 Japan intergroup Jiro Sem- 
ba. Telex J254691GLTYO Fax 434-5970 Korea: Kaya Advlsng , 
Inc, Rm 402 Kunshin Annex BID 251-1, Dohiva Dong, Mapo-Ku, 
Seoul. Korea (121). Tel 719-6906. Telex K32144Kayaad. 

ADMINISTRATION 
Sr W. CFO Ratrick J. Gavin: EVP/Cotporala Services: Jerl Win- 
ston; VP Dlieclor Safe Promotions: Beverly Grepen Dir. Ne^^sslano 
Circulation Paul Rolnick: Dir. Newsstand Ope-a^ons: Joe Gailo: 
Dir Subscriplion Circulation Beatrice J. Hanks: VP Director of re- 
search Robert Rattnar, Advertising Production Director: Charlene 
Smith; Traffic Dir: V^iliam HarbuH: Dii , Budget and Finance: Tom 
Matey: Production f^gr Tom Stinson: Assi Production Mgr,. Nan- 
cy Rice: Mgr. International Div George Rojas Exec Asst to Bob 
GucclDne: Diane O'Connell. Special Asst. to Bob Guccione. Jane 
Homiisr^ 




For more inbrnrjatiort or to order call 

l-80aWEB^EEr 

© 1 W3 Mollord Softwore, Inc. 
Circle Reader Service Number 199 




To read Kasparov's mind, 
simply refer to the second board. 




Ready to raise your game to a 
higher level, are you? Meet Garry 
Kasparov, reigning king of the 

[BEFORE] chess 

world. And your 

new private tutor. 
While you play 

Kasparovs Bambit, 

his digitized image 

and voice (Russian 

accent and all) will 

appear on your 

screen. He'll warn 

you of imminent 

danger. Ouestion 

the tactics you 

use. And constantly challenge you to seek 

out fresher and deadlier lines of attack. 

There's even a second 
board, which allows 
you to visualize the 
strategies Kasparov 



i^^H^ 










1 


1 












^^^^^^R BiB IliUi 










n 


■ 




1 


r 






l^^sm 




h 





suggests. 

You can 

also customize most aspects of your opponent's 

game, giving you 
a virtually infinite 
pool of challengers. 
To make sure 
you don't outgrow 
Gambit any time 
soon, we power it 
with the very same 
engine that won the 
1993 International 
Computer Chess 
Championship. Not 
exactly what 

you'd call a pushover. So pick it up. 

Play it. And who knows? 

After spending a few weeks or so 

learning the ropes from Kasparov, you 

may just find that you're finally 

ready to take on, well, Kasparov. [after ] 




As you improve, you can customize 
opponents to suit your game. 



KnfTpshpfi'#:8aBili1tSs a'tPsSfrmsf^of-ISffrt'^ ^ 



■■■■■:-i Ail 






YQiiDmrTi 






0VERHI6 

ITiTjUSYQU 

it COUPLE WEEKS 



mmu 



Gambit's engine won the world 
title, so watch your step. 



ELECTRONIC ARTS' 



Circle Rcadc; Sc^vtce Niimber 196 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



A badly fragmented 

hard disk 

degrades system 

performance 

liy flogging down file 

access. 



54 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 



DEFRAGMENTING 
YOUR HARD DISK 

One of the new utilities provid- 
ed with Microsoft's DOS 6 is De- 
frag. This program helps keep 
your hard disk in order, result- 
ing in faster file access and an 
improved success rate 
should you ever need to un- 
delete a file. 

Why is such a utility neces- 
sary? What causes the frag- 
mentation that Defray was cre- 
ated to cure? 

The culprit is DOS itself 
and, more specifically, the 
way it stores your files. 

When you first begin storing 
files on a newly formatted 
disk, DOS places the files one 
after anottier, starting on the 
disk's first track. It also keeps 
information about where each 
file is stored in the FAT (File Al- 
location Table). As long as 
you only add files, your disk 
will be neatly organized with 
contiguous files stored one af- 
ter the other, 

However, as soon as you de- 
lete or make changes to a file, 
you open the door to fragmen- 
tation. DOS stores files in units 
called clusters, the size of 
which depends on the size of 
your disk partition. Let's say 
you delete a two-cluster file 
from your disk. DOS updates 
the FAT to indicate that the 
two clusters once occupied 
by that file are now available 
for other use- 
Since DOS stores data as 
close to the front of the disk as 
possible, the next time you 
save a file, DOS will store it in 
the space left by the deleted 
file. 

But what if the file you're stor- 
ing is larger than two clusters? 
DOS fills the two-cluster vacan- 
cy with the beginning of the 
file and stores the remainder 
in the next available empty 
spaces on the disk. It keeps 
track of the various parts of a 
file through entries in the FAT 

1993 



When you open a file, DOS 
checks the FAT to get instruc- 
tions on where to find all of the 
file's parts and then reassem- 
bles it for you. 

DOS's ability to fragment 
files is a good thing. Other- 
wise, you could face a situa- 
tion in which you had 10MB re- 
maining on your hard disk but 
couldn't store a 2MB file be- 
cause there were no contigu- 
ous spaces larger than 1MB. 

On the downside, a badly 
fragmented hard disk de- 
grades system performance 
by bogging down file access 
as the drive head travels all 
across the disi<, rounding up 
the scattered clusters. File frag- 
mentation also makes it more 
difficult to recover deleted 
files using DOS's Undelete 
command. Undelete normally 
can recover an unfragmented 
file in a snap, but if the file is 
fragmented, it has to do some 
guesswork to reassemble the 
file because the road map to 
the file that was stored in the 
FAT is no longer available. 

Now that we've discussed 
fragmentation and discovered 
how it happens, let's look at 
what to do about it. If you 
have DOS 6, you can use the 
Defrag command. If you use 
an earlier version of DOS, you 
can get a defragmentation pro- 
gram either separately or as 
part of a disk utilities package. 
(In fact, the defragmentation 
program that comes with DOS 
6 is a version of a program cre- 
ated by Symantec, which pro- 
duces the Norton Utilities.) De- 
frag may not have ail the belis 
and whistles of other software, 
but it gets the job done. 

Defrag works on one of two 
levels. First, it can identify ail 
of the fragmented files on 
your disk and move them to ar- 
eas where they will fit contigu- 
ously. Or it can rearrange the 
files on your hard disk so that 
none is fragmented and all are 
packed together at the front of 
the disk. This latter option es- 



sentially rewrites every file on 
your disk. 

Today's defraggers have 
come a long way since the ear- 
liest versions, but because de- 
fragmenting involves your en- 
tire database, it's wise to take 
a few precautions: Have a cur- 
rent backup in case some- 
thing goes wrong, run Chkdsk 
to make sure your disk has no 
lost clusters or file allocation er- 
rors, and disable any net- 
works and multitasking soft- 
ware such as Windows or task 
switchers. 

DOS 6's Defrag requires a 
lot of memory. If you receive In- 
sufficient Memory messages, 
try to free up as much memo- 
ry as possible by eliminating 
all TSRs. If memory remains a 
problem, borrow some memo- 
ry from your graphics adapter 
using the following procedure: 
Add the parameters l=AOOO- 
BFFF and NOEMS to the CON- 
FIG.SYS command that loads 
EMM386, restart the comput- 
er, and then run the defragmen- 
tation program by typing de- 
frag /gO. 

After Defrag has finished its 
work, remove the parameters 
you added to the EMM386 
line in CONFIG.SYS. 

The AOOO-BFFF memory 
range is commoniy used by vid- 
eo cards to display graphics 
screens. This procedure bor- 
rows that block of memory for 
use by the operating system. 
The/gO switch used when start- 
ing Defrag instructs the pro- 
gram to run in text mode rath- 
er than graphics mode, avoid- 
ing a conflict over that block of 
memory. 

Once you get the hang of us- 
ing Defrag, you can automate 
the process by using DOS 6's 
multiple configuration feature 
to create a setup that runs De- 
frag. When you do this, you 
can use the /b switch on the 
Defrag command line to 
cause your system to reboot it- 
self after Defrag has finished 
doing its work. ~) 



Introducing 
PC DOS 6.1 




X 



The 

iielore you sink a penny into MS-DOS 6. ^h 

consider a better way to maximize the H i 

return on your PCs — the new PC DOS B .^^ .^~*^^M— 

6.1 Irom IBM. ■■ M^ C^ M 

Its got utilities that earn the highest I H ^T™"^ ^^^k I 

rating. The aiilomatic antivirus scan ..9^^^ ^^^^^ I^^^X B i 

detects tiearh' l«ice as nianv viruses as 

MS-DOS, while taking up a fraction of the space ^ ^™ ^ ^ 

(just I K-6K, versus 7K-44K for MS-DOS). j I J 

What's more, it's got utilities you don I gel _^ ^^^^^—^^ I ^^ ^^^_ ^^ ^»«^^ ^•^^ 

with MS-DOS. Sucli as the full-screen Program | |T I I | | I M^\ CT^ 

Scheduler and the Integrated K Editor. Full III I I I I H ^^^ 

Screen Backup gives \ou differential ^ J^ ^L j W ^^L W ^ / B ^L. ^ | ^ ^ 

A haekiip of modilied liie-s. as well a.s 

investment on 

I incremental, tape and iNetWare' file attribute 

A I backups — and it can resume interrupted 

^^r~ ^^"^^ ^ '^. backup. Also, high-speed flo|)[)y disk support 
H H H ^— ^ is two to three times faster. 
H H IW J Your mcinorv manageuietit will pay 

^■*^^^^ ""^^ ^*"^ dividends, too. The Memory 0|)timiz<T not 
only gives you more available memory, but also a configuration \vatcher 
(o help run your system more efficiently. 

And vou can bank on the best service and supjiort in the business, 
including a 21-hour helpline you can actually rea<-lu and 60 day.s of 
free supf)ort. 

To order PC DOS 6.1 , see your local software dealer. Or call 
1 800 342-6672. (In Canada. {;all 1 800 465-7999.) When you 
consider all the options, PC DOS 6.1 is the only one to pick. 



market 



Features and Functions 


PC DOS 6.1 


MS-DOS 6 


Backup— Tape support; 
High-speed 
floppy disk support 


X 




X 




Approximate number of 
viruses ttiat can be detected 


>1,400 


800 


Automated system 
configuration optimizer 


X 




PCt^^CIA 11 support 


X 




Enfianced editor 


X 




Program scheduler 


X 






:® 



IBM 15 a registered trademark of International Business Macliines Coiporalion. MS-DOS is a registered 
tfademark of lulcrosofi Corporation, NetWare is a registered lrademarl< of Novell Corp. © 1993 IBM Corp. 



WINDOWS WORKSHOP 



Clifton Karnes 



With RoboHELP 

2.0, creating 

Windows itelp files 

is a snan. 



ROBOHELP 2.0 

Last issue, I talked about how 
to get the most from Windows 
Help from a user's point of 
view. Tfiis montfi, I'm going to 
talk about creating your own 
Help files. 

Thieoretlcally, the only tools 
you need to create a Windows 
Help file are the Help compil- 
er (HC30.EXE or HC31.EXE) 
and a text editor that can pro- 
duce ASCII text files, which 
the Help compiler reads and 
compiles. The Help compiler 
comes with most development 
systems, including the Win- 




dows SDK, Visual C-I-+, and 
Borland C++. You also get the 
Help compiler with most Help- 
authoring tools. 

Although you can create 
Help source files with an AS- 
CII text editor, the Help com- 
piler's native format is RTF 
(Rich Text Format), which is a 
little frightening to work with in 
its raw form. It's much easier 
to create Help source files 
with a word processor that 
can export RTF. Word for Win- 
dows has excellent RTF sup- 
port (Microsoft invented RTF), 
and it has become the stan- 
dard for Help authors. 

Information on creating 
Help is sparse, but one excei- 
lent source is the Microsoft 
Help Authoring Guide, a Help 
file itself that explains Help file 
creation. It's available on the 
Windows SDK forum on Com- 
puServe and on the Microsoft 
Developers Network CD. I 
haven't mentioned the MSDN 
CD before, but it's an indispen- 
sable tool for all Windows de- 
velopers and professionals. It's 



a quarterly CD-ROM that 
boasts the entire hypertext doc- 
umentation of the SDK, Visual 
C++, Petzold's Windows 3.1, 
and scores of other references. 
It also has lots of programs and 
useful information, including 
the Help Authoring Guide and 
other Help-authonng aids. 

Back to creating Help. Us- 
ing a word processor like 
Word for Windows instead of 
a text editor makes creating 
Help files easier, but it's still 
hard work. You have to put in 
the codes for topics, jumps, 
and graphics all by hand. And 
after you've saved your file, 
you have to compile it with the 
Help compiler, wiiich, amazing- 
ly, is DOS based. 

After you've gotten your 
feet wet with creating a few sim- 
ple Help files, you'll begin to re- 
alize that this should be easi- 
er than it is. 

Coming to the rescue is 
Blue Sky Software with Robo- 
HELP 2.0 (619-459-6365, 
$495), This program is a su- 
perb tool that turns Word for Win- 
dows into a Windows-based in- 
tegrated development environ- 
ment for Help, much the way Vis- 
ual C++ and Visual Basic are 
integrated deveiopment environ- 
ments for programs. 

Everything that has to do 
with Help file creation and main- 
tenance is automated with 
RoboHELP. The program in- 
stalls a floating toolbox in 
Word and adds several items 
to Word's menus. To build a 
topic, you simply click on the 
Topic button. The program 
prompts you for titles and key- 
words. Creating a jump is just 
as easy. You click on the 
Jump button, and RoboHELP 
asks you where you want to 
jump. Creating pop-ups is a 
snap, too, 

RoboHELP also has excel- 
lent support for embedded 
graphics, so managing BMP 
and MRB files is easy In fact, 
you can do just about every- 
thing you'll ever need to do 



with a Help project from Robo- 
HELP without ever having to 
write a line of code. If you're fa- 
miliar with creating Help files, 
you'll know all about the Help 
project file, which has an HPJ 
extension. With RoboHELP 
you'll probably never have to 
edit this file by hand. 

One area in which Robo- 
HELP really shines is Help mac- 
ros. As you may know, the 
Help engine provides a set of 
macros that you can use your- 
self, (These macros should re- 
ally be called functions. The 
macro name probably comes 
from the fact that Windows 
Help was developed by the Ex- 
cel group,) These macros do 
things like print the current top- 
ic, set bookmarks, and the 
like. When you tell RoboHELP 
you want to embed a macro, 
it automatically supplies a list 
of all the available macros. 
You simply click on one, and 
RoboHELP puts the code in 
your Help document. 

When it's time to compile, 
you just click on the Compile but- 
ton, RoboHELP runs the DOS- 
based compiler engine in the 
background, gathers any error 
messages, and displays them 
in a window for you. You never 
have to see a DOS screen. In 
fact, unless you knew other- 
wise, you'd probably never 
guess that the Help compiler is 
a DOS program. 

When you compile, if you 
find errors. RoboHELP will dis- 
play the error messages and 
offer you a short explanation 
of what each error message 
means. If you've tried to deci- 
pher Help compiler error mes- 
sages before, you know what 
a boon this is. 

After you've successfully 
compiled your program, you 
can run it from Word by click- 
ing on another button on Robo- 
HELP's toolbox. If you're get- 
ting the impression that this 
program is wonderful, you're 
right. Creating Help just 
doesn't get any easier. H 



56 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



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Tom Campbell 



Spreadsheets have 

a seductive 

immediacy about 

them because 

tiiey show results 

Instantly. 



DI-OGIX: BETTER 
THAN I THOUGHT 

One of the great pleasures of 
being a coiumnisi is that I get 
to see software I'd otherwise 
miss. A perfect example is di- 
ogix from On Top Systems 
{P.O. Box 676, Northbrook, Il- 
linois 60065-0676; (708) 291- 
0214). It's billed as application 
development software with a 
spreadsheet, support for mul- 
tiple printers, Btree database 
manager with support for 
dBASE and ASCII files, porta- 
bility to UNIX systems, and an 
advanced report writer. It's a 
character-based environment 
without mouse support, and it 
looks and feels like a spread- 
sheet all the way through. 
With its $99.95 price for a sin- 
gle-user DOS version up 
through $249.95 per UNIX us- 
er, I figured that each person 
who used di-ogix applications 
(as opposed to the developer, 
who wrote them) had to buy a 
copy. If programmers had to 
sell all the applications they de- 
veloped using di-ogix with 
what was effectively a $100.00 
runtime charge per copy, it 
seemed overpriced despite 
the low single-user cost. I 
didn't notice this clear state- 
ment on the brochure: "Appli- 
cations may be distributed 
with di-ogix runtime royalty- 
free." 

This is an interesting prod- 
uct because in 1993, it will 
probably appear to pundits as 
a good five years behind the 
times. Without Windows sup- 
port or its own GUI or graphi- 
cal print preview or require- 
ment of 75 megabytes of disk 
space (would you settle for 2 
megs plus change?), di-ogix 
would seem to be a product 
out of a distant era. Yet its use- 
fulness was immediately clear 
to me. The phenomenal ap- 
peal of spreadsheets has pro- 
duced a vast army of people 
who are programmers but 



who don't think of themselves 
that way Spreadsheets aren't 
terribly difficult to learn. Typi- 
cally, they're in a matrix layout, 
with columns given the names 
of successive letters across 
the top (the first column is A, 
the second is B, and so on). 
Rows are given numbers start- 
ing with 1 . Spreadsheets think 
most naturally in numbers, so 
to enter a number, you just 
move the highlight (a cursor 
that normally fills one cell at a 
time) and start typing. To ap- 
ply a subroutine called an 
©function (pronounced "at 
function") to those cells, you 
use the name of the formula, 
which normally starts with an 
@ sign. For example, to add 
up all the numbers in the first 
three cells of the first column 
(A1, A2, and A3), you'd type 
in, say, cell A4 the ©function 
@SUrv1{A1 ..A3). You can com- 
bine normal math operators 
such as + and - and ©func- 
tions into formulas. You can en- 
ter text in cells and use formu- 
las that act on text. There are 
built-in ©functions for just 
about everything, and the 
spreadsheet also lets you dis- 
play numbers using different 
formatting. Dates, for exam- 
ple, are normally stored as num- 
bers but are formatted for dis- 
play via a date formula as 
dates. 

Last but not least, spread- 
sheets have a seductive imme- 
diacy about them. Because 
they show the results of formu- 
las instantly, they allow you a 
lot more experimental latitude 
than pencil and paper, promot- 
ing insane bouts of fiddling 
with mortgage payments, pro- 
ject schedules, and even 
small database applications. 

While the ©function ap- 
proach isn't elegant, millions 
of people know if by now. 
Once you've learned spread- 
sheet basics, there's little else 
to trip you up. This product 
capitalizes on spreadsheet 
strengths and goes the spread- 



sheet one further by giving the 
user all the tools necessary to 
create stand-alone applica- 
tions for anything from a pro- 
tected-mode 386 to an 8088 di- 
nosaur. There are ©functions 
for advanced data entry (long 
a spreadsheet bugaboo), men- 
us, relational database work 
far beyond what spreadsheet 
users are accustomed to, file 
and disk access — everything 
a developer needs. (Almost. 
The debugger costs extra, but 
you can get by without it if 
you're underbudgeted.) Even 
if you don't knov/ spread- 
sheets or if you've found BA- 
SIC or C too hard, you'll find di- 
ogix capable of producing 
significant works with only a 
few weeks of study. If you 
know spreadsheets, that time 
estimate will drop to a few 
days. This program has the 
best tutorials I've ever seen on 
a commercially released prod- 
uct; they make up an entire 
training manual and provide 
step-by-step examples of all 
its major features, If you find 
learning software difficult be- 
cause manuals take too much 
for granted, the di-ogix train- 
ing manual will be a revelation. 
The reference isn't quite as 
close to the mark. It's underin- 
dexed and lacking in some 
information (such as details on 
file formats, which the tech peo- 
ple happily provided), and it's 
sprinkled with gaseous "inspi- 
rational" epigrams that did 
nothing to improve my reading 
experience. Ironically, the sam- 
ple applications are OK but 
not nearly up to the product's 
potential. 

This product is up to just 
about any small business, char- 
itable organization, or club 
task, and you can give away or 
sell your programs with a free 
runtime version that's included 
in the price. If you've found 
traditional programming lan- 
guages too complex or slow, 
take a long, hard look at di- 
ogix before you give up. O 



58 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



cDnnpuTE's 

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BENny is a batch file 

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Turn Program 
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TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecker 



Running a one-line 

BASIC program 

from Windows and 

using your 

{(eyboard as a 

tvnewriter 



60 



Windows One- Liners 

Windows is great for doing al- 
most everything. But thiere are 
plenty of times I know a DOS 
shortcut that could save 
some steps. Or often, I just 
feel more comfortable doing 
something from DOS. But us- 
ing these options usually 
means running the DOS 
prompt, doing what I need to 
do, and then typing exit to re- 
turn to Windows. 

I've devised an easier way. 
I use QBASIC to perform the 
DOS function and use the 
nice features Windows has to 
make it easy to call. 

Start by running QBASIC, 
typing in the program I've writ- 
ten called DODOS. BAS, and 
saving it. Just for your own 
reference, I saved it to my 
C:\DOS directory. You don't 
have to do exactly this, but in 
my instructions later, I explic- 
itly name this as the place 
where I saved it. If you save it 
to a different directory, make 
the substitution when follow- 
ing the directions to set up 
the Windows icon. 

PRINT "Enter your one-line DOS 
command (or Enter to abort)" 

INPUT A$ 

IFAS = ""GOTOOUTOFHERE 

SHELL AS 

PRINT "Press any key to return to 
Windows ..." 

GETKEY: 

AS = INKEY$ 

IF AS = "*' GOTO GETKEY 

OUTOFHERE: 

SYSTEM 



With the BASIC program 
saved, go to Windows. Pick 
the window in which you 
want the DOS command icon 
to appear. I used the Acces- 
sories window. Click in this win- 
dow, and go to the Program 
Manager's File menu and se- 
lect New. Make sure the Pro- 
gram Item button is selected 
when the dialog appears. 
Click on the OK button. 

COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



For my description I typed 
in Single DOS Command. For 
my command line I typed in 
qbasic /run c:\dos\dodos. has. 
For my working directory I 
typed in c:\dos. It's important 
to note here that the BASIC 
code and the QBASIC pro- 
gram are both in my C:\DOS 
directory. If either is different, 
change the command line en- 
try accordingly. 

The last thing I did was to 
make the BASIC program 
easy to use by entering in a 
shortcut key I pressed Shift- 
Ctrl-D. Anytime I want to run a 
single-line DOS command, all 
I do is press Shift-Ctrl-D, and 
it runs the BASIC program. 

When the program runs, it 
tells me to type in the line I 
v/ant to execute (or I can 
press Enter to skip it). The 
command is executed, and 
then I press a key to return to 
Windows, It's ail much easier 
than using the DOS prompt. 

ELMER W. ALLISON 
APO 

Graphic Boxes 

WordPerfect 5.1 's cross-refer- 
ences feature (Alt-F5, 1) 
gives you a great way to cite 
page numbers of specific 
points in a long document. 
You do have to be careful 
where you put a cross refer- 
ence. You cannot, for exam- 
ple, put a cross reference in 
the text area of a graphic 
box. But you can reference 
graphic boxes by placing a 
page-number Target refer- 
ence (Alt-F5. 1, 2) in the graph- 
ic box caption. 

If page space forces the 
graphic box to bump to a fol- 
lowing page, the page-num- 
ber reference will still be gen- 
erated correctly. 

WILLIAM WOLFE 
CHAMPAIGN, IL 

More Typewriting 

In the June 1993 issue you 
have a tip that makes your key- 



board into a typewriter. It 
works pretty well, but there's 
another way that works well, 
too. 

At the DOS prompt type 
copy con prn and press En- 
ter. From that point on, what 
you type will be sent to the 
printer. Once you're done, 
press F6 and Enter. 

EDGAR F GARWOOD 
HUDSON. FL 

Path Additions 

Sometimes I want to add a di- 
rectory to my path for a short 
while, i used to simply retype 
my path statement with the ad- 
dition. After doing that far too 
many times, I discovered a 
better way in the form of two 
batch files. The first one, 
called ADDPATH.BAT, adds 
a single directory to your 
path statement. The second 
one, called RFSTPATH.BAT 
restores the path to whatever 
it was before you ran ADD- 
PATH.BAT the last time. 

This only works correctly if 
you add and restore in pairs, 
fvlake sure your path in AU- 
TOEXEC ends with a semico- 
lon. Any semicolon you type 
when adding to your path will 
be ignored. Here is the listing 
for ADDPATH.BAT 

©ECHO OFF 

SET OLDPATH=%PATH% 

SETPATH=%1%PATH% 

Here is the listing for REST- 
PATH.BAT 

@ECHO OFF 

SET PATH=%OLDPATH% 

THOMAS E MINES III 
KANSAS CITY. MO 

Personal BacJtups 

Running complete backups is 
very time-consuming. I've writ- 
ten a batch file called 
QBACK.BAT to back up only 
my personal data files. It's 
quick, and the backups fit on 
a single high-density floppy 



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Circle Reader Service Number 30t 



3e to. ^K 



TIPS & TOOIS 



disk. Modify it to suit 
own needs. 



your 



©ECHO OFF 

ECHO Place backup disk 

ECHO in drive A. 

PAUSE 

PKZIP -BC -U A:\ROOT C:\*.* 

PKZIP -BC -U A:\WININI 

C;\WINDOWS\MNI 
PKZIP -BC -U A:\WORKS 

C:\MSWORKSV.W?? 
PKZIP -BC -U A:\GRAFFIX 

C:\GRAPHICS\*.c?? 

You must have tiie program 
PKZIP located somewhere 
in your path. The -U switch 
processes only new or mod- 
ified files. The -BC switch 
makes PKZIP use drive C 
for its temporary files so 
that the entire space of the 
floppy can be used 



The result is a floppy with 
ZIP files containing the files 
I need to save. They're only 
the latest versions of the 
files on my hard drive, 

ALEX FREIBERC5 

SOUTH YARRA, AUSTRALIA 

Finding Your Roots 

Here is a little tip that I have 
found useful. Some pro- 
grams that I run either 
change directories or need 
them changed before run- 
ning. I wanted a good way 
to return to the same direc- 
tory I started from. 

I have seen several tips 
in the past that suggested 
saving the directory using 
the CD command and then 
using Debug to shorten the 
outputs, thus creating a 
batch file containing one 



line that had the current 
drive and one line that had 
the current directory with 
CD \ before it. 

So with that idea in mind, 
I wrote SAVf piR. 

debug savedir.com 

File not found 

-el DO b4 19 cd 21 DO 06 30 01 

-e1D8 b4 47 bZ 00 be 38 01 cd 

-ellO 21 bb 38 01 43 80 3f 00 

-e118 7f fa c6 07 Od 43 c6 07 

-e120 Oa 43 c6 07 24 b4 09 ba 

-e128 30 01 cd 21 M 4c cd 21 

-e 130 41 3a Qd Oa 43 44 20 5c 

-RCX 

CX 0000 

:38 

-W 

Writing 0038 bytes 

■Q 

When you run Checksum on 



this program, you should 
see the number 04660 on 
your screen. {The latest 
Checksum program can be 
found in the July 1993 "Tips 
& Tools.") 

Here is a sample batch 
file that might use it. 

©ECHO OFF 
SAVEDIR > 
C:\BAT\RESTDIR.BAT 
D: 

CO \WP51\D0CS\AR\MAR93 
WP REPORT.WP 
RESTDIR 

When I exit WordPerfect, I 
am returned to the directory 
that I started in on the drive 
that I started from. The 
batch file above assumes 
that I have a directory 
named BAT that is in my 




path. I! creates a batch file 
with DOS redirection that lat- 
er it invokes to return to that 
exact place. 

BRADLEY M, SMALL 
GREENSBORO. MC 

One-Line Time 

I get tired of having my com- 
puter stop for a new time en- 
try each time I type time at 
the command line. Usually, 
I don't want to set the time. 
I just want to know what 
time it is. 

Here's a QBASIC pro- 
gram I use in place of my 
Time command. It's called 
TIME.BAS. 

PRINT TIMES 
SYSTEM 

Then I created a batch file 



called TBAT, which I 
placed in my DOS directory. 

QBASIC /RUN TIME.BAS 

Whenever I want the time, I 
just type f and press Enter. 
Since QBASIC also has a 
DATES function, you can eas- 
ily adapt this tip to print the 
date without DOS pausing 
for input afterward. 

ROBERT BlXSy 
GREENSBORO, NC 

Even Less Time 

Not satisfied with the previ- 
ous tip, which causes the 
QBASIC screen to flash be- 
fore the time is displayed, I 
came up with the following 
set of batch files that dis- 
play the time and date with- 
out going through BASIC. 



The first set is for MS- 
DOS, and the second set 
works with 4D0S. 

Here is TDOS.BAT which 
displays the time if you are 
using MS-DOS. 
@SET OP=%PROIVIPT% 
©SET PROMPT=STS_ 
©SET PROMPT=%OP% 

Here is DDOS.BAT which 
displays the date in MS- 
DOS. 

©SET OP=%PROIVIPT% 
©SET PROMPT=$D$_ 
©SET PR0MPT=%OP% 

Here is T4D0S.BAT which 
displays the time in 4D0S. 

©echo %Jime 

And finally, the following pro- 



gram is D4D0S.BAT which 
can be used to display the 
date in 4D0S. 

@ecfio %jiate 

BRADLEY M SMALL 
GREENSBORO. NC 



If you have an interesting tip 
that you think would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, 
and Social Security number 
to COMPUTE'S Tips & 
Tools, 324 West Wendover 
Avenue, Suite 200. Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408. 
For each tip we publish, 
we'll pay you $25-$50. All 
tips submitted become the 
property of General Media 
hternational. 3 



m 

i 




THE ONLY THING 

IT DOESN'T SIMOUTE 

IS EAR POPPING. 




If ic were any more real, your 
chair would be in a 30° bank. Our 
new Adicrosoft" Flight Simulator" 
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Microsoft 



Microsoit 



®©Ol'==^^«»»" 



*rvcw Vifk Jiid Pins Kcncn'irnhanDcrnenr^coTnmjiihis fall, ® IWlMianwifrCmp. AlEnjiJiiircM-t^vd.MictoMifi isaicgiiicrcd trajit-iiijikof M)cnJMiliC*ir|i. 
Pijht Sinmljior u 3 tiaJ^Hait of Smce A, Anwick, 



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zaa ■ I 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



How can you find out 
your hanl drive 
type when you lose 
your setup? Use 
Norton's Dishedit to 
find that hard- 
to-trace information. 



CMOS FAILURE 

I got a letter from a reader in 
Sioux City, a fellow named 
Chuck Rearden. Chuck had a 
common problem: Something 
had blown away his system's 
setup information, and he 
didn't know where to get the in- 
formation to restore it. 

The best solution to this 
sort of problem, as it turns out, 
is fairly simple (but not obvi- 
ous), so I thought I'd share it 
with you. 

"I did something dumb, 
and now I'm paying for it," 
Ctiuck told me in his letter. "In 
the cold of our dry South Da- 
kota winter, I walked into my of- 
fice and touched the case of 
my PC. I felt the shock of a stat- 
ic zap jump from my finger to 
the PC's case, and when I 
turned my PC on. my worst 
fears were confirmed. 

"I got a message saying 
CMOS memory checksum fail- 
ure, press F1 to continue. I 
didn't know what that meant, 
but it didn't look good. So I 
pressed F1, but then all I got 
was a message saying disk 
boot failure." 

By the time I got Chuck on 
the phone, it was three weeks 
after the date of his letter. He'd 
progressed a bit. In three 
weeks. Chuck had learned 
what a CMOS memory check- 
sum failure is. 

"I've found out that I've got 
to fix the CMOS information 
with a program called Setup, 
which is built into my comput- 
er," he explained. "I can only 
get into it when booting the sys- 
tem; if I press the Delete key, 
the Setup program appears, 

"It needs to know a bunch 
of information about the com- 
puter, but most of it's pretty sim- 
ple. It wants to know the date 
and time, and that I can han- 
dle, and even filling in the 
type of floppy drives isn't too 
hard — the dealer helped me 
out with that. I didn't touch the 
display type, as it said VGA/ 



PGA/EGA. I left it untouched, 
even though I've got Super 
VGA, because there wasn't an 
option for Super VGA, and the 
dealer told me to leave it as is, 

"What stumps me, and the 
dealer too, is the drive type. Set- 
up needs to know the number 
of cylinders, sectors, and 
heads, and the write precom- 
pensation — whatever that is — 
for the hard drive. I don't 
know the information, and the 
dealer. . .doesn't, either. So 
we're stuck until I can find out 
how the drive's laid out," 

One of the more annoying 
events in any PC support per- 
son's life (or any PC owner's 
life} is dealing with a four- or 
five-year-old computer that's 
lost its setup information (also 
known as its CMOS data). The 
CMOS includes data that is, in 
general, easy to retrieve — 
what kinds of floppy drives 
you've got and how much mem- 
ory is in the system. 

But losing the CMOS does 
cause one major problem: 
You lose the drive type informa- 
tion. Setting up the CMOS 
again for a hard drive requires 
that you know four things 
about a drive: how many read/ 
write heads in the drive, how 
many cylinders on the drive, 
how many sectors on each 
hard disk track, and which cyl- 
inder to start doing write pre- 
compensation on (don't worry 
about write precomp). 

Sometimes you'll lose your 
setup information by overwrit- 
ing it or by some electrical or 
mechanical mishap, but most 
commonly the CMOS is lost be- 
cause the battery that main- 
tains the CMOS information 
runs out of power — usually 
about three to five years after 
you've purchased the comput- 
er. If the CMOS's battery los- 
es power, then the CMOS for- 
gets what it knows about your 
system. When you power it up, 
the computer detects that the 
CMOS's battery is dead and 
says, in effect, "I have no idea 



what kind of equipment is in 
me — what kind of floppies, dis- 
play, hard drive, or even the 
date or time. If you press F1, 
then I'll take the best guess 
that I can." Unfortunately, its 
best guess about hard drive 
type is that there's no hard 
drive at all. Since the system 
thinks that there's no hard 
drive present, it only tries to 
boot from the floppy. The flop- 
py drive, however, probably 
doesn't contain a bootable flop- 
py, so the boot-failure mes- 
sage appears. 

Many people find that 
when the battery gets low, the 
date and time are fine, but the 
other CMOS information is 
gone. That's fairly common. 
The clock is maintained by a 
simple clock circuit, but the oth- 
er information is maintained by 
a memory circuit. Memory cir- 
cuits draw more power than 
clock circuits, so it's quite rea- 
sonable for the clock to con- 
tinue to keep fairly accurate 
time despite the loss of the 
CMOS memory, 

Anyway back to solving the 
problem. As the computer is 
about four or five years old 
(which is. again, the life expec- 
tancy of the average CMOS 
battery), you've probably mis- 
laid the documentation (if you 
ever got it in the first place) 
about the hard disk. How are 
you to find out the disk's ge- 
ometry? (For geometry, read 
ttie number of heads, cylin- 
ders, and sectors.) 

One surefire approach is to 
take the cover off the comput- 
er, remove the hard disk, and 
look for a model and serial num- 
ber, like XTOR-TECH model 
E425523-SW. You'd then find 
the number for the hard disk 
maker, call, and ask what the 
geometry of the hard disk is. 
There are, however, two prob- 
lems with this method. The 
first problem is that it's a pain 
in the neck to have to remove 
the drive, find a phone num- 
ber for the vendor, and try to 



64 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Upon purchase of a 



Sega CDsystem 



there may be a few questions you ask yourself i^^ 



about the future interdependency 




of man and machine. 




and our peculiar human desire 






force yourself to get over any 



philosophical crap 



quickly, and just play 



the coolest system 



ever made. 



The CO now comes to your video screen. And it's carrying with it about 200 times more digital storage 
space than cartridges can. What this means is that with the new Sega CD™game system, video games can now feature 
true video action of real people and real scenes. It also means that animation is crisper than ever. And Sega CD 
games can have more levels than are possible with cartridges. In fact, Sega CD is a real CD player that gou can hook 
up to gour stereo to play your music CDs. For video games, the Sega CD system uses this audio capability to create 




.e^fP^rrounding CD-quality sound that surpasses any other game system. It's no wonder that the coolest sound 
effects aod most original stereo sound tracks ever are now available in games for Sega CD. With a sleek, new design 
and simple on-screen controls, Sega CD does for video games what CDs did for your mom's scratchy music collection. 
Yet, Sega CD is more affordable than you probably thought. It even comes packaged with Sewer 5hark!"the best- 
selling TruVideo™ action/adventure game. So turn the page. And enter the next level. 




Is controlling the fate of actual persons 

with a small black box 

foreshadowing a future when we are merely pawns 

in some technical wizard's sick dream? 







GROUND ZERO, TEXAS " In a small Texas 
town, alitns iisguisii ns ftumnns threaten tht 
planet. Thii JmV idea" interaitive nf\oiie game 
puts [/ou Hi ground lera jar inimiible ailion. 
You control the plot and the juturioj mankind. 



SEWER StikRK" Full action, reahideo. tniiract one-on-one 
with ace tunnel-jackeij Gtmsf and the devious, fat-faced 
Stenchler, as you nmigate Ikroagh post-nuclear subter- 
ranean sewer tunntti infested with ferocious, realln nasty 
radiottctiii HatigatarsT Yuck, sounds like abiast. 



PRIZE FIGHTER" 6d toe-ta-iae with four 
hours, all the way to the Championship haul. 
Amaiing firsl-pirson, TruVideo" boxing 
action, with control and speed that sets new 
standards for interactive vfdfo gamiplay. 



No, bonehead. 



It's just some really bent fun, that's all. 




REBElASSAUlT~(JV[li;islonJs/ifng 3-D graphics, digi- 
tized speech and original CD score. Full motion lidto from the 
Star Wars'^ movies. Control three differpnt Stflf Wars vehi- 
cles, and save the Federation. And mag the best man, or 
mutant, or whatever the heck you find in outer spatp, wilt. 







MICnDCQSM"(Psygna5is)^ daiiUng animation triumpfi, 
with tans of incredible graphics and extraordinary sound, 
including an original CD soundlratk 61; fticd Waktman. This 
is no jamf — it's o rintmatic advjntuft and a strugglt for 
(otilrsl, inside a living human being. 



Is It live, or is it a game? As the 

line blurs between reality and video 
games, you realize: This is Ihe inter- 
active video everyone's been talking 
about and waiting lor. And it's here 
now. 5ega CD'"niakes it possible to 
interact with real viilco, of real pea- 
pie, in real, lile-like situations. It's 
like being at the movies, gnly you 
control the outCDme. look over your 
gloves and trade punches with a live 
boxer — not a cartoon. Joe Montana 
helps you choose your next play. 
Vanquish the alien invaders of a small 
Texas town. You direct the action from 
Ground Zero. The possibilities are 
limilless. These games here? They're 
just the beginning. 




JDE MONTANA NFL FDOTBAir Zooming 3-D play views, 
all 2S NFL teams and stats, plus yaar own rruVidfo" 
Joe Montana to help i/ou call youi next plug. And the best 
thing is, you don't have to get traded to Kansas Citg in 
order to play. Just kidding, we love KC. 




MAD DOG McCREE" (Ameriian Laser Games) l^ou get la 
Irg to autshoot real Western outlaws in cxtiling real video 
gunfighls in this interactive saga of the Old West. This best- 
selling action game is now available on Sega CD. Ij gou 
want to frnow what it 'ftels' like to be a cowboy, this is it. 




Could artificial sensory stimulation 

ever became so intense that 

It requires extreme new levels 

of personal protection? 





iltmHi 0DIPH\N'" Acclaimed for its graphk achievements, this adyentun 

same comes to CD with more Imis, an orisinal CD-qualitg score ond Qsouni" 
3-D audio which means it's so sophisticated only dolphins can hear it, Nat. 




STELLAR FIR£"|Dynamix) fast, exciting battle action in space. Unique poly- 
gon-based 3-D bailigrounds, hot CD music an cverg lent and amaiing special 
effects. And you'd better hold on, this one's a heck ofaridt. 




AH-3 THUNDERSTRIKE-IJVC) Sega CD's scaling and rotation creates the 
fastest action and most realistic scialling terrain outside the arcade. This is 
the state-of-the-art 3-D kiUcopler simulation game. Or is it simulation? 




FINAL FIGHT CD™ The brawling arcade classic viitb six no-meicy levels ofcrime- 
fightiny action. A Sega CD exclusive for fighting game fans. But be careful 
becaase, as the name implies, this is a no holds barred fight to the very fnd. 



Yeah 



to fend off everyone else who wants to play it. 




K»i#: Pifik-huRting polar b^ar 
«i7Ad predator with J«bdly 
claws on fr^iK and reiirl«<|,s 



■©J 




JURASSIC PARK" for Sega CD." Fompd palp- 
ontologist Dr. Robert 1. Bntdcr guidsj i;oii 
t/iroug/i the challenges and dnngfrs in TruVidso."' 
Niom-stgte action and arivfnturp with original 
music and QSound.'" 



Talk about visual stimulation: Now you can 

experience retlnally Intoxtcallog video and animation, 
and more playing levels thati ever before possible. Talk 
about audio stimulation: Sega CD™games with QSound 
blow you away with Intensified music tracks and 
sound effects with 3-D sound processing. It puts you 
right in the middle of the action you're directing. So 
quit talking about it. Ysu need to get down to tlie store 
and try out this system in person. Because while Sega 
[Q may represent the future, it's up and running right 
now, with a new world of iligital, interactive action 
games, adventure games, sports games and more. 
Warning: If at first it's too intense, don't panic. Just 
hit 'pause," count to ten, and remember how mellow 
video games used to he. 




BATMAN'" RETURNS for the true Batman'" 
afitionfldo, three different and complete games 
with the caped crusader: Arcade-style combat 
levels, plus 3-0 Bntmntilf'otid Bnlsti"" driving 
levels. Holy action-oriented. 





"Wow!! ... The Batman"' Returns Sega CD"'game scores a perfect 10 on the 

^^ drooiometer... the scaling has to be seen to be believed ...this is what CD is 

all about. Incredible, unbelievable and a must buy!" 

W Die Hard GAME FAN Magazine 

; "Sega CD's got ... a hundred-miles-per-minute, white-knuckled, rollercaaster 

ride! Sewer Shark"' is guaranteed to thrash you, your Genesis^'and your CD!" 
H I GAMEPRD Magazine 

"If you thought Night Trap"'' was terrific, wait until you see Sewer Shark." 

Glenn Rubenstein, At the Controls 

>>i--. "With Dracuta^ Sega is going to move a bazillion 5ega CDs real quick, as this 

game truly does break new ground." -^ 

m^mmmm l i Die Hard game fan Magazine 

"This incredible version of Final Flght'^'is finally available on the Sega CD! 
All the stages from the arcade have been faithfully redone along with a [am- 



min' COsoundtrack. 



Electronic Gaming Monthly 



The long-awaited CD version of the hit revolutionary game Etto™ ... (is) ... 

done with incredible DSound™.. the music is quite superb ... the sound effects 

are great ... It's for Sega CD owners everywhere!" ^^S^I^^S^^: 
" j Electronic Gaming Monthly ^fe 







m^^^ 



Wmm 






I, Sfg> CD. WiliDmrTd Ihc Niil Inir, TruVidn 



[ litlES art tiidtiniiks of SIUAunlrss othirviisE nutd failgw. Gimi siricns shown 
Uriunil Zero, Im« arc prailatiii faij Digitil fitlurEs. Ini. ItrSEBA. OSaunil ii itridimirk of Aiili.r 
und lid. ©1S93 SuAv briKmniialiiins, In:. AddiliDnillg liicnsed under nneit more of the rillowing 
paltaK: US numben 5,045.157, inif S,1 DS,1G2 end tarrespending (ireijn pilems. Atl riglil; reservEd . Siwet Shark is dliliibuted bu Sang Inageufl Sewer 
Shirk was developed lig Digital Piilures, lei. Sewer Shark is a iredemark nl Hasbro, Inr. Ju»Mi, Pjrk™* ©I 99] UnI.ersil Cilg itudioj, Inr. Amblln Enleilainmenl 
In.. Uiensed bg M£a'Uni«er.al Mirikandising. Ini. All rigbis ristr.ed. NFlteam names, lo,os,and tielmel design are riiKlered Irademarks o< Ihi NFL and its' 
Member Cl.t,. Fi,.l fight ©1 999 taprom. All.ighls KSenred. Bwrtgranmi.d f leal FigM gam, ©1553 SEBA-AH-S Ibunderslrik,™ i ® t99Kore Design Ltd 
al9S3 ll/t Mosiial Indostiiis, loi.,©1 !3J, All riglits reserved. Used under aoiboriiatlun. Batman ami ill related elemtms are prnperleel DC C»iis In,™ i 
,}^'S^l"^^!'"'^"'^h^^'''''". ."i"""""'''''"'''"'.™'" li""" 1'°" Psusn"!' Ll"i'" S' !S] Psggnesii (imiled. PsggnDsli and Psg'gnoslss 

..... j„ , ■ lin Digital PicXurBS 



1, ©ISSO and ©1913. SIAB WABS" REBEl ASSAUIT is a 



/^M^ mm SECA. 131S A.den Bead, Hayvard, CA 9454S.AII righlt teseived. Sega :D unit made in Japin. Sellw.re made in llle'u 



get through to the tech sup- 
port department. The second 
problem is that many manufac- 
turers have gone out of busi- 
ness in the past five years, so 
you may not find anyone to 
tall< to anyway. 

Fortunately, there is a better 
way. The vital statistics for 
most disks are sitting right on 
the disks themselves. 

Every hard disk that's ever 
been used in a PC has been 
partitioned, a process usually 
performed by the Fdisk pro- 
gram. Partitioning was original- 
ly created to allow multiple op- 
erating systems to coexist on 
a single hard disk, but you (or 
the person who sets up your 
computer) must partition the 
disk even if that means allocat- 
ing the whole disk to just one 
partition. The information that 
describes how a disk is parti- 
tioned is stored in an area 
called the partition table, 
which is part of the master 
boot record, or MBR, which is 
on every PC disk. 

Partition information de- 
scribes each partition by includ- 
ing both its starting address — 
which cylinder, head, and sec- 
tor it starts on — and also its end- 
ing address — which cylinder, 
head, and sector it ends on. As- 
suming that whoever set up the 
disk used all of it, the coordi- 
nates of the last cylinder, 
head, and sector on the parti- 
tion should also be the coor- 
dinates of the last cylinder, 
head, and sector on the disk. 

The MBR is always located 
at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 . 
Cylinder 0/0/1 is readable 
from drive type 1 (a 10MB 
drive description), and drive 
type 1 will make any hard 
disk's MBR readable. It won't 
make it bootable, but it'll 
make it readable. So you can 
boot from a floppy and use a 
disk utility to read 0/0/1. 

Putting this all together, you 
can find out the vital statistics 
on any mystery disk by follow- 
ing these steps. 



Step 1 : Create a bootable 
floppy disk, and put the Nor- 
ton program DISKEDITEXE 
on it. It's part of the Norton Util- 
ities (and has been since ver- 
sion 2,0). My explicit instruc- 
tions will be for version 7.0. 

Step 2: Boot from the flop- 
py containing Diskedit. 

Step 3: Run your PC's Setup 
program. Under hard disk 
drive type number, you'll see 
that it probably says drive type 
or no hard disk. Change it to 
drive type number 1. 

Step 4: Run Diskedit by typ- 
ing diskedit c: at the com- 
mand line. If you see a mes- 
sage box warning you that 
Diskedit is in read-only mode 
and that no changes that you 
make to the disk with Diskedit 
will be actually written, that's 
fine because you don't want to 
accidentally make things 
worse by overwriting informa- 
tion on your hard disk. Just 
press Enter to clear the mes- 
sage box. 

Step 5: Diskedit may com- 
plain about your hard disk not 
making sense; that's to be ex- 
pected, so just tell Diskedit to 
ignore any problems. Don't let 
Diskedit make any changes to 
your system. 

Step 6: You'll see a menu 
across the top of the screen 
with these options: Object, Ed- 
it, Link, View, Info, Toots, and 
Help. You pull down a menu 
by pressing the Alt key and 
the first letter of the menu op- 
tion, so press Alt-0 to pull 
down the Object menu. The 
Object menu starts off with the 
options Drive and Directory. 
Look for an option that says Par- 
tition Table Alt-i-A. If this option 
is grayed out, you'll have to 
choose the Drive menu selec- 
tion. (If Partition Table Alt-i-A 
isn't grayed out, just skip to 
the next step.) 

You'll see a dialog box ask- 
ing which drive to edit and 
whether the drive is a logical 
or physical disk. Select the ra- 
dio button for Physical disks. 



and select Hard Disk 1. 

Step 7: Now tell Diskedit to 
get the MBR and show you the 
partition table inside it. Just 
press Alt-A to tell Diskedit to 
load the MBR into memory, 
and then press F6 to tell 
Diskedit to show you the parti- 
tion table within the MBR. You'll 
probably see one or two parti- 
tions; look at the partition 
whose ending location contains 
the larger numbers. For exam- 
ple, the disk that i'm looking at 
reports an ending location of 
side 15, cylinder 993, sector 
63 (what Setup calls heads, 
Diskedit calls sides). Write 
down the side, cylinder, and 
sector numbers. 

Step 8; Exit Diskedit (press 
Esc and then confirm that you 
want to exit the program). 

Step 9: Assuming that who- 
ever originally partitioned this 
disk used up all the cylinders, 
that would mean that the last 
sector on my particular disk 
was the sector at cylinder 993, 
head 15, sector 63. That im- 
plies that there were 994 cyl- 
inders on this disk, because 
the first cylinder's number is 0, 
not 1. It also implies that the 
number of heads is 16, be- 
cause the first head's number 
is also 0. For some reason, sec- 
tors are numbered starting 
with 1, not (don't ask me 
why: 1 have no idea), so if the 
last sector is 63, the number 
of sectors is also 63. So add 
1 to the cylinders and sides to 
get total numbers of cylinders 
and heads, and don't do any- 
thing to the sectors to get total 
numbers of sectors. 

Armed with this knowledge, 
you can then match these val- 
ues to your system's drive ta- 
ble to find out which drive 
type the disk is. On more mod- 
ern systems, you wouldn't find 
a drive type; instead, you'd 
pick drive type 47, the user- 
definable type, and directly 
punch in 994 for the cylinders, 
16 for the heads, and 63 for 
the sectors. O 



The information that 
describes iiow 
a disk is partitioned 
is stored in 
an area called the 
partition table, 
which is part of the 
master boot reconi. 



NOVEMBER 1993 COtvlPUTE 65 



SUMO HEAD BUTTS, 

SONIC BOOMS, 

WHIRIWIND KICKS, 

DRAGON PUNCHES, 

BUTT CRUSHES, 

FIREBALLS, 

SPINNING PILEDRIVERS 




Street Fighter IP" is a registered trademark of Cdpcom Co., Ijd. 



WILL YOUR PC SURVIVE? WILL YOU? 




FOR THE PC 



CAPCOM 



Distributed by Hi Tech Expressions 

Available at your local softwore retailer 

or call 1-800-447-6543 to order by 

MCAISA/AMEX 

Circle Reader Service Njmber 140 




Infinite Expansion 

Open up nearly any PC. Chances are, the innards would bring a devilish smile to Dr. 
Victor Frankenstein's lips. Sound card here, fax/data modem there, SCSI controller 
over there. Dig through the jumble of ribbon cables, and what do you see? A cutting- 
edge, 24-bit graphics card chugging away on a slow, 8-MHz, 16-bit bus. 

Of all of humankind's great creations, the PC must rank among the most haphaz- 
ard. Take a poll of your friends. I'd bet that no two of them have even remotely the 
same setup. With the exception of the disks that we insert in the front and the power 
cord that we plug into the wall, our computers are as individual as we are. They're 
machines, yet they're an amalgam of parts and pieces reminiscent of the late-night 
works of Dr. Frankenstein. Like the good doctor, we must experiment and tweak to 

Article By Paul C. Schuytema 





H^-l-H^- 




3EtiKti,-^'^^*1i1tlMiliB>Jt'*^'iiiiiBiitl<^ I — ''1'i 



The hottest news in computers 
/ is arriving l>y bus. 



get our beasts to run and behave; but still, no matter how we try, they remain elusive, 
unpredictable, and frightening. Lil<e the monster, who would flip out when a torch was 
waved in his face, our computers have equally potent, equally mysterious phobias. 
Close one application without saving, or launch a program in compressed form when 
it doesn't like being compressed, and your beast will turn against you. 

How do the parts work together? How does your video card get information from 
your hard disk? How does your fax/data modem know what to send? 

The answer is connectability. Parts connected to more parts, sharing information 
across standardized pathways called buses. Bus is a shortened version of omnibus 
connector, a term utilized in the Precambrian Era of personal computing, when con- 



lllustration By Kee Hwa Jeun 



nectability first became an issue and 
standardization had only begun to be 
a concern. 

S-100 

The first bus standard was known as 
the S-100, short for Standard 100 (so 
designated because it was the de 
facto standard and v/as based on a 
clip that had 100 pins), Bacl< in 1975, 
when Popular Electronics and MITS 
(originally a model-rocketry company) 
decided that it would be a good idea to 
produce a kit for building a computer, 
they came up with the Altair 8800, a 
rather ignoble beast which sold 
beyond anyone's wildest expectations. 
Yet this primordial PC was nothing 
more than a glorified box, an energy 
leach which communicated through 
front-panel switches and lights. 

To work, it needed connections. 
The designers thought that making 
these connections modular — in a 
bus — would be more efficient than 
having the connectors on the comput- 
er board itself. A bus would aiso allow 
third-party manufacturers to produce 
enhancements for the Altair that the 
user could simply plug in. So the S- 
100 bus was born. 

Not much planning went into the S- 
100. In fact, it featured 100 pins sim- 
ply because MITS happened to get a 
good deal on a surplus of IGO-pin 
connector clips. Now, planning and 
forethought dominate the world of PC 
buses. Committees and manufactur- 
ing groups are constantly working on 
creating new bus standards. Yet, 
what, really, is a bus? In the simplest 
terms, a bus is a physical channel 
(wires, pins, or circuit board paths) 
between the CPU (Central Processing 
Unit) and the other components of a 
computer, such as a disk drive con- 
troller or video board, 

The ISA Bus 

While the S-iOO remained the de facto 
standard for a number of years, and 
the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers) attempted to 
improve and refine it in 1983, the S-100 
had the unfortunate luck to exist in the 
caim before the revoiution. Not until 
IBM released the PC did the personal 
computer industry take off. The old PC 
(and the XT that followed) featured 62- 
llne expansion slots which provided an 
8-bit. 4-MHz data path to the CPU. This 
bus is commonly known as the 8-bit 
ISA (Industry Standard Architecture; 
pronounced "eye-sah") bus. It wasn't 
long before IBM upped the ante and 
introduced the 286-powered AT. 

The 286 was a 16-bit CPU, and so 
the engineers at IBM developed a 16- 
bit expansion bus. Yet they didn't 

70 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



want to leave the PC users, or that 
established base of expansion 
boards, in the dust. So the new bus 
was an extension rather than a 
reworking of the old bus. An addition- 
al connector was added in line with 
the old connectors, so a user could 
plug in an XT board, or a newer AT 
board. The 16-bit ISA bus was born. 

This bus was the data highway 
between the CPU and the peripheral 
components, and it provided a 16-bit- 
wide path that operated at 8 MHz. In 
the early days of the AT and clones, a 
speed of 8 MHz wasn't such a bad 
deal, since it was the speed of most 
processors. It's difficult to remember 
in this day and age that the 286 CPU 
of the original AT — for Advanced 
Technology — was an 8-MH2 chip. 
Later, as CPUs gained speed, some 
manufacturers attempted to match the 
bus speed with the CPU, with unpre- 
dictable, even dangerous, results. 
Eventually, 8 MHz became the stan- 
dard speed for the ISA bus. This 
speed is not much of a disadvantage 
for such things as modem boards, 
which operate at slow speeds any- 
way. Instead, the limitation is felt when 
a memory, video, or SCSI board, 
which has the potential to keep up 
with the processor, must be reined 
down to 8 MHz. 

Darwinian Revolution 

Currently, the ISA bus is the industry 
standard, based on sheer numbers 



alone. Yet this bus's limitations proved 
to be a turning point in the evolution of 
the PC. 

Most 486 PCs still communicate 
with their components through an ISA 
bus. As a result, most boards wili work 
on most computers, offering a myriad 
of choices for the user. Yet this stan- 
dard forces a 50-MHz, or even 66- 
MHz, 486 to communicate with its 
expansion cards at 8 MHz, If Dr. 
Frankenstein were to look over our 
creation, he'd be shocked to see the 
equivalent of his giant's cardiopul- 
monary system fitted with the smallest 
of capillaries and nothing else. 

The ISA bus is far from being ready 
for the charnel house, however. 
Recently, Microsoft and Intel an- 
nounced a p!ug-and-play modification 
for the ISA bus specification. While 
not changing the speed of the bus, 
this enhancement will mean easier 
installation of components. When it 
comes time to install a new board, you 
won't have to fiddle with DIP switches, 
trying to find that combination of 
addresses that makes the card work 
in concert with other peripheral 
devices. Instead, you'll plug in a 
board and let software set it up. This 
type of autosensing is a key element 
of the more advanced expansion 
buses and has been employed for 
several years in the NuBus on Apple's 
Macintosh computers. These new 
plug-and-play boards should start 
popping up near the end of 1993. 



Glossary 



bus. Most basically, a physical 
pathway between the various hard- 
ware devices that mat^e up a com- 
puter. A computer can have several 
buses, such as the CPU's data bus, 
a memory bus, a local bus, and an 
expansion bus. 

bus master. An expansion 
device which temporarily takes 
charge of the bus, controlling data 
transfers in and out of memory with- 
out help from the CPU, 

data throughput. The actual 
amount of real information that is 
either transmitted through a bus or 
processed by a device. Not all infor- 
mation that leaves a bus necessarily 
counts as real information; some 
information might be redundant or be 
part of some error-checking system. 

intermediate bus. A bus con- 
nected to the CPU's data bus 
through a buffering controller which is 
responsible for the speed and timing 



of the data operations. The PCI bus is 
an example of an intermediate bus, 

local bus. A hard-wired expan- 
sion bus between a connector and 
the CPU data lines. A local bus 
allows a device, such as a video 
controller, to operate at the same 
speed as the CPU. 

megahertz (MHz). A unit of 
frequency representing one miiiion 
cycles per second, often used to 
describe a computer's clock rate or 
its raw, internal speed, 

plug-and-play card. An ex- 
pansion card that configures itself, 
either with an installation program or 
dunng boot-up. 

SCSI. Small Computer System 
Interface. SCSI could be considered 
another bus standard, but one that 
requires a controller to fit into a com- 
puter's standard bus socket, A SCSI 
interface is often used to control 
hard drives or CD-ROM drives. 




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The MCA Bus 

IBM took notice of ISA's shortcomings. 
When the first of the 32-blt Intel CPUs— 
the 386— appeared, IBM incorporated a 
new 32-bit bus architecture into its PS/2 
line of computers: the MCA (Micro 
Channel Architecture) bus. 

The MCA bus is software-compati- 
ble with the ISA bus. but that's where 
the similarities end. !BM attempted to 
make a bus that would grow with the 
advances in hardware, featuring a 
tight bundle of specifications and the 
ability to perform bus mastering (an 
operation in which a component actu- 
ally supersedes the CPU and has free 
rein of the bus for a time, greatly 
speeding up operations). The MCA 
bus also allows components to enjoy 
direct memory access instead of 
putting in requests for memory access 
via the CPU. 

Yet for all its technological ad- 
vancement, the MCA bus is already 
on its way out, atrophying in the high- 
speed world of computer advance- 
ments. The MCA bus is not physically 
compatible with any other bus; a 
board must be specifically designed 
for use with the bus. The I\/1CA design 
specs are the property of IBM, which 
is not providing board manufacturers 
with easy access to the information. 
Basically, any third-party vendors who 
wish to manufacture MCA boards 
must re-create the bus themselves, 
spending precious R&D dollars, and 
then pay IBM a percentage of the 
gross sales of the board for the privi- 
lege of using the bus. As anyone who 
watches the PC market can tell you, 
that procedure is unlikely to gain the 
MCA bus any champions. 

EISA Bus 

The MCA bus was developed by IBM 
to speed up expansion bus operation 
and to bind developers to Big Blue 
(as IBM is known in the industry), But 
it caused resentment among other 
computer makers who objected to its 
nonstandard design and were rankled 
by the notion of paying IBM a premi- 
um. As a reaction to the MCA bus, a 
group of makers of PC clones and 
compatibles got together and devel- 
oped a competing standard, one 
which was both hardware- and soft- 
ware-compatible with the ISA bus. 
They dubbed the new standard the 
EISA (Extended Industry Standard 
Architecture) bus. 

Physically, an EISA (pronounced 
"ee-sah') expansion slot looks the 
same as an ISA slot, except that it's 
deeper. An ISA card will fit into the 
slot, connecting with one set of pins, 
while an EISA card will fit further into 
the slot, connecting with the EISA 

72 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



When Is a Bus 
Not a Bus? 

Two other interesting bus alterna- 
tives deserve mention. One is the 
SCSI (Small Computer System 
interface) which allows up to seven 
peripherals to be daisy-chained 
(linked device-to-device) — in theo- 
ry, though most SCSI devices for 
PCs have a somewhat proprietary 
standard that prevents daisy-chain- 
ing, requihng that you use a dedi- 
cated ISA card for each SCSI 
device. Emerging solutions like 
CorelSCSI and SCSiWorks make it 
possible to daisychain even these 
recalcitrant SCSI devices, however. 

The parallel interface is emerging 
as a sort of bus. The mother of this 
invention was the necessity to link 
peripherals to pre-PCMCIA laptops. 
Most of these computers had parallel 
interfaces, most of which were wired 
in such a way as to provide enough 
control to drive a sound card or a 
CD-ROM drive {for example). 

Although SCSI is a brilliant idea 
for linking peripherals to a very 
small computer {one without room 
for an internal bus), its implementa- 
tion in the PC has made it a minor 
pawn in the bus game. And al- 
though the parallel interface was the 
focus of a lot of inventive design for 
a year or so, it lost its spotlight when 
the PCMCIA standard emerged and 
was instantly embraced. 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



pins. The bus will allow quite a num- 
ber of expansion cards to run concur- 
rently on a system, like the ISA bus. 
The EISA bus is a 32-bit bus, meaning 
that it can transfer information in 32-bit 
chunks, matching the input/output 
(I/O) of the 386DX and 486 proces- 
sors. The EISA standard, like MCA, 
also supports bus mastering. 

EISA does have two inherent prob- 
lems, however. To insure ISA compati- 
bility, the bus must operate at 8 MHz. 
Also, since an EISA board fits into 
deeper slots, an EISA system cannot 
easily see differences between ISA 
and EISA boards on the same sys- 
tem — setting the user up for some 
potential addressing conflicts, 

Lotal Bus 

A local bus is a data path which is 
connected directly to the CPU's own 
data bus and operates at the speed of 
the CPU. When computer evolution 
was in its earliest stages, most buses 
were of the local variety. The data 
channels were purely proprietary in 



nature, designed for a particular ver- 
sion of a particular machine. As com- 
puters became more commonplace, 
and many manufacturers were creat- 
ing all types of devices for them, this 
nonstandardized method fell by the 
wayside as manufacturers adopted 
buses such as the S-100 bus, 

Recently, as the boom in graphical 
user interface (GUI) computing hit the 
industry, a performance bottleneck 
became increasingly apparent. The 
ISA bus's 8-MHz speed was simply 
too slow to handle the video demands 
of Windows, with its monstrously 
large, constantly changing bitmaps. 
The local bus seemed once again to 
be an answer. 

Motherboard manufacturers devel- 
oped proprietary buses designed to fit 
their own graphics accelerators, and 
local-bus video was born. Take a look 
at the mail-order computer ads from 
the summer of 1992. You'll find that 
ads for local-bus video systems 
abounded. (If you look very carefully, 
you'll find that perhaps one in ten of 
these systems — the most expensive 
ones— were touted as VESA local-bus 
systems. But more about this later.) 

Basically, these local-bus systems 
were task-specific buses connected 
directly to the CPU's data bus before any 
of the other hard-wired connections or the 
ISA bus, thus improving performance. 

While one problem was solved, 
however, anotfier more serious prob- 
lem surfaced. This bus had no true, 
binding standard. Local-bus cards 
bought from one company would not 
work on another company's computer. 
And in the fly-by-night world of PC 
clones, if a company went out of busi- 
ness, the consumer was out of luck in 
finding updated drivers to make the 
most of the high-speed video. I pur- 
chased a computer duhng that sum- 
mer; it wasn't advertised as a local-bus 
system, but the motherboard does fea- 
ture two local-bus slots. Unfortunately, 
the OEM company is now out of busi- 
ness, and the motherboard was manu- 
factured in a faraway country, so the 
local bus is now only a vestigial organ 
on my machine, an appendix that does 
neither harm nor good. 

VL-Bus 

Fortunately, the local-bus concept met 
with enough support to necessitate 
the development of a standard bus 
configuration. Enter VESA (Video 
Electronics Standards Association), 
an organization which represents the 
interests of more than 60 computer 
and component manufacturers, and 
which is developing an industrywide 
implementation of the local bus. 

Physically, the 112-pin connectors 



for the VL-Bus are placed in line with 
the EISA/ISA slots. The VL-Bus is a 32- 
bit bus which will run at the speed of 
the processor. Currently, the VL-Bus is 
optimized for 486 systems up to 66 
MHz, but the standard will soon be 
expanded to support Pentium proces- 
sors. By operating at the speed of the 
CPU, the VL-Bus can transfer informa- 
tion at a rate of over lOOfvlB per sec- 
ond, The bus, like MCA, EISA, and PCI 
(see below), supports bus mastering. 

The VL-Bus is designed primarily to 
provide a rabbit-quick connection for 
Video cards, but it can also be used for 
other high-speed applications such as 
SCSI controllers or uttrafast ISDN 
devices. Only three components may 
use the VL-Bus on one computer — 
which is just as well, since running three 
devices will slow the system down con- 
siderably. This probably won't be much 
of a problem for single-station comput- 
ers for several years, but it might be 
more limiting for a file server. 

PCI Bus 

The latest evolution of the PC bus is 
Intel's PCI (Peripheral Component 
Interconnect) bus. Like the '\/L-Bus, 
the PCI is a standard created by a 
group representing the computer 
industry, this time the PCI Special 
Interest Group, headed up by Intel. 

PCI is an attempt to move bus 
technology forward in one large step. 
Instead of being a local bus, connect- 
ed directly to the CPU's data bus (and 
being tied to the processor's genera- 
tion), it's an intermediate bus, which is 
controlled by a dedicated buffering 
chip. The bus is still a full-featured 32- 
bit data path which can operate at 33 
MHz and claims (on paper, as of this 
writing) a data throughput speed in 
excess of 130MB per second. 

The bus is designed to connect a 
wide array of components and has 
been forward-engineered to take 
advantage of 64-bit processors (read 
Pentium), cranking the speed up to 
264MB per second. The bus is also 
engineered to work at the 3-3-volt 
power level of today's power-savvy 
processors and notebooks. The PCI 
version of bus mastering allows a 
device to utilize the bus while the 
processor is still processing other data. 

The PCI bus is designed for plug- 
and-play installation, meaning that no 
PCI board, whether video, HDTV, or 
SCSI, will have on-board jumpers to 
be set and reset. Everything is config- 
ured through software. The PCI bus 
will also allow shared slots, meaning 
that the PCI connector is placed in 
line with the ISA/EISA connectors, but 
it will not disable them. It is possible, 
then (for example), for a single board 



PCMCIA 



In the world of buses, there's anoth- 
er standard which is rapidly growing 
in prominence but which isn't neces- 
sarily a bus, in the true sense of the 
word. I'm talking about the PC Card 
standard, sometimes called the 
PCMCIA, after the standards organi- 
zation (the Personal Computer 
Memory Card International Associ- 
ation) that developed it. 

The PC Card is designed primarily 
as an expansion system for subnote- 
book computers, but the flexibility of 
the bus means that PC Card devices 
will start popping up everywhere, 
from camcorders to desktop PCs. 

The PCMCIA 2.0 Standard, for- 
malized in September 1990, is more 
than just a physical bus technology; 
it's a standard that describes file for- 
mats, data structures, software links, 
and standards for accessing the 
card's hardware features, regard- 
less of the type of system in which 
the card resides. The specification 
even allows for program code to 
execute directly from the card, inde- 
pendent of any system memory. 



As a bus, the PCMCIA standard is 
a relatively primitive 16~bit pathway, 
but the PC Card can access up to 64 
megabytes of memory, and a system 
could, in theory, have over 4000 cards 
connected to it (think of the potential 
for building surveillance systems!). 

The PC Card is another plug-and- 
play card that will configure itself, but 
it's also more robustly designed than 
any of the standards mentioned in 
the article, meaning that unexpected 
power-downs, or even putting the 
card in its slot upside down, won't 
hurt either the card or the system. 

The area of a PC Card is roughly 
the same as that of a credit card, 
but the card comes in three thick- 
nesses. The thinnest, 3,3 mm, is for 
memory cards and nonvolatile stor- 
age systems (which keep their con- 
tents even when the computer's 
power is turned off). The 5-mm thick- 
ness is for such devices as 
modems, and the thickest, at 10.5 
mm, can house miniaturized hard 
drives and other components that 
require more room. 



to contain a PCI video controller and 
an ISA sound device. 

The PCI bus is designed to handle 
both motherboard-mounted devices 
(such as a single-chip VGA system) 
and expansion cards; a typical PCI 
bus could handle three cards and four 
motherboard-mounted devices before 
becoming overloaded. 

Not only has PCI has made head- 
way into the future of the PC, but Apple 
has committed to the PCI bus and fias 
joined the Special Interest Group. 
Soon, Apple's Macintoshes will be fea- 
turing both NuBus and PCI capabili- 
ties. It's just another sign of the evolu- 
tion toward a completely modular, 
standardized PC architecture. 

Transit Authority 

On the one hand, computer expan- 
sion buses are abstract concepts; on 
the other, they are horrendously tech- 
nical conglomerations of voltage 
specifications and data paths. For an 
educated PC user, a knowledge of the 
basic differences and design con- 
cepts of the various buses can make 
that next board or computer purchase 
less of a mystery tour. 

So, which bus is best? That's as 
loaded a question as you're likely to 
find. One thing is certain: You should 
stay away from proprietary local-bus 
systems. Their life expectancy is just 
too unpredictable. Is ISA dead? Not 



by a long shot — and the new plug- 
and-play standard should help it 
remain the de facto standard for sev- 
eral years to come. Even though the 
8-MHz speed may seem ponderously 
slow when compared to VL-Bus or 
PCI performance, the ISA bus is a 
data highway that's more than wide 
enough for 90 percent of your com- 
puting needs. If you do a lot of graph- 
ics work, or if you're like me and live in 
Windows, either the VL-Bus or PCI 
bus would be a smart bet on your next 
system. The EISA bus probably fits 
into the smallest useful niche, as the 
bus of choice for LAN file servers. The 
8-MHz speed is more than adequate, 
and the 32-bit-wide pathway will pre- 
vent bottlenecks. 

As for the future of PCs, the one- 
system/one-bus approach will proba- 
bly no longer hold. According to Mike 
Bailey, chairman of the PCI Special 
Interest Group steering committee, 
computers four to five years down the 
road will probably feature a mixture of 
three buses; an ISA or EISA bus for 
standard devices, a local or interme- 
diate high-performance bus (either 
PCI or VL-Bus) for such things as dis- 
play and SCSI controllers, and a 
PCMCIA bus for multisystem connec- 
tions. For the moment, it might be best 
to wait and watch, and see which bus 
garners the most support in terms of 
products being produced. □ 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 73 




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WHAT MAKES A 

FAST FORWARD 

MULTIMEDIA PC? 



BY DAVID ENGLISH 



Just when you thought it was safe to buy an MPC 
(Multimedia PC), they introduce MPC Level 2. What's 
going on here? What do you really need to put together 
a decent multimedia PC? 

First, a bit of multimedia history. When Microsoft, 
Tandy, AT & T, NEC, Creative Labs, Media Vision, and a 
bunch of other companies announced the multimedia 
PC in November 1990, they set the standard low so that 
they couid sell a lot of MPCs at a reasonable price. The 
Initial MPC standard called for a lO-MHz 286 or faster 
processor. At the time, there was a lot of talk about a 
286 not being up to the task, but Microsoft's official line 
was that if a 286 could run Windows, it should 
also be able to run Multimedia Windows 
(Microsoft tried to discourage the name 
Multimedia Windows for the version 
of Windows that shipped with the 
new MPCs. Fearing that people 
would be confused by differ 
ent versions of Windows — 
clearly no longer a con 
cern — the company tried 
to push the more political- 
ly correct Microsoft 
Windows graphical envi- 
ronment 3.0 + Multi- 
media extensions 1.0.) 
By September 1991, 
MPCs and MPC upgrade 
kits were shipping, and 
the MPC standard was off 
to a sloW'but-steady start. 

The year 1992 brought 
three important changes. 
First, the Multimedia PC 
Marketing Council, the body 
that was given authority over the 
MPC standard, quietly increased the 
minimum required processor to a 16 
MHz 386SX. Second, Windows 3.1 brought 
the multimedia extensions (most importantly, the 
sound-card and CD-ROM drivers) into mainstream 
Windows. And finally, we saw a gradual growth in the 
number of innovative CD-ROM titles, with such stand- 
outs as Just Grandma and Me, Compton's Interactive 
Encyclopedia, and Microsoft Cinemania. 

In 1993, the titles have expanded to include such 
luminaries as The 7th Guest, The Animals!, and 
Microsoft Encarta. The year has also brought us the 
MPC Level 2 specification, which promises to raise our 
multimedia applications to a whole new level. 

Briefly, the MPC Level 1 standard calls for at least a 
16-MHz 386SX with 2MB of RAM, VGA display (640 x 




480 with 16 colors), a 30MB hard drive, a sound card 
capable of 8-bit digital sound, and a CD-ROM drive that 
can move data at a sustained rate of 150K per second 
with a maximum average seek time of 1000 millisec- 
onds. The two weakest links of the Level 1 chain are the 
processor (these days, you need at least a fast 386DX) 
and VGA display (many MPC titles either don't run in 16 
colors or look pretty awful when they do; you really need 
640 X 480 with 256 colors). 

The new MPC Level 2 specs are designed to better 
accommodate the MPC titles that include photorealistic 
graphics and full-motion video clips (usually Video for 
Windows or QuickTime for Windows). The standard 
calls for at least a 25-MHz 486SX with 4MB of 
RAM, a Super VGA display (640 x 480 
with 65,536 colors), a 160MB hard 
drive, a sound card capable of 16- 
bit digital sound (CD quality), and 
a CD-ROM drive that can move 
data at a sustained rate of 
300K per second, has a 
maximum average seek 
time of 400 milliseconds, 
and is CD-ROM XA ready 
and multisession capable 
(for use with Kodak's 
Photo CDs). 

Level 1 machines will 
still be available as low- 
end starter MPCs, but you 
should consider buying a 
Level 2 machine if you're 
looking to buy a multimedia 
PC. Given today's low prices, 
you should be able to find 
Level 2 MPCs for as little as 
$2,500. Creative Labs (408-428- 
6600) and Media Vision (800-348- 
7116) have already announced Level 2 
upgrade kits that include a 16-bit sound card 
and double-speed CD-ROM drive. Creative Labs' 
Sound Blaster DigitalEdge CD package costs $999, 
while Media Vision's Fusion Double CD-16 and Pro 16 
Multimedia System cost $799 and $1,199, respectively. 
All three packages include a bundle of CD- 
ROM-based multimedia applications. Currently, Level 1 
upgrade packages are available for as little as $400. 

If your nnultimedia PC meets the Level 2 standard 
in some respects but falls back to Level 1 in other 
respects, don't worry that you won't be able to run 
MPC software. Most titles won't be written exclusive- 
ly for Level 2, but will simply support the higher- 
standard components where available, □ 




MULTIMEDIA PC 



BY DAVID ENGLISH 



You wouldn't watch TV with 
the sound turned off, yet 
most of us have the sound 
turned off in Windows. 
Granted, Windows isn't yet 
an all-tall<ing, all-dancing, 
all-singing kind of operating 
system, but there's a lot you 
can do with Windows and a 
half-decent sound card. 
Over the next few pages, 
we'll explore what kind of 
hardware you'll need in 
order to add sound to 
Windows, which kinds of 
audio Windows can work 
with, and which software lets 
you create and manipulate 
this audio. 

All in the Cards 

Before we talk about the 
wonderful things you can do 
with Windows and sound, 
we need to discuss what 
kind of hardware you'll 
need. The quick answer is a 
sound card and a pair of 
speakers, The sound card 
can be either an 8-bit or a 
16-bit card {or one of the in- 
between 12-bit cards), 
though 16-bit cards are 
inexpensive enough that I 
wouldn't recommend any- 
thing else these days. 

When you hear people 
talk about 8-bit and 16-bit 
sound cards, they're not talk- 
ing about cards that require 
an 8-bit or 16-bit bus. 
They're talking about the 
sampling rate of the card. A 
16-bit card can theoretically 
sound as good as an audio- 
CD player (theoretically, 
because electrical interfer- 
ence from the motherboard 



and adjacent cards can 
degrade the sound). With its 
lower sampling rate, an 8-bit 
card will have more inherent 
noise and won't be capable 
of reproducing the high fre- 
quencies that a 16-bit card 
can handle. In other words, 
a 16-bit card can sound as 
good as the CD player in 
your home stereo system, 
while an 8-bit card can 



Yamaha's 0PL2 or 0PL3) 
for Ad Lib compatibility. This 
allows a sound card to play 
back the computer-sound- 
ing music and sound effects 
that DOS games have been 
using since the middle 
1980s. 

Microsoft's specifications 
for Windows audio include 
the 8-bit DAC and ADC of 
the Sound Blaster and the 



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sound only as good as an 
inexpensive Ff^ radio. 

The sampling portion of a 
sound card uses a DAC 
(Digital-to-Analog Converter) 
and an ADC (Analog-to- 
Digital Converter), This pro- 
vides the Sound Blaster 
compatibility. Most cards 
include Sound Blaster com- 
patibility so you can play the 
wide variety of DOS games 
that use it for realistic music, 
voice, and sound effects, 
fvlost cards also include an 
FM-synthesis chip (usually 



FM synthesis of the Ad Lib 
card as a minimum stan- 
dard. Most sound cards 
designed specifically for 
Windows also support the 
Sound Blaster and Ad Lib 
standards for DOS games, 
though some don't, A few 
cards, such as Turtle 
Beach's MultiSound and 
Microsoft's Windows Sound 
System, will soon offer DOS 
game compatibltity through 
a small TSR program that 
you'll load when you boot 
your system. 



Five-Stor General 

Many sound cards signifi- 
cantly improve on the FM 
synthesis portion of the card 
by offering General MIDI, 
either built in or as an 
optional chip set. General 
MIDI uses the actual 
sounds, usually stored in 
ROM, to re-create musical 
instruments. When an FM 
chip creates a trumpet, it 
approximates the sound 
mathematically. When a 
General MIDI device creates 
a trumpet, it calls up the 
actual wave information 
based on the recording of a 
real trumpet. Most of today's 
professional synthesizers 
use this same technology to 
create musical instruments 
that are virtually indistin- 
guishable from the originals. 

General MIDI brings this 
highly realistic sound to 
inexpensive consumer prod- 
ucts, such as computer 
sound cards. By 1994, the 
majority of sound cards 
should have General MIDI 
built in. Yamaha has even 
announced a new version of 
the FM chip, called the 
0PL4, that includes General 
MIDI. 

For a preview of just how 
good General MIDI can 
sound in a computer pro- 
gram, check out the best- 
selling CD-ROM game. The 
7th Guest. When installed 
with a General MIDI device, 
its music sounds like a fully 
orchestrated movie score. 

If your present sound 
card doesn't have General 
MIDI or offer it as an add-on, 



don't worry, Most sound 
cards offer a MIDI interface 
that can hiook up to an 
external General MIDI 
device, such as Roland's 
Sound Canvas ($399-$895), 
Yamaha's TG100 ($449). 
and Yamaha's Hello Music! 
($449). 

Weakest Link 

So you've bought a great- 
sounding 16-bit sound card 
and maybe even have 
General MIDI, Now what? If 
you're like most of us, you'll 
scrimp on the speakers, 
possibly hooking up an old 
pair lying around the house. 
You can do that, of course, 
but you should consider 
investing in a pair of pow- 
ered speakers that are 
magnetically shielded. 
You'll want powered speak- 
ers because the two- to 
four-watt amplifier on most 
sound cards just doesn't 
give you much volume. In 
fact, you can barely hear 
your sound card with many 
small speakers. Some 
cards also provide a sepa- 
rate output that completely 
bypasses the often-inferior 
built-in amplifier. You'll want 
magnetically shielded 
speakers because the mag- 
nets in your speakers can 
permanently scramble the 
data on disks you place on 
or even near them, as well 
as temporarily distort the 
image on your monitor if 
you place your speakers 
beside it. 

How much should you 
pay for a pair of powered 



speakers that are magneti- 
cally shielded? They start at 
about S40 for the least 
expensive pairs from com- 
panies such as Koss and 
Labtech. Yamaha (714-522- 
9011) makes an excellent 
pair for $149, called the 
YST-M10. For top-of-the-line 
sound, check out the Altec 
Lansing Multimedia ACS- 
300 (Altec Lansing Con- 



sound Windows can pro- 
duce. Windows 3.1 sup- 
ports two major categories 
of sound: waveform audio 
and MIDI audio. Waveform 
audio is recorded sound 
that's usually stored in files 
with the WAV extension. 
Once you associate these 
files with a program that 
can play WAV files, such as 
Windows' Media Player 




sumer Products, 800-258- 
3280, $400 a pair) and the 
Power Partner 570 (Acous- 
tic Research, 800-969-2748, 
$475 a pair). The Yamaha, 
Altec, and Acoustic 
Research speakers sound 
so good that you may also 
want to use them with your 
CD player or Walkman. 

The Sound and the 
Fury 

Now that you have an idea 
of the hardware you'll need, 
let's look at the kinds of 



(MPLAYER.EXE) or Sound 
Recorder (SOUNDREC- 
.EXE), you can simply load 
up Windows' File Manager, 
double-click on a WAV file, 
and hear the sound. Many 
Windows games and multi- 
media CD-ROMs use WAV 
files, so you can give them 
a listen, copy the ones you 
like, and aiter the sounds 
using one of the sound-edit- 
ing programs that we'll look 
at later in this article. 

While MIDI files can play 
music, much like WAV files. 



they have a radically differ- 
ent structure — which gives 
them both advantages and 
disadvantages. Instead of 
storing the actual sound, 
MIDI files contain the con- 
trol commands for a MIDI- 
controlled musical instru- 
ment. These control com- 
mands consist mainly of 
note-on, note-off, pitch- 
change, instrument- 
change, and volume infor- 
mation. Because a MIDI file 
stores only the bare essen- 
tials of a musical perfor- 
mance, the music in a MIDI 
file can take as little as 
1/100 the space on your 
hard drive that music of the 
same quality would take in 
a WAV file. On the other 
hand, because a MIDI file 
contains only control com- 
mands, it's highly depen- 
dent on the quality and 
availability of a MIDI device. 
WAV files sound essentially 
the same with any sound 
card, while MIDI files can 
vary dramatically according 
to the quality of the MIDI- 
based musical instrument. 
In addition, WAV files can 
store any kind of sound, 
whether it's instrumental 
music, narration, or sound 
effects (essentially whatev- 
er you can record with a 
microphone). MIDI files can 
reproduce only the kinds of 
sounds that the accompa- 
nying MIDI device is capa- 
ble of reproducing (usually 
1 28 or more specific instru- 
ment sounds). 

As if that weren't confus- 
ing enough, Windows 



VSTO 





MUi:ri]\n:i)iA PC 



Home Recording Studio 

So you bought a 16-bit 
sound card, high-quality 
microphone, and powerful 
sound-editing program, 
such as Sound Forge 2.0 
or Wave for Windows 2.0. 
You've put together a first- 
class digital home record- 
ing studio, right? 

Assuming your sound 
card is properly shielded 
to protect itself from electri- 
cal interference from your 
computer's motherboard 
and other cards, you really 
can record audio that 
sounds as good or nearly 
as good as an audio CD. 

Keep one thing in mind, 
though. At audio-CD quali- 



ty (16-bit stereo sampling 
at 44 kHz), each minute 
you record will take up 
approximately lOfVlB on 
your hard drive. Before you 
mix down that new album 
you're working on, you 
might want to order an 
extra-large and extra-fast 
hard drive (can you say the 
word gigabyte without 
fainting dead away into 
your chair?). You'll also 
need a fast processor to 
handle the huge amounts 
of data that will be moving 
through your machine. 

Another solution is to 
purchase a dedicated 
recording system such as 
Yamaha's CBX-D5 Digital 
Recording Processor. It's 



controlled by your PC's 
software, but it uses its 
own set of SCSI-based 
hard drives. The CBX-D5 
includes a built-in DSP 
(Digital Signal Processor), 
has DEQ (Digital EQual- 
ization), provides four-track 
16-bit recording, and 
works with any Windows 
3.1-compatible PC. Of 
course, you'll have to fork 
over $2,995 for the 
CBX-D5 and another 
$400-S2,000 for a 
SCSI hard drive, 
but you did 
say you 
wanted a 
first-class horn 
recording studio 
didn't you? 




Jazz: A Multimedia History, 
The New Grolier fyiultimedia 
Ency-clopedia, and hun- 
dreds of other Win-dows- 
based multimedia applica- 
tions. You'll be ab-le to cap- 
ture and play back software- 
based video files using 
Video for Windows and 
QuickTime for Windows. 
And you'll be able to add 
audio to your presentations, 

Altec Lansing Multimedia 
ACS-300 speaker system 



with programs such as 
Action! and Compel. 

Second, you can add 
sounds to your various 
Windows system events. 
While it's true that this isn't 
really a serious use of 
sound, that's the point — to 
have some fun. It's a way to 
personalize your computing 
environment. For instance, I 
use the computer sound 
effects 




from "Star Trek: The Next 
Generation" for my system 
sounds. They're short and 
unobtrusive, and they cre- 
ate a high-tech mood. In 
the past, I've used HAL 
9000 recordings from the 
movie 2001: A Space 
Odyssey ("Human error" for 
an error message and "I'm 
completely operational, and 
all my circuits are function- 
ing perfectly" for a Windows 
startup sound). Sound 
Source Unlimited 
(800-877-4778) 
sells collections of 
sounds from both 
the original "Star 
Trek" and "Next 
Generation", as 
well as a collection 
of sounds from 
2001 ($59.95 
each). Micro-soft 
(206-882-8080) 
' offers similar col- 

lections of movie, car- 
toon, and musical instru- 
ment sounds, called Sound- 
Bits ($39.95 each). 

The third thing you can 
do with Windows audio is to 



"1 



manipulate sound files. In 
fact, with a capable 16-bit 
sound card and sound-edit- 
ing program, you'll have the 
makings of a near-studio- 
quality digital editing sys- 
tem. I'm not exaggerating, 
either; we're talking about 
high-quality stereo record- 





C^ 




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9 


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Wave for Window 2. 
ing direct to your hard 
drive, with cut-and-paste 
editing and nondestructive 
digital effects, such as 
echo, reverb, flange, fade, 
reverse, volume, and pan. 
Sound-editing packages 
such as Wave for Windows 
2.0 (Turtle Beach, 717-843- 
6916, $149) and Sound 
Forge 2.0 (Sonic Foundry, 
608-256-3133, S179) let you 
alter sounds in ways that 



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Top Windows Sound Downloads 

What are people downloading these days in audio 

software? Here's a list of some of the most popular 
audio downloads from CompuServe's Windows Fun 
Forum (!ype winfun). It's a good indication of what 
people are doing these days with Windows audio. 

Speakr. An alternative to Microsoft's PC speaker dri- 
ver. Hear WAV files through your PC's internal speak- 
er without a sound card. 5245 downloads. 

Wave After Wave 2.5. A WAV file, MIDI file, and 
audio-CD player for Windows that includes drag and 
drop, file deleting, and command line playing. 3428 
downloads. 

Wave Editor. Includes filtering and transform capabil- 
ities, as well as FFT transforms. 2619 downloads. 

WinWav. Lets you attach WAV files to many 
Windows system events. Includes quarterly and 
hourly chimes. 2350 downloads. 



WavConv. Converts sound files among the popular 

sound file formats. 2173 downloads. 

CD Player 2.0. Lets you catalog your audio CDs by 
title, artist, track times, record label, and musical cate- 
gory, as well as play up to 30 selected tracks of your 
CD from Windows. 2067 downloads. 

Whoop It Up!. Attach WAV and MIDI files to 
Windows applications, message box icons, and sys- 
tem events. 1989 downloads. 

Sound Blaster Pro Win 3.1 Drivers. The latest 
Sound Blaster Pro drivers for Windows. 1888 down- 
loads. 

EXCUSE.WAV. A WAV file from "Star Trek: The Next 
Generation" with Data saying "Excuse me." 1 857 down- 
loads. 

WinWlOD Pro. A MOD file sequence player for Windows. 
Lets you play MOD format sound files (popular with 
Amiga cxamputers) on your PC. 1 1 27 downloads. 



PC Sound Glossary 

ADC. Short for Analog-to- 
Digital Converter. A circuit 
that converts an analog 
audio signal into a digital 
audio signal. See also ana- 
log, digital, and DAG. 

analog. An audio signal 
whose fluctuating voltage 
pattern reflects the struc- 
ture of the original sound.- 
See also digital. 

CD-DA. Short for Compact 
Disc-Digital Audio. Also 
known as Red Book audio. 
The CD-quality audio that 
comes directly from a coven- 
tional audio CD or CD-ROM. 

DAC. Short for Digital-to- 
Analog Converter. A circuit 
that converts a digital audio 
signal into an analog audio 
signal. See also analog, 
digital, and ADC. 

digital. An audio signal that 
has been converted into 



numbers that no longer 
directly reflect the structure 
of the original sound. See 
also analog. 

General MIDI, An exten- 
sion of MIDI that establish- 
es a standard set of 128 
instrument sounds that are 
grouped in a standard 
order. See also MIDI. 

Hz. Short for hertz. A unit 
used to measure the fre- 
quency of a vibrating 
object, such as a violin 
string or the cone in a 
speaker. Also known as 
cycles per second. The 
human ear can hear from 
approximately 20 Hz to 20 
kHz (20 to 20,000 Hz). 

MIDI. Short for Musical 
Instrument Digital Interface. 
Pronounced "middy." A dig- 
ital communications proto- 
col that allows electronic 
musical instruments and 
computers to communicate 
with each other. Because 



MIDI sends performance 
information (such as note 
on, note off, pitch change, 
instrument change, and 
volume) rather than actual 
musical sounds, it's a high- 
ly efficient way to store and 
transmit musical data. 

MIDI interface. A serial 
hardware device that 
allows a computer to send 
and receive MIDI data. 

MPC. Short for Multimedia 
PC. Any computer, upgrade 
product, or software title 
that conforms to the stan- 
dards set by the Multimedia 
PC Marketing Council. 

multimedia. The combina- 
tion of graphics, sound, ani- 
mation, and video in a sin- 
gle software program. 
Sometimes only two or 
three of these elements are 
needed in order for a pro- 
gram to be called a multi- 
media program. Also, any 
PC, upgrade product, or 



software title that conforms 
to the MPC standard. 

sound card. Also known 
as a sound board. An 
expansion board you place 
inside a PC that improves 
the quality of the PC's 
sound output. A program 
must support the sound 
board before it can benefit 
from the board's improved 
sound quality. 

synthesizer. An electronic 
musical instrument that can 
generate simple or complex 
sounds. Most synthesizers 
include a MIDI interface 
and a keyboard, though 
synthesizers without a built- 
in keyboard are becoming 
more common. 

waveform audio. A tech- 
nique for re-creating voice 
and sound effects using 
digital audio samples. 
Under Windows, waveform 
audio is generally stored 
with the WAV extension. 



82 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



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A rip has been detected in the fabric of time. Only moments remain until 
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• Photorealistic 3D modeled worlds to explore • Over 30 minutes of full motion video 

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completely operational, and 
all my circuits are function- 
ing perfectly" for a Windows 
startup sound). Sound 
Source Unlimited (800-877- 
4778) sells collections of 
sounds from bothi thie origi- 
nal "Star Trek" and "Next 
Generation", as well as a 
collection of sounds from 
2001 ($59.95 each). Micro- 
soft (206-882-8080) offers 
similar collections of movie, 
cartoon, and musical instru- 
ment sounds, called Sound- 
Bits ($39.95 each). 

The third thing you can 
do with Windows audio is to 
manipulate sound files, In 
fact, with a capable 16-bit 
sound card and sound-edit- 
ing program, you'll have the 
makings of a near-studio- 
quality digital editing sys- 
tem. I'm not exaggerating, 
either; we're talking about 
high-quality stereo record- 
ing direct lo your hard 




4-j^t 



■^T* 






Harp 

The harp is me on^ annged instrumera 
in the ordiesira iha; i s never played 
v«that»w iRstead. 9k p!ayaf m3t<«s 
Its Mrinfls viOrete by pickng themv^th 
his Angers. 

Tha harp is a handscme thred-comefed 
instrumertnith many strings and a set 
of pedals 31 th9 botlom thopedals 
work mschneiy that changes tne tangtti 
of the smngs. which changes their pitch 

You may not always find the harp in the 
orchestra, as Bw cider composer 
seldom wote parts for it. M tJioOem 
compositions often cal for qoe or tv*o 
iiarps. Of evefi mofe. The harp's main 
ttxyisplayngacconnpaniirienisin 



Opcode Interactive's The Musical World of Professor Piccolo 



drive, with cut-and-paste 
editing and nondestructive 
digital effects, such as 
echo, reverb, flange, fade, 
reverse, volume, and pan. 
Sound-editing packages 
such as Wave for Windows 
2.0 (Turtle Beach, 717-843- 



6916, $149) and Sound 
Forge 2.0 (Sonic Foundry, 
608-256-3133, $179) let you 
alter sounds in ways that 
recording studios would 
have killed for just 10 or 15 
years ago. Turtle Beach 
also offers an excellent 



introductory sound pack- 
age for Windows, called 
Turtle Tools ($89). It 
includes a relatively power- 
ful wave editor, several use- 
ful MIDI utilities, and a CD- 
ROM with over 300 sound 
effects and musical pieces. 

Sound Off 

I've only skimmed the sur- 
face of what you can do 
with Windows and sound. 
With a sound card becom- 
ing a necessary component 
of any new PC and talk of 
adding audio circuitry to 
many new motherboards, 
expect to see some exciting 
new audio technologies — 
such as voice recognition 
and video conferencing — 
being integrated into your 
everyday computing envi- 
ronment. With all this new 
audio technology, you won't 
be able to keep Windows 
quiet any longer. □ 



How to Add Sound to 
Your Laptop 

Laptops run on batteries 
and can't use sound cards, 
so you can't have sound 
on a laptop. 




right? Not exactly. There 
are several ways you can 
add sound to your Win- 
dows-based laptop. 

Buy a parallel-port 
sound device. These 
small boxes plug into 
your parallel port 
and offer sound 
that varies from ade- 
quate (when using 
the device's built-in 
speaker) to excel- 
ent (when con- 
nected to high- 
quality speakers). 
Most work well 
with Windows 
programs, with 



full support for WAV files 
and limited support for 
MIDI files (using F=M synthe- 
sis). DOS support is also 
limited, varying from no 
DOS support (Logitech's 
AudioMan) to support for 
most DOS programs only 
when they run under 
Windows (Media Vision's 
Audioport) to support for 
most DOS programs run- 
ning under DOS (DSP 
Solutions PORTI'ABLE 
Sound Plus). These 
devices run on batteries, 
so they won't directly drain 
your laptop's own batter- 
ies, though you may 
encounter some slight 
drain from the additional 
use of the parallel port 

Buy a PCMCIA sound 
card. If you have a laptop 
with a Type tl PCMCIA 
slot, you can use the 
MediaShare Tempo (Me- 
diaShare, 619-931-7171, 



$295), It's a PCMCIA 
sound card that can play 
WAV and MIDI files in 
Windows and is compati- 
ble with DOS software that 
supports the Ad Lib and 
Sound Blaster standards. 
It even has provisions for a 
MIDI interface. 

Try a PC speaker 
sound driver. Microsoft 
has developed a driver that 
lets your PC speaker play 
back WAV files. With some 
PCs, you can barely hear 
the sounds; with others, 
you may have interrupt 
problems in Windows. You 
can often find it online (on 
CompuServe, type go msl 
and download SPEAK- 
.EXE), and it's included in 
Sound Source Unlimited's 
WAV file collections. Even if 
you do get it to work, you'll 
find it doesn't work well with 
all kinds of sounds. Still, it's 
worth a try. 



in ifmm\» 



overpriced 
s car. 



:m 




ijust dont cry when 

youre snaimg a cell 

with a bigjat guy who 



'cks hi 



IS nose,, 



8 



^^g^ 







The game has tons of cool video clips just like this one. Only different. 



?all kinds of laws in one of four European Racers. Integrated video, 

tips on equipment and weather conditions while you try to outrun' the cops - 

t'f^f^ and race on four different tracks. 3-D animated instructions help you build a 
.' model of your car so you can remember what it looks like after you wrap it ; i 

round a guard rail. Available for IBM on CD-ROM and Sega CD. ^ 

he model makes the JHHbetter. The game makes the m 




NEW IVnJLTl MEDIA PRODUCTS 



Edited by 
Lisa Young and 
Phillip Morgan 

OPEN WINDOWS TO FUN 

Daily computer chores can 
get monotonous, but Moon 
Valley Software tias devel- 
oped a new multimedia 
product that will open your 
Windows to fun by replac- 
ing standard screen graph- 
ics with animated icons, 
cursors, and backdrops. 

ROMaterial uses sight 
and sound as a weapon 
against boredom. Replac- 
ing ordinary wallpaper, 
ROMaterial's backdrops are 
color images that come to 
life as moving pictures. Fifty 
of the most popular icons in 
Icon Hear-lt and Icon Do-It, 









•'^ ;^, ._. . , ,, 1 




4 ii hp i 


r.:^ 1 


■^•■_l."r?sH T .,11 







Moon Valley's ROMaterial 

including the familiar happy 
face and oversize arrow cur- 
sors, are also featured with 
f\/loon Valley's new creations. 

As you sift through the 
Windows menus and dialog 
boxes, you can hear any 
combination of impres- 
sions, languages, and 
sounds. ROMaterial fea- 
tures many of the sounds 
found on the original Icon 
Hear-lt along with new 
vocal effects, including the 
voice of Ross Perot, the 
calls of animals, and the 
sounds of musical instru- 
ments. 

ROMaterial requires 
Windows 3.1 and a CD- 
ROM drive. 

Moon Valley Software 

(800) 473-5509 

S29.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 530 

86 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



MORPH TRANSFORMS 

WINDOWS 

With Gryphon software's 
Morph for Windows, you 
can create the same spe- 
cial effects on your home 
computer that were used to 
transform objects in movies 
such as Terminator II and 
Jurassic Park and on recent 
television commercials. 

Morphing is a two- 
dimensional special effect 
that smoothly transforms 
one still image into another. 
Time used this technology 
when promoting its "Agony 
in Africa" issue. The maga- 
zine's commercial began 
with the image of a young 
child, which transformed 
into a skull and then 
became an image of the 
African continent. Crest 
also used morphing to 
advertise its baking soda 
toothpaste in a commer- 
cial. It began v/ith a box of 
baking soda, which 
changed into a tube of 
toothpaste. 

You can save each 
morph as a Video for Win- 
dows movie, or an FLI or 
FLC animation, and place it 
on videotape or film tor 
commercial-quality output. 




Morph for Windows 

You can also save a single 
still image or series of 
images in a variety of com- 
mon file formats including 
TIFF, GIF, and Targa. 

Gryphon Software 

(619) 536-8815 

SI 69 

Circle Reader ServlceNumber 531 




FlexCam from VideoLab 

MULTIMEDIA COMES 
HOME 

Now you can generate 
complete multimedia pro- 
ductions on your home 
computer with VideoLabs' 
FlexCam, the first integrat- 
ed color camera and micro- 
phone system designed for 
desktop video and commu- 
nications. 

The FlexCam incorpo- 
rates a high-resolution, 
color CCD camera and two 
microphones. It outputs 
color NTSC video and 
industry-standard, line-level 
audio to VCRs, video con- 
ferencing systems, and any 
other product that accepts 
NTSC or PAL video. 
Mounted on an 18-inch flex- 
ible wand for precise cam- 
era positioning, the 
FlexCam is compatible with 
all popular video digitizing 
boards offered for Microsoft 
Video for Windows. 

Because of its unique 
design, you can position 
the FlexCam directly in front 
of the screen for true eye- 
to-eye contact. With other 
systems, the camera is 
located to the side or on top 
of the computer, and you 
can only see the profile of 
the user. The flexible neck 
is also ideal for document 
capture and other desktop 
video uses. 



VideoLabs 
(612)897-1995 
S595(intheU.S.) 
S695 (elsewhere) 

Circle Reader Service Number 532 

LAPTOP VIDEO 

The Presenter Video 
Capture, introduced by 
Consumer Technology 
Northwest, combines video 
transfer technology with the 
convenience of laptop and 
notebook computers. The 
portable unit lets you con- 
vert still images from a 
video-recording device into 
a computer-generated doc- 
ument. 

Compatible with all DOS 
and Windows applications, 
the Presenter Video Capture 
can scan full-color video 
images with as many as 
32,768 colors. You can use it 
with video recorders, digital 
cameras, camcorders, and 
any NTSC input device. 

Weighing only 5.35 
ounces, the Presenter 
Video Capture can be con- 
veniently carried with your 
laptop or notebook comput- 
er, though it can also be 
used with any desktop. The 
unit simply plugs into a par- 
allel port. All the required 
hardware and software are 
included in the package. 

Consumer Technology 

Northwest 

(BOO) 356-3983 

$319 

Circle Header Service Number 533 

MULTIMEDIA BY 
SUBSCRIPTION 

Newsweek InterActive, a 
multimedia CD-ROM maga- 
zine created by the editors 
of Newsweek, is now avail- 
able quarterly by subscrip- 
tion or by single issues at 
leading retail stores. 

Each quarterly edition will 
include as many as three 
original articles on current 



SORKARAOI^ 




^ 



For Windows... 



Out of the Shower, into your PC 

step right upl Get on the mike! Turn your PC's sound board into a 
full-fledged home karaoke! Take advantage of this jam-packed introductory 
offer ana get yourself the most complete karaoke ever to be produced! 



SOFT KARAOKE VERSION 1.0 for WINDOWS 




The best karaoke experience 

Lyrics appear verse by vet3e and light up to the right beat Simple 
commands allow you to enjoy karaoke fun like never before. You can 
select your favorite song, change any or all the musical instruments, and 
adjust the volume of individual tracks. Do you have a hard time hitting 
those high notes? No problem... just lower the pitch to match your 
range! Is the song too fast for you to keep up? Slow it down! SOFT 
KARAOKE brand software is the first and only karaoke tfiat allows you to 
set the pitch and speed of ttie music to your liking! Great for parties as 
you entertain your friends (or let them entertain you) by singing all the 
greatest hits. You might even ask your boss to sing along at a Happy 
Hour" office party (at the end of the evening}! With the mike in your 
hands and tne words on the screen, you'll be all set for the newest 
entertainment experience on PC! 



All kinds of songs, all kinds of stars 
SOFT KARAOKE brand software plays SOFT KARAOKE LPs which include 
songs made famous by star like Hton John and Madonna. All songs come 
in MIDI KARAOKE file format and respect their original orchestrations. 
Whatever your tastes, there's a SOFT KARAOKE LP for you! 

Just what your sound board was designed for 

Finally, a multimedia product that uses your Soundblaster, Adiib, or 
other popular sound board to its full extent whether it is the 
Wavetable lookup or FM synthesis type. 

Compatible with your own sound software 

Use your Windows sound software to mix in your voice, mute out the 
melody, and even record your own performances! 




UDED_^ ^^ 



NCLUDED 



As if the SOFTKARAOKE tend software wasnt enough on 0. 
its own,you'll also receive a fabulous SOFT KARAOKE LP absolu- 
tely fteel Take advantage of this unbelievable offer while you can. 
AIISOFT KARAOKE LP songs come in MIDI KARAOKE file format. 




Act quickly and get a sieek microphone with your 

SOFT KARAOKE brand software! Designed to plug into 

your sound board, it will come in handy for your singing and 

other multimedia needs. Huny! Offer is available while supplies last! 




Call toll-free 1-800-363-TUNE Or see your nearest dealer 

1-800-363-8863 



TUNE 1000 are trademarks of THE UNIVERSAL NETWORK OF EWrERXAINIVlENT. 



■y^ SOFT KW?AOK€, MIDI KARAOKE and 

Other names are trademarks of their respective owners. 

TUNE 1000 Corp., Suite lOOOA, 295 Forest Avenue, Portland, ME 041 01 -2000 Tel: (418)877-8900, Fax: (418) 877-9994 

Circle Reader Service Number 202 



m 



I THE UNIVERSAL 
NETWORK 0? 
I ENTERTAINMENT' 




NEW MLILTEVIEDIA PIlODLCl S 



■'■■ I.I .111 '"J 




u-f m 



3^A\ 



Newsweek Interactive 

news topics. The format 
combines text, audio, video, 
animations, narration, and 
plioto essays into easy-to- 
use multimedia presenta- 
tions, including interactive 
simulations tliat let you get 
personally involved in thie 
news. Three months of 
Newsweek print editions and 
hundreds of articles from the 
Washington Post are includ- 
ed and can be searched by 
keyword. Also in each issue 
are broadcast interviews 
from "Newsweek on Air," a 
coproduction of Newsweek 
and The Associated Press 
Radio Network. 

Newsweek InterActive is 
published for IBM-compati- 
ble computers with CD- 
ROM drives, as well as the 
Sony Multimedia CD-ROM 
Player. Additional formats 
will be available in the 
future, 

Newsweek 
(800) 634-6850 
$129.95 (per year) 
$49.95 (per issue) 

Circle Reader Service Number 534 

CHECK IT OUT 

Your next visit to the local 
library could bring a few 
surprises. On the shelves 
next to the books, you may 
find an assortment of CD- 
ROM titles that you can 
check out and enjoy in your 
own home. 

Compton's NewMedia, a 
publisher and distributor of 
CD-ROM titles, is offering 
libraries a specially marked 
series of reference, music, 
88 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



travel, business, and chil- 
dren's titles. Packages are 
available in assortments of 
10. 20, and 40 titles and 
include display holders that 
make it easy for libraries to 
promote their new CD-ROM 
collections. 

The library lending pro- 
gram iS based on a similar 
program for video rental 
Stores launched by Comp- 
ton's NewMedia earlier this 
year. Following multiple 
reorders from the video 
stores, Compton's NewMed- 
ia has increased both the 
number of titles and the num- 
ber of participating stores. 

Under current law, soft- 
ware rental is illegal without 
approval from the software 
publisher. In this case, 
Compton's NewMedia has 
obtained the rights and will 
provide special discs and 
packaging earmarked for 
lending only to the partici- 
pating libraries and video 
rental stores, 

Compton's NewMedia 

(800)344-2621 

$1,700 to $3,800 

Circle Reader Service Number 535 

MULTIMEDIA GOES 
MULTIMARKET 

It may be some time before 
pixels supplant the printed 
word and bookstores be- 
come disc stores, but CD 
encyclopedias have al- 
ready made their way onto 
booksellers' shelves. 
Compton's Learning Com- 
pany and Compton's New- 
Media have put together 
The Compton's Combo, a 
true multimedia package to 
market through bookstores 
and software stores alike. It 
includes both the printed 
and CD-ROM versions of 
the 9-million-word Comp- 
ton's Encyclopedia. 

The package you buy in 
the store includes the first 
volume of the printed ency- 



clopedia, as well as Comp- 
ton's Interactive Encyclo- 
pedia for Windows on CD- 
ROM. The CD-ROM version 
includes the complete text 
of the printed version; 
sound, animation, and full- 
motion video; and Smar- 
Theve, for natural-language 
text search. A mail-in 
coupon is included for the 
other 25 printed volumes, 
which will be shipped to 
you at no additional charge. 
Compton's NewMedia 
hopes the Combo will encour- 
age booksellers to add addi- 



already available. 

The system has an active 
vocabulary of 1000 words 
taken from a base vocabu- 
lary of 20,000. Developers 
can extend the vocabulary 
to include industry-specific 
terminology. Unlike many 
speech systems, (CSS 
doesn't require a pause 
between words or special 
training for users. According 
to IBM, number recognition 
will be highly accurate, so 
entering long lists of num- 
bers into a spreadsheet 
won't be as tedious as it Is 




Tlie Compton's Combo from Compton's NewMedia 



tional CD-ROM titles to their 
shelves as CD-ROM drives 
become more common. 

Compton's NewMedia 

(619)929-2500 

$498 

Circle Reader Service Number 536 

CAN YOU SAY "SUI"? 

Talking to your computer 
might not be as futuristic as 
you think. IBM has an- 
nounced a developer's 
toolkit that will allow software 
makers to produce Speech 
User Interfaces (SUI) for 
their Windows applications. 

The IBM Continuous 
Speech Series (ICSS) for 
Windows is scheduled for 
release by the end of 1993. 
OS/2 and AIX versions are 



with a keyboard. Typos and 
transpositions could be vir- 
tually eliminated. 

Lotus displayed a demo 
program of 1-2-3 using 
ICSS for OS/2 in IBM's 
booth at the recent PC 
Expo in New York. 
WordPerfect showed its 
demo based on IBM's 
Speech Server Series 
(ISSS), a related technolo- 
gy. Neither company has 
committed to IBM, but it's 
apparently a strong con- 
tender. Future applications 
from these and other com- 
panies will likely use voice 
recognition for both naviga- 
tion and dictation. 

IBM 

(800) IBM-CALL 



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KEUIN DESIGNED A GAME WITH S6 TOOLS, IG0 
PUZZLES, AND THOUSANDS OF POSSIBLE SOLATIONS. 




KEimrS GOT WAY T MUCH TIME 




The E\-en More Incredible Machine. E\-en 
more incredible than the original. We're 
talkin' Compuler Game Reiiew's 
"Puzzle Game of the Year." It's our 
latest puzzle contraption game for 
the ob,ses,sive-compuLsive lurking within you. 
It starts off innocendy enough. Creating 
elaborate con- 

traptions by rig- * - ■" -"* -* ' ' 

ging conveyer 
belts, bellows, 







and teeter-tot- 
ters to shoot 
.some hoops, 
pop some bal- 
loons, or fill some buckets, Before you 
know it, you're spending hours shooting 
goldfish, pushing cats 
off cliffs, and feeding little 
men to alligators. Yes, alligators. 

And as if that's not enough, there's 
over "0 new puzzles, 1 1 new- tools, and a 



'"'^^WF 



EDynsmix^ 




4 




free fonn mode so you can create your 
own puzzles and drive \'nur 
friends crazy. Just like Kevin 
did to you. 

Kevin's crossed that fine line bem-een 
genius and insanity. Why not join iiim? 



te your 



evet^ 



VV\6*'^ 




Available at retail for 

IBM / compalibles. Windows, Macintosh. 

$19,95 updates for registered owners. 

Call 1-800-757-7707 



PART OF THE SIERRA FAMILY 



"" OH ® AHE TRADEMARKS OF. Ofi LICENSED 70 OVKAMIX. INC. ©1993 3YriAUII. INC. WlfiCOVS IS A tBAOEMABK OF MiCSOSOf T C0HPOR4TION 



YOUR BELLY TANK IS ON FIRE. 

YOUR RADIO IS GONE. 

YOUR AIR FIELD IS 135 MILES AWAY. 

GODSPEED. 





^' 






V >ffi WAR 







V 




Fly all new air-to-ground 
missions, take out enemy 
bridges, and strafe 
armored vehicles. face off 
against famous wwii aces 
SUCH AS Adolf Galland and 
Hub Zemke. 



OAR THROUGH 
FLAK-FILLED SKIES IN 
THE COCKPIT OF YOUR 
SUPERMARINE 
SPITFIRE. Or one OF 
1 5 OTHER AIRCRAFT 
FROM THE INFAMOUS 
SECOND WORLD WAR. 




Forces Actin\; nn 
an AirpUme 



Tlirus! 




Ships burn in the 
WATER. Oil drums 
blow on the horizon. 
You're flying for the 

BRITISH RAF one day. 

The German 
Luftwaffe, the next. 




.i^VAILABLE AT RETAIL FOR IBf.1 /COMPATIBLES. 
OR CALL I -800-7S7-7707. 



Aces Over Europe 

The latest in the great War Planes series. 




Dynamix: 

•^ DinrnFTHF <^1FRRA FAMILY 



PART OF THE SIERRA FAMILY 



™ AND ® ARE 1RADEUARKS OF, OR LICENSCED ;0, DYNAUm. IMC © 1993 DVIIAMIX. INC. 






■ 






m 


BHIbi 


fs W~ UE Bs HS I'A 


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S^K* ^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 


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«te^:fc£52fe^£g 




•'are gem! Betrayal At Krondor sets new standards farj%i 
-Jay Kee, Computer Gaming World, O0oti 



V% 



..— ->^Js4.»-.- 




m'" 



}' «. -^ '^'^^ 



I At Kron 
chapter vl 
sy universe^ 
ic, adventu"" 



iiizedacursxiii 
„r*ly contpine w 
iff fampua3Sg^|)- 



technolflay ,10 create 



and strengths 
y5u'Battle bloodthirsty 
[l^s^rmies at every turn. 




ji^miQ^^ 



Experience the betrayal. 
WelcoimjaiJiaaidor., 



_^ , PART OF THE SIERHA FAMILY '■ 

tail for IBM/compatibles^rcall t^600-757-7707. '*'" and C/are trademarks of, or licensed to D^ NAMIX.INC. ^. 1993 DYfifSfDli, 



m MINUS 25 DEGREES, 

WINDS ARE HOWUNG AT 45 MPH 

AND THERE'S TWELVE FEET 

OF SNOW ON THE GROUND. 

FOOTBAU ANYONE? 



That's right. Football. Yeah, in this 
weather. What are you a wimp? This 
Is how foott)all was meant to be 
played. 

FrontPage 
Sports: 
Football Pro 
is the real 
thing. For 
the die-hard fan who lives for 
Sunday aftemoons and can't stand 
the thought of the off- 
season. 

You're not just coach for 
a day. You run the 
whole league for the 



whole season with real ^^^^^^^^ 
NFL rosters and stats. 





-? J-" Afcfr".' , 

■.;si- ■ V"; ■ 'f 



You're in charge. 

You're the coach so you 
control everything, from 
designing your own 
plays to signing free 
agents and making 
trades. There's even 
a college draft! Sub 
in and out whenever you want. 

Design uniform colors. 

This is your chance to 
prove you can coach 
your way out of a 
paper bag. So pick 



Dyn^mix: 

■^ PART OF THE SJERRA FAMILY 




% o\s 



yourteam, call the 
plays, and watch your 
players spin, flip, dive 
and risk career-ending 

Injuries. 



Front Page Sporte: Football Pro. So 
real, you'll wish you were wearing a 
helmet. 




Available at retail for IBM/compatibles. 
Or call 1-800-757-7707. 



Officialiy licensed product of Sie Na Playe/s Associalon 



TM OR ® ARE TRADEMARKS OF, OR UCENSED TO DYNAMIX, INC. © ® 1 993 DYNAMIX INC. 




NEW IVIULTIIVIEDTA PRODUCTS 



$299 (single user, standard 
microphone) 

$699 (single user, high- 
quality microphone) 

Circle Reader Service Number 537 

WALK SOFT RUNS 
HARD NEWS ONIINE 

Hold the presses — in fact, 
forget the presses. Walk 
Soft has taken the paper out 
of newspaper and replaced 
it with your computer moni- 
tor, complete with sound 
and animation. News in 
Motion is the first online mul- 
timedia newspaper in the 
U.S. It's currently available 
as a weekly, but it will soon 
be issued as a daily 
(Monday through Friday). 

You can download the 
"paper" every Saturday or 
have it sent to you on disk. 
You'll need Windows 3.1 
and DOS 5.0 or higher. Its 
news and editorials come 
from agencies around the 
world: Reuters, The Eco- 
nomist, Le Monde. Asahi 
Shimbun, Der Spiegel, and 
others. Color photos, gra- 
phics, and political car- 
toons accompany the text, 
and sound and animation 
bring the news to life. 

News in Motion also 
includes the soft news and 
fluff that so many readers 
find endearing in their 
favorite news magazines 
and papers. It has animat- 
ed horoscopes and comics, 
the Frugal Gourmet, and 
defense coverage from 
Jane's Defense Weekly. 

Subscriptions are avail- 
able for 1, 3, 6, and 12 
months. Rates are higher 



than for weekly news maga- 
zines or daily papers — 
$4.80 per issue for a 12- 
month subscription — but 
downloading is toll-free if 
you use a 9600-bps or 
faster modem. 

Walk Soft 
(716)271-8250 
$250 (12 months) 

Circle Reader Service Number 53S 

IT'S NOT THE CARD 
YOU HEAR 

As any audiophile will tell 
you, the best stereo in the 
world sounds only as good 
as its speakers. Since the 
same principle applies to 
computer sound systems, 
your choice of speakers is 
as important as your choice 
of a sound card. 

The ACS50 amplified 
speaker system from Altec 
Lansing offers you many of 
the features of high-fidelity 
home-audio speakers and 
amplifiers. The two-way 
speakers have 2 1/2- x 
1 1/4-inch midbass drivers 
and 3/4-inch ferrofluid- 
cooled dome tweeters. 
They're magnetically shield- 
ed so you can place them 
beside your monitor without 
interference, and they're 
matched with the amplifier 
for optimum frequency re- 
sponse. 

The amplifier mounts 
onto your monitor, so the 




^....^^^^^ 



Altec Lansing 's ACS50 speaker system 




Vdeck 500 from Sony Computer Peripheral Products 



headphone jack and volume 
control are on the front of 
your computer rather than 
on the sound card. Circuitry 
for bass and treble boost 
are built into the amplifier. 

Altec Lansing 
(800) 258-3288 
$100 

Circle Reader Service Number 539 

VDECK, VISCA, AND 
OTHER VIDEO VERNAC- 
ULAR 

Sony has added a second 
8-mm VCR to its Vdeck 
series. Like the first Vdeck 
(the CVD-1000 Hi8), the 
new Vdeck 500 was 
designed to be a computer 
peripheral rather than sim- 
ply a VCR you can connect 
to your computer. Sony's 
Video System Control 
Architecture (VISCA) is built 
into the deck, so you can 
connect it directly to your 
computer and control it with 
your video-editing software 
using VISCA drivers. 

The Vdeck has a number 
of professional features for 
precise editing, including 
time coding for highly accu- 
rate searching and dubbing, 
input and output jacks for 



communicating with other 
devices in a VISCA daisy- 
chain, and voice boost for 
voice enhancement and 
background noise reduction. 

You can also expect to 
see more video software for 
Windov^s. Microsoft has 
incorporated VISCA proto- 
col into its new Media 
Control Interface (MCI) dri- 
vers. Software developers 
can use these drivers to 
create video-editing soft- 
ware that can control your 
camcorder, VCR, and other 
video devices. The plat- 
form-independent VISCA 
protocol has already been 
used in drivers for Mac- 
intosh and other systems, 
but the system-level sup- 
port offered by Microsoft's 
new MCI drivers should 
prompt many new PC appli- 
cations. Desktop video may 
soon be as common as 
desktop publishing. 

Developers can down- 
load the new drivers from 
Sony's Bulletin Board 
Service at (408) 955-5107. 

Sony Computer Peripheral 
Products 
(800) 352-7669 
$1,099 

Circle Reader Service Number 540 

r^OVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 99 




SPOTLIGHT 



PC KARAOKE AND 
SOFT KARAOKE 

These days, nightclubs are 
famous for their karaol<Le 
machines, which encour- 
age fun-loving (and often 
alcohol-sodden) folks to get 
up in front of a crowd and 
bark out a hit song, all to 
the recorded accompani- 
ment of a full ensemble and 
background singers. Now, 
two new software products, 
PC Karaoke {Sirius 
Publishing, 602-951-3288, 
$99.95) and Soft Karaoke 
(Tune 1000. 800-363-8863, 
$49.95), let you do your 
crooning at home. And 
while both products do a 
great job of replacing the 
standard karaoke machine, 
they're as different as Frank 
Sinatra and Nirvana. 

PC Karaoke is, from an 
options point of view, the 
simpler of the two products. 
A CD-ROM-based Win- 
dows program that features 
256-color graphics, studio- 
recorded music, and action 
video sequences, PC Kara- 
oke synciironizes onscreen 
lyrics with the beautifully 
arranged and professionally 
recorded songs. 

When you run the pro- 
gram, you see a full-screen 
graphical menu depicting 
the songs on the current 
disc. To choose a song, 
simply click on its picture. 
The song's graphic then fills 
the screen, after which the 
song loads and begins to 
play, highlighting the lyrics 
on the screen as it goes. 

If you want to sing along 
with all 12 of the musical 
selections on the disc, you 
can click on KJ's Top 12 
Countdown. This brings up 
a karaoke jockey (the 
karaoke version of a disk 
jockey), who gets you start- 
ed on your musical tour and 
pops in now and then with 
some humorous silliness. 

100 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Extra song discs are 
available from Sirius for 
$15.95 each. The current 
catalog features 40 discs 
that cover all kinds of 
music, from Broadway 
show tunes and movie 
soundtracks to hard rock 
and rap. The disc that 
comes with PC Karaoke 
features a wide range of 
selections, including 
"You've Lost That Lovin' 
Feelin'," "Twist and Shout," 
"Everything I Do," and 
"Friends in Low Places" — 
12 songs in all. The pack- 



range). In addition, the vol- 
ume control panel lets you 
set each individual Instru- 
ment's volume, and the 
Instrument control panel 
lets you assign any one of 
dozens of different instru- 
ments to any instrument 
track in the song. Of 
course, with the main con- 
trol panel's controls, you 
can play, pause, fast-for- 
ward, and reverse the cur- 
rent song, much as you can 
with a tape deck. 

To get this manipulative 
power, however, you have to 




One of the 12 songs that are included in PC Karaoke 



age includes a certificate 
for two additional discs. 

While PC Karaoke's CD- 
ROM format offers greater 
sound quality, Soft Kara- 
oke's MIDI format (no CD- 
ROM dhve required) offers 
greater flexibility. When you 
run Soft Karaoke, a tape 
player-like control panel 
appears. Using the control 
panel, you can not only 
load and run song files, but 
also manipulate the files in 
various ways. 

For example, you can 
change both the tempo and 
key (changing the key is 
especially valuable for peo- 
ple with a limited vocal 



give up a certain amount of 
sound quality. This is 
because MIDI files aren't 
actual sound recordings but 
files that control MIDI instru- 
ments. To put it simply, all 
the sounds you hear with 
Soft Karaoke are generated 
on a synthesizer, either your 
sound board or some other 
external MIDI instrument. 
The actual quality of the 
sound depends on the quali- 
ty of your synthesizer. (It's 
worth pointing out that much 
of today's natural-sounding 
music is actually created 
with MIDI synthesizers.) 

Soft Karaoke connes with 
five song files, including 



such favorites as "Dust in 
the Wind," "Stand By Your 
Man," and "The Way We 
Were." Additional disks 
containing ten songs each 
sell for $19.95 per disk. In 
its current catalog. Tune 
1000 offers 28 disks; these 
include the usual assort- 
ments as well as collections 
by specific artists such as 
Fleetwood Mac. Michael 
Jackson, Frank Sinatra, and 
Elton John. 

Which product is better? 
That depends on what's 
most important to you. PC 
Karaoke is a sound and 
graphical delight (with a 
price tag that reflects this), 
but it allows no manipula- 
tion of instruments. If you 
like to fiddle with your 
music, and are willing to 
forfeit some sound quality 
and the fancy graphics, 
Soft Karaoke's powerful 
control panel will keep you 
busy for hours. 

The bottom line is that 
both are excellent products, 
differentiated enough from 
each other that they will 
appeal to different seg- 
ments of this niche market. 
Both products install easily 
and work right out of the 
box — as long as you have 
your Windows multimedia 
drivers and mixers set up 
properly. Both include a 
starter set of songs 
(although Soft Karaoke in- 
cludes only 5, compared 
with PC Karaoke's 12), and 
both include microphones 
(although PC Karaoke's 
microphone is of a higher 
quality). 

Whichever program you 
pick, you'll be able to enjoy 
the karaoke experience in 
your own home — which will 
go a long way toward mak- 
ing your next party the hit of 
the block. But do your 
friends a big favor: Practice 
in private first. □ 




Xhe Lat>v«^ii^th of Time 



on e. d. ) 



GiM,. 






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The Labyrinth of Time. An epic fantasy of time travel and 



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ELECTRONIC AUTS- 



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Circle Reader Service Nutntier t12 



PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 



This innovative box of tools 

manages to be both accessible to the beginner 

and deep enough for the power user 

Tom Campbell 

PC TOOLS FOR 
WINDOWS 



Central Point's PC Tools for 
Windows is bigger and sleek- 
er (and more expensive) than 
its DOS version. If you're 
ready for its fresh new feature 
mix, you'fl find it's the Lexus 
of utility packages: big yet 
swift, elegant yet fully function- 
al, more expensive than last 
year's model yet still a great 
value. 

This Windows version of 
PC Tools is a distant relation 
of its smash-hit DOS counter- 
part. It contains a replace- 
ment for the Windows desk- 
top, a File Manager replace- 
ment, a backup program, 
data recovery for thrashed 
disks or files, an antivirus util- 
ity, a system analyzer, a disk 
optimizer, and a BASIC-like 
scripting language. 

There are a few extras 
thrown in too, such as a sched- 
uling program originally de- 
signed to run the backup pro- 
gram but now of general-pur- 
pose use, customization that 
lets you make extensive 
changes to the user interface 
in all of the applications, and 
some wildly creative but un- 
documented screen savers. 

Users of the DOS version 
will note that the telecommuni- 
cations, database, notepad, 
and outliner modules are miss- 
ing and presumed dead: Cen- 
tral Point found that either Win- 
dows had these features al- 
ready or too few users took 
advantage of them. I miss the 
multiwindow notepad and the 
database manager. 

It's within Multidesk, the pro- 
gram's replacement for the 
Windows desktop, that some 
of the best features are 
found, Multidesk knits every- 
thing together and makes 

102 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




good on its promise of offer- 
ing an improvement over Win- 
dows' own desktop. Not only 
is it arguably easier to learn 
and use, but it's also demon- 
strably superior. The best fea- 
tures are QuickLauncher and 
multiple desktops. Quick- 
Launcher lets you add pro- 
gram or folder names to the 
System menu and launch 
them from there, sort of like 
desk accessories on the 
Macintosh. As with the Mac, 
Windows is a multitasking op- 
erating system that presuma- 
bly makes this approach re- 
dundant. Yet, as anyone 
who's ever used desk acces- 
sories on the Mac will tell you, 
doing things this way is so 
much easier than switching to 
the desktop to run a program 
that it makes perfect sense 
once you've given It a test 
drive. 

Perhaps Multidesk's most in- 
novative feature is its multiple 
desktops, which I find much 
harder to explain than to use. 
Instead of being limited to 
one desktop, you can have 
as many as you want. You se- 
lect among these desktops 
by way of a floating palette 
(or a menu, if you don't want 



the palette around). The pal- 
ette shows miniature yet fully 
functional versions of each of 
your custom desktops. It's 
sort of like groups in Program 
Manager, but it's abstracted 
to the desktop itself. 

At first I thought this would 
be a "Who needs it?" feature, 
but i found myself relying on 
it more and more. I had al- 
ready patched together a 
clunky approach using 
groups with Program Manag- 
er. When I realized this, I con- 
verted to Multidesk and 
didn't look back, Plus, I was 
able to employ some other 
working habits I'd planned to 
acquire with Windows 3.0. Mul- 
tidesk's folders, which act 
like supergroups, can be nest- 
ed, allowing me to make use 
of the hierarchical organiza- 
tion I had expected Windows 
to give me. 

All of this presupposes a 
pretty complex hard disk lay- 
out, perhaps one on a net- 
work; for someone who runs 
only one or two applications, 
Multidesk is probably overkill, 
As someone who lives in Win- 
dows all day I found the tran- 
sition to PC Tools smooth and 



natural, but I wondered if it 
was for everyone. 

Eventually I realized that al- 
most everyone using Win- 
dows 3.1 applications proba- 
bly lias a pretty big hard disk 
because the new apps all 
seem to take 10, 20, or 50 
megabytes, strewing complex 
directory structures and hun- 
dreds of files in their wake. So 
SmartFind was a welcome re- 
lief. It lets you search for a 
file on the hard disk or for 
text within a file. SmartFind 
does the expected but ex- 
tends it dramatically allowing 
you to use dates, file attrib- 
utes, and wildcards in one un- 
believably swift package. 

SmartFind, and indeed all 
of PC Tools, worked just 
great on a network. And 
while our network is notably 
lax (everyone uses the same 
password), there are dozens 
of customizing and security op- 
tions for those in more de- 
manding situations. I've never 
encountered an easier prod- 
uct from the network adminis- 
trator's point of view that was 
equally simple on a one-user 
system. 

ScriptTools, the package's 
macro language, is the best 
such Windows script lan- 
guage I've seen. If using 
batch files is your idea of au- 
tomating tasks, you'll be in for 
the thrill of your life when you 
play with ScriptTools. It's a BA- 
SlC-like language with jillions 
of Windows-y features. With it, 
you can create dialog boxes, 
access the Clipboard, time 
events, maintain control over 
the keyboard, gain access to 
DLLs, execute network-relat- 
ed commands, and more. If 
you're not a programmer, 
you'll use ScriptTools to re- 
cord scripts, as you do with 
Windows' own Recorder. But 
ScriptTools comments on 



your scripts, offering a match- 
less opportunity to teach the 
patient nonprogrammer how 
io program, I've seen a lot of 
Windows batch languages, 
and this one is tops. 

PC Tools has a whole 
range of file-recovery pro- 
grams. The installation proc- 
ess gives file recovery top pri- 
ority. If you've bought the prod- 
uct because of a hard disk 
crash, because your hard 
disk's FAT has been fried, or 
because you want to recover 
a damaged dBASE file, the in- 
stallation program won't copy 
the PC Tools files onto your 
hard disk until you've taken 
care of the problem. It pro- 
motes preventive medicine, 
leading you through the crea- 
tion of a disaster-recovery 
disk and even offering a self- 
stick label for the disk. 

In a package this big, 
you're sometimes lucky 
enough to get a fortune cook- 
ie — one of those seemingly 
quirky little surprises that 
threatens to turn into a full- 
time hobby In the case of Win- 
dows 3.0, it was Solitaire. In 
3.1, it was Minesweeper. In 
PC Tools, the screen savers 
seem to fall into this category 
Not even mentioned on the 
box, in the manuals, or in the 
README file, they're appar- 
ent only to the sharp-eyed dur- 
ing installation. Nothing is 
said other than that you can 
leave them out of the installa- 
tion. To see them, you need 
to open the Windows Control 
Panel, choose Desktop, and 
go to Screen Saver. I'll leave 
the rest a surprise, except to 
tell you that Food Fight is my 
favorite, even though it 
needs an 80486 to really do 
its thing. 

I had a few problems with 
the package, all small. The 
manual is hideously underin- 



dexed (the box trumpets 
PKZip file compression and 
decompression, for example, 
but neither ZIP or PKZip are 
in the index). The tape back- 
up software actually replaced 
the original tape backup soft- 
ware that came with my CMS 
backup without telling me, ren- 
dering the tape drive useless 
when I was told to reconfig- 
ure it for PC Tools. While PC 
Tools' tape backup software 
decided to remove all traces 
of my original tape backup 



IBM PC or 
compatible (80386 
compatible), 4MB 
RAM, Windows 3,1 
or Windows tor 
Worl<groups, hard 
drive witli 5-1 4MB 
tree {depending on 
the number of 



m 



PCTaDliloeWndmi 



' File Edii Folder View Opifoiis ijclp 




D«ik(op: fX lEH^t 


T± 




%/' FAT Inlegr+lj^ Ot 
[.an Clv*i«rrt 


1 



FndtHoUtFiitO! 



■^ 



'<si-i. 



H dOflCtOV VXJKI. ClOlt-linkt. Afld (oil dklttet Ch*iiM 



C'tiitral Point 

►^Di-skFix 



I i;»^m ] I 



software, it couldn't figure out 
the proper IRQ and DMA set- 
tings for my CMS tape drive, 
and I'd left the original manu- 
al in storage during a move. 
Of course, I couldn't find 
CMS or Colorado Mount Sys- 
tems in the index when I went 
to look up the problem. 

Still, PC Tools for Windows 
gives you a really big bang for 
the buck. Like very few other 
Windows products, it manages 
to be both accessible to the 
beginner and deep enough for 
the power user. Like even few- 
er multipurpose products, it 
does a great job with every- 
thing it sets out to do— without 
getting in your way. O 

Circle Readef Service Number 391 

NOVEMBER 1993 



modules instaltedl, 
Mlcrosolt-Gompatible 
mouse— SI 79.95 



Central Point Software 
15220 KW Greenbrier 
Pliwy., Ste. 150 
Beaverton, OR 97006 
(800) 964-6896 



COMPUTE 103 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



William Harrel 



Do you need 

690-dpi resolution? 

It's ail a 

question of Image. 



RESOLUTION 

Just when you think an indus- 
try standard has been set, 
somebody moves the mark. 
A!l of the major manufacturers 
are championing low-cost 600- 
dpi printers. 

There's nothing new about 
600-dpi printers. High-end 
desktop publishers and graph- 
ics designers have used 600-, 
800-, and 1200-dpi devices 
for a few years now. Until re- 
cently, high-resolution printers 
have been too expensive for 
personal use. Today you can 
buy one, such as the HP Laser- 



ters with diagonal legs, such 
as M, V, and W, print with jag- 
gies (stairstepping). Small 
type can print with strokes 
(fine lines) broken up, or with 
circles (b, d. p) filled in. High- 
er resolution helps maintain 
fine lines and strol<e weights in 
small text, and large text print- 
ed at higher resolution has 
smooth, sharp edges. 

But where you'll really no- 
tice a difference is in graphi- 
cal and gray-scale (photo- 
graph) images. Some graph- 
ics contain tight arcs and an- 
gular lines that 300-dpi print- 
ers can't print without jaggies. 




Jet 4, for less than $1 ,500 (if 
you shop around). 

Why 600 dpi? Twice the res- 
olution means twice the quali- 
ty, right? Actually, 600-dpi res- 
olution is four times higher 
than 300-dpi resolution. 

In applications where the 
information is more important 
than the packaging, such as 
word processing and spread- 
sheets, 300 dpi is plenty of 
resolution. But newsletters, 
presentations, and sales pro- 
posals should look as slick as 
possible. This is especially 
true when you plan to repro- 
duce them on a copy machine 
or at the print shop, where 
some quality invariably gets 
lost in the process. 

Some 300-dpi printers don't 
handle large type well. 
Curved edges can print bro- 
ken and uneven, and charac- 

104 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Jaggies result from dots too 
large to fill in — or smooth out — 
tight areas. The tighter dots of 
600-dpi printers smooth out 
graphics much more effective- 
ly than the larger dots pro- 
duced by 300-dpi printers. 

Since laser printers simu- 
late shades of gray by alternat- 
ing black dots with white ar- 
eas, 600-dpi printers have a 
significant advantage over 
300-dpi printers. Photographs 
print more sharply at 600 dpi. 
You wind up with about four 
times the number of simulated 
shades of gray as on a 300- 
dpi machine. Printers with 300- 
dpi resolution are capable of on- 
ly 25 shades of gray; 600-dpi 
printers can simulate more 
than 100 shades of gray 

The 600-dpi printers also 
print tighter screens, or per- 
centages of black, in device- 



dependent graphics, such as 
those created by Corel- 
DRAW!, Micrografx Works, 
and other draw programs. 
Screens create shading and 
other gray fills, such as Corel's 
graduating linear and radial 
fountain fills. 

For many applications, 600- 
dpi resolution proves good 
enough for camera-ready art 
that is to be reproduced. 
Printers with 600-dpi resolu- 
tion also make better proof 
printers. However, when you 
need perfect text and graph- 
ics, you'll still need to run your 
documents on an imagesetter 
at the neighborhood service bu- 
reau. Toner — what the printer 
uses to print — is still toner; it 
cannot produce fine lines and 
grays as well as imagesetters, 
even though today's toner is 
much finer than that of just a 
few years ago. 

Not only do you get im- 
proved text and graphics 
from these new high-resolu- 
tion printers, but they also 
print faster. New RISC proces- 
sors and other innovations, 
such as improved parallel 
ports, halve the processing 
time. The Lexmark 4029's par- 
allel port, for example, can ac- 
cept two or three times more 
data per second than the 
ports of 300-dpi printers devel- 
oped a few years ago. Sever- 
al printers, such HP's LaserJet 
4, are built around Intel's 20- 
MHz 80960 RISC processor, 
which processes data at break- 
neck speeds and requires 
less printer RAM, making the 
printers less expensive to pro- 
duce and upgrade. 

Other innovations, such as 
windows accelerators, also 
turn in record printing times. 
These combination software- 
hardware solutions use your 
computer's memory, True- 
Type fonts, and souped-up 
printer drivers for speeds as 
much as ten times faster than 
those of printers that do not 
support such solutions. D 



With COnnPUTE's SharePak, You'll 



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Conquer Ihe enemy in Flux. 



Rtnorf 0.4 

You've seen morphing done in hit movies— now get ready to try this new 
technology at home. Rmorf takes two images and smoothly blends ihem 
into each other. Just load up two GIF or 24-bit TGA images, place a cor- 
responding grid over the images, and start the morphing process. Unlike 
other morphing programs, which can take several minutes to do a single 
frame, Rmorf morphs each frame in just a few seconds. Frames can be 
oulput as GIF or TGA files, and can also be made automatically into an 
FLI animation file. Rmorf requires VGA graphics and 938K of XfvlS. Regis- 
tration Is $25. 

Flux 1.1 

Challenge your computer opponent in one of the most addictive games 
you'll ever play in this new strategy board game for one player. Every 
time you land beside an enemy piece, it changes to your color and be- 
comes yours. Flux features many unique setups and has three difficulty 
levels. Flux requires VGA gfaphics and a mouse. Registfation is $15. 



COMPUTE'S SharePak disk contains the best 
of shareware — handpicked and tested by our staff — to 
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COMPUTES SuperShell requires DOS 3.0 or higher. 

Disks available oniy for IBIi/l PC and compatibles. Otier good while supplies last. 



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ART WORKS 



Robert Bixby 



Low-cost products aren't 

necessarily low- 

enil. Like PagePlus and 

GeoWorks, 1st 

Design provides 

inexpensive power. 



DEAD REPTILES: 

SOFTWARE 

EVOLUTION 

Are you as tired of dinosaurs 
as I am? If not, ctieck out Ju- 
rassic ART from Computer Sup- 
port (15926 fVlidway Road, Dal- 
las, Texas 75244-9982; 214- 
661-8960; $59.95). It's a spe- 
cial packaging of Scenerio (re- 
viewed in an earlier column). 
Computer Support has always 
been known for its clip art, and 
it's brought something new 
and interesting to the genre — 




a little flexibility. Jaws and 
limbs of certain pieces of dino- 
saur clip art can be ungroup- 
ed from the rest of the draw- 
ing and rotated to change the 
pose. Kids will love the draw- 
ings you create with Jurassic 
ART, if dinosaurs haven't 
gone the way of the pet rock 
and the Davy Crockett hat by 
the time you read this. 

Lizards have popped up in 
the chat areas online as well. 
Among the Rush Limbaugh dit- 
tohead clubs and invitations to 
twisted trysts, Barney (the kid- 
show dino) is appearing in the 
names of chat rooms such as 
Death to Barney. 

If you're looking for a GUI 
with a collection of useful 
apps like spreadsheet, data- 
base, and word processor, 
GeoWorks Ensemble 2.0 is 
out — and has been out for 



some time now. Unfortunately, 
the folks at GeoWorks (2150 
Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, 
California 94704; 510-644- 
0883; $79.95) wouldn't let me 
write about the product until it 
was on the market. 

GeoWrite, the program 
most directly applicable to 
this column, has a lot of new 
desktop publishing capabili- 
ties including master pages 
and frames. You can use all of 
the fonts you've been using 
with 1.2. The new GeoWrite 
automatically converts 1 .2 doc- 
uments to 2.0 format, but al- 
though you can export to sev- 
eral other for- 
mats (not just 
ASCII), you can't 
export to a Geo- 
Write 1 .2 format. 
GeoDraw is 
now packed 
with drawing 
utilities includ- 
ing curve edit- 
ing and more im- 
port filters. At 
their most ad- 
vanced level 
(all apps in 2.0 
feature four lev- 
els of operation), each of the 
major applications incorpo- 
rates GeoDraw, so you can 
use all of the drawing tools v/i!h- 
in GeoDraw and GeoWrite as 
well as within the spreadsheet 
and database. 

GeoWorks Ensemble 2.0 is 
a faster, friendlier, larger collec- 
tion of even more useful utili- 
ties and applications than ver- 
sion 1.2. Desktop publishers 
should consider it among oth- 
er low-cost desktop publish- 
ing options. GeoWorks seems 
to be more interested in third- 
party support this time around, 
having already run a "boot 
camp" for outside developers. 
I might as well admit that I 
love a bargain. GST, the de- 
veloper of Timeworks' line of 
desktop publishing programs, 
is going to introduce a Win- 
dows illustration and design 



program called 1st Design at 
the incredible price of $49.95. 

With 53 TrueType fonts, 1st 
Design features a simple au- 
lotrace, polygons and stars, 
gradient fills. Bezier curves, 
blends, and typographical ma- 
nipulation (like kerning, fitting 
to path, and spacing) worthy 
of a product several times its 
price. 

The 1st Design product 
does lack masking and hole- 
cutting features, however. 

The GST product was re- 
leased in the U.S. in Septem- 
ber, though it's been available 
in Britain for some time. GST 
can be reached at fvleadow 
Lane, St. Ives, Huntingdon, 
Cambridgeshire, England 
PE17 4LG; 011-44-480-496- 
789. As of this writing, GST 
doesn't have a U.S. address. 

A second GST program, 
1st Press, may also be intro- 
duced. It's a frame-based Win- 
dows desktop publishing pack- 
age reminiscent of Ventura 
Publisher. 

There's stiff competition at 
the low end of the price spec- 
trum from products like 
PagePlus (Serif, PO. Box 803. 
Nashua, New Hampshire; 800- 
697-3743), which is being com- 
pared with high-end desktop 
publishing programs like 
QuarkXPress but sells for only 
S59.95, A fonts package (with 
120 TrueType fonts) and a 
type manipulation package 
are available for $19.95 each. 

Have a DTP tip you'd like to 
share? Let me know about it 
by calling (900) 884-8681 , ex- 
tension 7010203 (sponsored 
by Pure Entertainment, P.O. 
Box 186, Hollywood, California 
90078). The call will cost 95 
cents per minute, you must be 
18 or older, and you must use 
a touch-tone phone. Or write 
to "Art Works" in care of this 
magazine. And if you don't 
have a tip, please let me know 
what you're publishing, what 
software you're using, and 
how "Artworks" can help. □ 



106 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




^ • 



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DISCOVERY CHOICE 



Encounter the strangest aliens ever seen 

in our solar system 

as you tracl< Carmen Sandiego. 

Clayton Walnum 



WHERE IN SPACE 
IS CARMEN 
SANDIEGO? 



The world's favorite villain, 
Carmen Sandiego, sure does 
get around. She began her 
lustrious career by hopping 
across the globe, committing 
new crimes wherever she set 
down her jet. Since then, not 
only has she victimized every 
corner of the earth, but she 
has also managed to find her 
way through time and Ameri- 
ca's past. Now, in Where in 
Space Is Carmen Sandiego?, 
her crime spree leads into the 
great expanse of the uni- 
verse, where a gang of das- 
tardly aliens joins her to terror- 
ize the solar system from the 
sun to lonely frozen Pluto. 

If you're familiar with the oth- 
er Carmen Sandiego games, 
you'll be able to slip into this 
new installment like a pair of 
favorite slippers. Although 
your crime stopper vehicle 
has metamorphosed into the 
Cosmohopper and the game 
controls have been rear- 
ranged, the basic gameplay 
is identical to that in the other 
games in the series. 

You begin by getting your 
assignment from the chief, a 
bizarre alien who looks like a 
cross between Jabba the Hut 
and a parakeet. Because the 
squeaking and squawking he 
passes off as language is in- 
comprehensible to human 
ears, your Cosmohopper's 
main screen displays the con- 
versation in English. 'When 
you get your first assignment, 
you learn that, as always. 
Carmen and her gang are 
snatching valuable artifacts. 
For example, the chief may 
tell you that the culprit has sto- 
len the Skynd crater from tJra- 

108 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




nus's moon Umbrie 
the Sacajawea from Ve 
nus, or Hermes's winged hat 
from fvlercury 

With your mission record- 
ed, you blast off to the place 
the Sandiego gang was last 
seen. To complete your mis- 
sion, you must search several 
of 32 locations for 1 of 15 sus- 
pects, Locations you'll visit in- 
clude not only the nine plan- 
ets but also the sun. aster- 
oids, Halley's comet, and 
many moons. The 15 aliens 
that make up your suspect 
list are as different from each 
other as a tomato is from an 
anteater. Sporting such pun- 
ny names as Astro Fizzix. 
Avery Littlebit Phelps, and Ha- 
nover Fist, these creatures 
represent some of the strang- 
est life forms ever seen in our 
solar system. 

Besides the villains, you 
have your on-board comput- 
er, VAL 9000, to keep you 
company. Using VAL, you 
can access an online data- 
base, dossiers on the various 
criminals, a travel log. and the 
game options. In addition, 
VAL sometimes uses her dig- 
itized voice to relay such sar- 
castic comments as "What do 



you think the little E 
stands for on your fuel 
gauge?" and "A rocket scien- 
tist you're not. You've eliminat- 
ed all suspects." 

Upon arrival at your new lo- 
cation, you gather clues by 
questioning witnesses, tap- 
ping into V.I.L.E. radio frequen- 
cies, or performing a star 
search for incoming messag- 
es from your colleagues. Wit- 
nesses and V.I.L.E. radio trans- 
missions immediately give 
you clues to your next destina- 
tion. When performing a star 
search, however, you must 
first use the star map to lock 
onto the constellation from 
which the transmission was 
sent. To find the constellation, 
you use the controls on your 
Cosmohopper to scroll the 
star map to the correct longi- 
tude and latitude, at which 
time the selected constella- 
tion spins to the right of the 
screen and displays its asso- 
ciated animated image (for ex- 
ample, a bull for Taurus). 

Poinding where the culprit 
has fled is only half of your bat- 
tle, though. You also need to 
learn the criminal's identity so 
you can get a warrant for his 
or her arrest. To do this, you 



contact an informant, who 
tells you about one of the crea- 
ture's seven characteristics: 
gender, number of eyes, fea- 
ture, locomotion, favorite writ- 
er, favorite astronomer, and 
favorite food. You might, for 
example, discover that the 
creature has no eyes, loves 
the writings of H. G. Wells, or 
snacks on space cadets. 

After deciphering the 
clues, you choose your next 
destination. To help narrow 
things down, the Cosmohop- 
per's display offers a menu of 
four locations, one of which is 
correct. Clicking on a location 
sends your Cosmohopper 
blasting into space. When 
you arrive, you're shown a dig- 
itized NASA photo of the loca- 
tion. If the location you picked 
!S correct, you enjoy a short, 
animated sequence of a 
V.I.L.E. henchman's outer- 
space antics. One animation 
features a one-celled creature 
that divides into two and, up- 
on seeing Its twin, flees In ter- 
ror. Another depicts a crea- 
ture covered with suction 
cups that gets stuck lo your 
screen. All told, there are 
about a dozen of these humor- 
ous sequences. 

After the V.I.L.E. henchman 
skedaddles, you begin the 
clue-gathering process again. 
Eventually, after several 
jumps to various locations In 
the solar system, you catch 
up with the criminal and 
make your arrest — assuming, 
of course, that you arrive in 
time, don't run out of fuel, and 
have the proper warrant. 

One thing that sets Where 
in Space apart from the other 
Carmen Sandlego games Is 
its huge online database. Al- 
though the game comes with 
Peterson First Guide to Astron- 
omy, you don't need It to 
play. All answers to the clues 



can be found in the online da- 
tabase, which Is accessed 
through your Cosmohopper's 
VAL 9000 computer. 

The database menu allows 
you to select any of 18 gener- 
al topics, including each of 
the planets; such topics as as- 
tronauts, astronomers, and ex- 
plorations; and a glossary of 
astronomical terms. When 
you select a general topic, a 
list of subheads appears, en- 
abling you to jump to a specif- 
ic topic of Interest with a click 
of the mouse. To find topics 
even more quickly, you can en- 
ter a word into the text entry ar- 
ea, and the computer will 
search the database for eve- 
ry occurrence of the word, af- 
ter which you can browse all 
the identified entries for the in- 
formation you need. 

Most entries in the data- 
base Include digitized graph- 
ics. As you browse through 
the database, you'll come 
across portraits of astronauts 
and astronomers, photos of 
planets and moons, cross sec- 
tions of celestial bodies, and 
images of satellites, just to 
name a few. Animation, too, is 
used to good effect In the da- 
tabase, from orbiting planets 
to the birth of the sun to an 
awe-inspiring flight over the 
surface of fvlars that was con- 
structed from actual photos 
taken by the Viking. 

In short, the astronomy da- 
tabase included with Where 
In Space Is worth, by Itself, 
the price of the entire pack- 
age. And It's very easy to 
use; you can access it with- 
out having to play the game 
simply by typing carmen val 
at the DOS prompt. Even af- 
ter you've grown tired of the 
game (if that's possible), the 
database Is sure to continue 
to fascinate. 

If Where In Space has a 



weak point, It's the same one 
found in previous games in 
the series; There just aren't 
enough animated sequences. 
Although the animation adds 
much to the game at the 
start, it doesn't take long be- 
fore the sequences start re- 
peating. 'Vou can stop an ani- 
mation at any time by clicking 
a mouse button, so you aren't 
forced to watch them again 
and again. But the game 



IBM PC or 
compatible (80386 
compatible), 64eK 
RAM, VGA, hard 
drive witti 8MB 
free; mouse 
recommended, 
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would be much Improved 
with enough animated se- 
quences to carry the player 
through a full game with mini- 
mal repetition. 

Still, Where in Space Is 
Carmen Sandlego? Is yet an- 
other wonderful entry Into an 
already long and successful 
line of educational computer 
games. Plus it's a fascinating 
romp through the solar sys- 
tem featuring awesome digit- 
ized photos from NASA's own 
files and a clever gang of oth- 
erworldly characters. You 
have to wonder, though; Now 
that Carmen has made It 
through America, Europe, the 
world, time, America's past, 
and space, where can she 
possibly go next? □ 

Circle Reader Service Number 392 



BB0DERBUND 

SOFTWARE 

P.O. Sox 6121 

Novato, CA 94948- 

6121 

(880) 521-6263 

(415) 382-4480 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 109 




SubLOGIC has car\-cd a utiic]ue 
market niche ns ihc sole publisher of 
aviation edutainment software. Our 
simulation technologies have been 
bringing fiiglit into the home since 
1977. 1^1 us in I reduce you to the 
TOTAL FiJGHT EXPERIENCE. 

Simulation features like high fidelit}' 
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visual guidance systems, locator and 
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structured flight nssigner give you an 
extremely rewarding flight 
experience. Our user friendly 
sofHt'are guides you from takcofT, 
through easy visual and radio 
cnroute navigation, to a successful 
landing a( your destination. 



Two separate sets, USA East and 
USA West, cover the eastern and 
western sections of the country. 
Together they give you comprehen- 
sive visual scenery coverage of the 
entire United Slates plus every 
paved public-access airport, nav-aid 
and instrument approach. A 
continuous How of cities, airports, 
rivers, highways and railroads (the 
entire national infrastructure) 
makes Hjing a breathtaking 
experience. Our colorful, 
comprehensive maps are a^ 
SubLOGIC trademark. 



USA (also for Great Britain Scenery 
Collection). All you have to do is 
specif)' a time frame and difficulty 
level, select a flight, and print a copy 
of your flight log. Spoken Air Traffic 
Control messages come alive nation- 
wide (with ATP or Air Force and 
optional SoundBlaster sound card). 



USA East and USA 
est are available for 
$69.95 each. 




Subl.OCIC - Dedicated to bringing 
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All SubLOGIC flight simulations, 
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USA integrates tliree products in one 
coordinated package; a strtictured 
flight assiginnent system, a 
comprehensive scciierj" 
management system and, of course, 
a nationwide scenerj" platform. 



USA's scenerj' management system 
provides instant inflight information 
about or relocation to any airport or 
nav-aid facility. Navigation aid 
symbols can be turned on an off as 
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approach arrows guide you do«'n to 
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The automatic flight assignment 
system designs structured flights for 



Our aviation dedication is demon- 
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No more "Oh, I tried it before and I 
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Introducing Flight Light, a simple yet 
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practice flight mode 
lakes it impossible 
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Pitch/power 
visual cues 
show vou M"liat 



settings to use to climb, cruise, 
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horizon. Visual track-io-destination 
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Our devotion to 
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iSoH- York City at Uusk 



Midway Airport and Map View 

ight Assignment: ATP 

The renowTied complete jet airliner 
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fv. 



vi":jj( jij, 



«/" 



ATP's proprietary Air Traffic 
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version of USA EastAV'est. This 
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to new places for many years to 
come! 




VOR and IIS .Ya»-/lirf Stmbols 



All products available for IBM/ 
compatibles. See your dealer, 
or feel free to call our friendly 
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Flight Assfgnment, Flight V^t, and Scenery 
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system patent pending. All other produrls and 
brands are Irademarlui or registered 
irademarics of their respective outliers. 

Ihe Camputor Flight psopla 



®, 



5M[o)lJOGIC 



TELEPHONE: (217)359-8482 
FAX: (217)362-1472 

ORDER LINE: {800)637-4983 

Circle Reader Service Number 179 




GAME INSIDER 



Shay Addams 



LucasArts' Day of 

the Tentacle 

is selling eitually 

well on 

CO-ROM and floppy. 



112 COMPUTE 



SPECTRUMPROSE 
HOLOMICROBYTE? 

When Sierra asked Jim Walls 
to do another Police Quest, he 
turned in his badge and did 
Blue Force for Tsunami in- 
stead. The game turned out 
even better than some of his 
Police Quest work, and a se- 
quel is underway. Sierra 
turned to another law enforce- 
ment veteran, former Los An- 
geles police chief Daryl 
Gates, to codesign Police 
Quest IV. And it made the lat- 
est cop-on-the-beat adven- 
ture a cross-media event by 
bringing in "America's Most 
Wanted" producer Tammy Dar- 
gan to produce the game, 
which Sierra says creates a 
"whole new category of gam- 
ing: reality role-playing," 

In a story set in contempo- 
rary Los Angeles, you play de- 
tective John Carey, out to find 
a killer who has "worked the 
media and public into a fren- 
zy" Nowadays, Sierra is mak- 
ing an effort to differentiate its 
adventures, and the twist is 
technological in this latest Po- 
lice Quest— it marks the first 
use of Kodak's DCS 200Ci dig- 
ital camera in creating a com- 
puter game. Gates took the de- 
sign team on location with the 
camera in downtown L.A. to 
shoot many of the color back- 
ground scenes. Due out this 
month for MS-DOS, the game 
is also scheduled for CD-ROM 
and the Mac- (Rumors that the 
Gates-designed gamis in- 
cludes a video camera are un- 
founded. Or at least there 
wasn't one in my package.) 

In the fantasy realm, Sierra 
has transformed its TSN (The 
Sierra Network) multiplayer 
game Shadow of Yserbius in- 
to a single-player quest for 
PCs. The boxed edition in- 
cludes a new chapter in the 
Yserbius saga and other new 
features. In November, look 
for Inca 2 and Goblins 3 (both 

NOVEMBER 1993 



created by Coktei Vision) and 
Quest for Glory IV: Shadov/s of 
Darkness from Sierra. 

New engine, new world. In- 
stead of just bringing out yet 
another Magic Candle game 
with a new software engine un- 
der the hood, designer All At- 
abek let the Candle series go 
out with the third installment. 
Atabek did develop an all-new 
engine, but he harnessed it to 
drive a fresh fantasy world 
and story line for Mindcraft's lat- 
est role-playing series, The Grif- 
fon Masters. The first install- 
ment is already out. And if you 
miss playing the original Mag- 
ic Candle games, try The 
Bloodstone, which employs 
the same engine. 

A first in the realm of "utiii- 
tainment" software, Walt Dis- 
ney licensed some of its char- 
acters to Berkeley Systems, 
which does the After Dark 
screen saver. The new screen 
saver features animations 
from 101 Dalmatians, Beauty 
and the Beast, Mickey Mouse 
shorts, and other cartoon clas- 
sics. Disney reportedly 
worked closely with Berkeley 
on the product and plans 
more such iicenses and more 
coproducing in the future. Al- 
ready out for the Macintosh, 
the screen saver should be 
shipping for Windows by now. 

Sequel time. Origin's Wing 
Commander Academy lets 
you design new missions and 
trade them with friends or play 
new randomly generated mis- 
sions. It's a stand-alone 
game, so you don't need the 
original program, But don't 
look for another Wing Com- 
mander for a while. Wing Com- 
mander III isn't slated for re- 
lease until late 1994. But at 
least the construction set 
doesn't signal the end of the 
series, like it did with SSI's 
Unlimited Adventures construc- 
tion set for Gold Box games. 
Origin is using the Strike Com- 
mander technology in upcom- 
ing titles such as Privateer, a 



trading and combat game 
which takes place in the 
depths of outer space, and Pa- 
cific Strike, which re-creates 
World War II dogfight action. 

LucasArts' new variety 
pack. Classic Air Combat 
Sims, contains Battlehawks 
1942, Their Finest Hour, and 
Secret Weapons of the Luftwaf- 
fe, along with all the Tour of Du- 
ty disks, Adjustments were 
made so the joysticl< routines 
and other aspects of the older 
programs function well on a 
486. B-Wing is LucasArts' sec- 
ond mission disk for X-Wing. It 
introduces a new craft to fly, 
as well as the fifth Tour of Du- 
ty Spectrum HoloByte's MiG- 
29 is the slickest and most sub- 
stantial mission disk of the 
year, letting you take the other 
side in the Falcon 3.0 war. 

Will CD-ROM games really 
sell? LucasArts simultaneous- 
ly released Day of the Tenta- 
cle on floppy and CD-ROM. A 
major distributor reported the 
versions selling about equal- 
ly — a good sign for the newer 
format. Other new CD-ROMs 
to look for this fall are Electron- 
ic Arts' Labyrinth (originally de- 
signed for CDTV) and Br0der- 
bund's The Myst. both CD- 
ROM-only adventure-style 
games. Other recent CD-ROM 
releases worth looking for in- 
clude l-Motion's Shadow of 
the Comet (mixing action and 
adventure) and Alone in the 
Dark II (adventure in a Gothic 
horror setting), as well as Lu- 
casArts' action-arcade game 
Rebel Empire (the company's 
first CD-ROM-only title). 

The hot news as this was be- 
ing written was Spectrum Holo- 
Byte's acquisition of Micro- 
Prose, a deal that pumped 
$10 million into the latter com- 
pany. MicroProse's balance 
sheet, it's rumored, was inspi- 
ration for the title of Legacy: 
Realm of Terror, which was re- 
leased phor to the deal. The 
plan is for both companies to 
operate independently, □ 



'T^_i^jf'. -■::■: :■' ■-■"; ' _■;";>■ -■■":.'^. ' .''-'.'-':."''_ .■' , ie=f^iV^-.^jAi.V"w;/'^i?5Sr^r*.' 



The war against the Kilrathi rages on. 

To SOME, it means death, slavery or dishonor... 

To others, it's the chance to make a quick buck. 

• Make your own alliances and choose the life of a pirate, merchant or mercenary. 
You accept your assignments from the Mission Computers, Mercenary's Guild, 
Merchant's Gill Id or the nefarious fixers that inhabit every bar. 

• Customize your ship according to your needs and budget - you can modify 
weapons. armor and other systems. You'll need them since your enemies want 
more than just a new fill stenciled on their prow - they also want your cargo» 

• Upgrade your ship, from your grandfather's old Tarsus scout to the sleek 
Centurion fighter or Orion gunship ■ combat plays a vital role no matter how you 
decide to earn a living. 

• Explore a complete universe with more than 50 bases and planets in almost 70 
systems - agricultural bases, merchant colonies and mining planets. 

Privateer - where deals are made with a handshake 

AND BROKEN BY A VOLLEY FR0M*A MeSON CANNON. 




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P.O. BOX 161750 AUSTIN, TX 78716 



Pnvaleef is a uademark of ORIGIN Sislenis. inc. Wing ConimanCer. Oagtn. 5no VV* create wotlds arc (egislerwl Uflflemait.s Qi ORIGIN S>stems. inc. 
CopjTigM C 1993 ORIGIN Systems. Inc. Electronic Ans « a t^gistereO traOema* of Becxiorjx Arts. ForJEM PC ana 1Q0» compaiibie systems. 



Circle Reader Service Number 246 



ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 




Surge into the future, where you fight to regain 

the throne of the ancient Incan peopie in this stunning 

blend of foli<lore and science fiction. 

Scott A. May 



INCA 

Adrift in time and space, you 
awaken to fulfill a destiny writ- 
ten more tfian 500 years ago: 
savior to the lost Incan civiliza- 
tion. So begins one of tfie 
year's most audacious and 
original games — an action-ad- 
venture born of a rich past, 
set in the unknown future. 

Imported from French soft- 
ware developer Coktel Vision, 
Inca showcases the rising tal- 
ent of designer Pierre Gilfio- 
des, who gave Sierra's 
Gobliiins its distinctive 
punch. Gilhodes's latest com- 
bines many disparate styles 
and gaming genres, strung to- 
gether with a thoroughly out- 
of-kiiter story line. What in the- 
ory should never work unfolds 
with singular grace and 
clicks in our imaginations. 

To fully appreciate Inca, you 
must immerse yourself in its un- 
usual background, based 
equally in fact and fable, The 
story begins in 1525. as an ag- 
ing Incan ruler named Huayna 
Capac foretells the fall of the 
great Tawantinsuya empire. 
He predicts floods, earth- 
quakes, and the arrival of 
"bearded savages" — Spanish 
marauders lured by tales of 
"the gilded one," El Dorado. 
According to legend. El Dora- 
do was an Incan chief who 
would cover himself in gold 
dust for ritual celebrations. As 
a sacrifice to the god of nobili- 
ty, he'd wash off the gold in 
the waters of Lake Titicaca. 
Followers would also toss gold 
into the lake to appease the 
sun god. 

In 1532, Spanish conquista- 
dors, led by Francisco Pizar- 
ro, waged battle on the 
mighty Incan warriors. 
Though the Spaniards were 
outrageously outnumbered, 
the Incan army, weakened by 



years of civil war, was soon de- 
feated. Pizarro's men, howev- 
er, found little gold. As Capac 
says, "The real treasure — In- 
ca knowledge — will never be 
found." 

From this beginning, Inca 
blasts 500 years into the fu- 
ture, aboard the lost city Paiti- 
ti, which is adrift in space. 
You're approached by the spir- 
it of Huayna Capac, who wel- 
comes your return as El Dora- 
do. Your mission is to restore 
brilliance to the Incan sun by 
recovering the three missing 
jewels of Time, fvlatter, and En- 
ergy. To succeed, you must 
win the help of various spiritu- 
al protectors and defeat the 
powers of Aguirre, an evil 
force symbolic of the greedy, 
savage conquistadors. 

Your journey unfolds along 
a linear path that's divided in- 
to three phases, one per jew- 
el, of increasingly diverse and 
difficult quests. The game of- 
fers a satisfying mix of arcade 
and mental challenges, rang- 
ing from 3-D space combat 
and first-person shootouts to 
mind-bending graphic and log- 
ic puzzles. You must confront 
and overcome obstacles in a 
prescribed order. White un- 
solved puzzles merely stall 



your quest, failed arcade seg- 
nnients result in loss of life. In- 
stead of traditional game 
saves, randomly generated 
pass codes allow you to re- 
start the game at various mile- 
stones in your journey. 

The cursor-driven graphic in- 
terface functions in two 
modes: cockpit and ground 
views. Behind the controls of 
your Tumi fighter, the cursor 
serves as both weapons 
crosshairs and navigational de- 
vice. Some of the action you'll 
encounter includes asteroid 
belts, Star Wars-style trench 
combat, and deep-space dog- 
fights. Your toughest (and 
most unusual) galactic battle 
kicks off the game's final 
phase, as you square off 
against authentic Spanish gal- 
leons. These huge, three- 
masted ships firing comet- 
sized cannonballs are as un- 
settling as they are deadly. 

Ground exploration fea- 
tures a simitar windowed dis- 
play, with a visual inventory 
and limited online advice 
from Huayna Capac. Besides 
fighting, you also pick up and 
manipulate objects, which are 
key to solving the game's se- 
ries of visual puzzles. Correct 
moves trigger dazzling audio 



114 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



and visual rewards, enticing 
you to press on, Other ele- 
ments of play include multiple 
3-D mazes and realtime duels 
to the death with Aguirre's 
space-age warriors, fought 
with plasma bolts instead of 
swords, These otherwise sim- 
ple slugfests are heightened 
considerably with outstanding 
full-motion digitized video and 
sizzling sound effects. 

The game's graphics are 
extraordinary — an opinion ech- 
oed at the 1992 Paris Super- 
games Show, where the title 
won honors for best graphics. 
Much of the game's visual ap- 
peal stems from its superb 
use of color as well as its 
sheer variety of graphic 
styles, from Gouraud-textured 
3-D polygons to finely de- 
tailed scanned bitmap art- 
worl<. Complementing the ani- 
mated actors is a full range of 
crisp, digitized speech, 
much of it delivered in the au- 
thentic Quechuan tongue. For 
those unfamiliar with this ar- 
cane culture, the main menu 
offers an online glossary of 
terms used throughout the 
game. Other sampled sound 
effects Include goose bump- 
inducing footsteps and slam- 
ming doors as well as the at- 
mospheric groans and creaks 
of the wooden galleons rock- 
ing in space. 

Dynamic on disk, the 
game Is absolutely stunning 




CD-ROM version of Inca 



on CD-ROM, offering en- 
hanced cinematic segues 
full character voices, and ste- 
reo soundtrack, Inca's CD- 
ROM audio is unlike that in 
any other CD-ROM game on 
the market. It uses true CD au- 
dio, not just the computer's 
sound card, and the result is 
absolutely Incredible, 

Gilles Douieb supplies 14 
pieces — over 40 minutes — of 
original New Age-style music, 
performed with authentic In- 
can woodwinds and percus- 
sion. Also included Is the 
song. "Inca People," written 
and performed by J, M. Mar- 
rier, A minor hit on European 
radio, the song adds flair to 
the CD-ROM version's extend- 
ed graphic intro. An audio in- 
terface, built into the main 
menu, allows instant access 
to any of the CD-ROM's mu- 
sic tracks. There's even an on- 
screen antara (bamboo pan- 
pipe) for those inclined to 
play along, available in both 
versions. Overall, Sierra's mul- 
timedia treatment transforms 
an uncommonly good game in- 
to a true work of art. 

Despite the game's unusu- 
ally rich graphics and sound, 
the game makes surprisingly 
minor hardware demands, run- 
ning equally well on both low- 
end (80386/20 minimum) and 
high-end (80486/66) systems. 
The biggest price paid is 
hard drive space, which rang- 
es from 1 6MB for the disk ver- 
sion to 33MB for the CD-ROM 
version. One nice touch: Sier- 
ra's CD-ROM installation 
offers four configuration choic- 
es, allowing you to transfer 
100, 70, 25 or percent of 
the game to hard disk. 
Because of the game's seg- 
mented story structure and 
effective memory usage, 
most users with reasonably 
fast CO-ROM drives (250- to 



350-ms access time) can get 
by with minimal hard drive 
installation. 

As with most bright gems, 
this one has a few minor 
flaws. One of the most annoy- 
ing is simply the speed at 
which onscreen text — usually 
important clues or dialogue- 
appears and quickly vanish- 
es. Given the game's eccen- 
tric nature and enigmatic 
prose, this loss of information 
can easily lead to confusion. 
The designers should've giv- 
en players control of text flow 



IBM PC or 
compatible (20- 
iVIHz 80386 or 
(aster), 640K RAIVI, 
256-color VGA, 
tiard drive with 
18IV1B tree, mouse; 
joysUGl< optional, 
supports Sound 
Blaster, Ad Lib, 
Thunder Board, Pro 




or at least provided a way to 
pause the display. Also disap- 
pointing is the poorly imple- 
mented joystick routine, an ar- 
cade setback softened only 
by the game's well-designed 
mouse controls. Finally, once 
solved, the game provides lit- 
tle replay value. A possible so- 
lution would be to scramble 
some puzzles or to increase 
the difficulty level of the ar- 
cade sequences. 

Inca's surrealistic blend of 
ancient folklore and science 
fiction will throw many players 
off guard, 'But those looking 
for a wholly original, multifari- 
ous challenge will delight in 
this fantastic journey of sight, 
sound, and imagination. □ 

circle Reader Service Number 393 



AudioSpectrum, 
and compatible 
sound cards— 
$59.95 (disk), 
$69.95 (CD-ROM) 

SIERRA ON-LIKE 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold, i:a 
93614 
I80O] 326-6654 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 115 



GAMEPLAY 



Paul C. Schuytema 



Become a Wild 

West pharmacist in 

Al Lowe and 

Josh Mandel's latest 

zany world. 



116 COMPUTE 



ROMP ON THE 
WILD SIDE 

First, grind up a portion of 
Bimthylquinotine crystals: 
tlien add just a toucli of Metyra- 
phosptiate. Dispense as a pow- 
der, and presto! Birtin control 
for the radical woman of the 
1880s. Tlnis and other exciting 
recipes can be yours to con- 
coct in Freddy Pharkas, Fron- 
tier Pharmacist, the latest ad- 
venture fronn the twisted 
minds of Al Lowe and Josh 
Mandel. 

Freddy Pharkas is the first 
truly fresh idea for an adven- 
ture game that I've seen for 
quite some time. The game 
takes place in Coarsegold, Cal- 
ifornia, in 1888 — just a few 
years after the gold rush. Our 
hero, Freddy, is not a gunsling- 
er (although he once was); 
he's a pharmacist who also 
runs a soda fountain on the 
side. 

I spoke with designer Al 
Lowe about the game, and I 
was particularly interested in 
how he came up with the idea 
of Wild West pharmacology. It 
seems that the team at Sierra 
On-Line had already commit- 
ted to doing a comedy West- 
ern game, since it was a hith- 
erto untapped niche in the 
adventure market. Lowe, 
along with Mandel (the adven- 
ture's producer and writer} 
and Roberta Williams (of Lau- 
ra Bow fame) were sitting 
around, brainstorming, look- 
ing for a central character. 
Lowe somehow got his 
tongue twisted as he attempt- 
ed to say "farmer" and "ranch- 
er" at the same time, and "phar- 
macist" came out. Within min- 
utes, the three of them were 
laughing so hard that they 
were rolling on the floor. The 
idea of a frontier pharmacist 
was one of those ingenious mis- 
takes, and it was perfect. 

Freddy is a Dudley Do- 
Right sort of guy He has a di- 

NOVEMBER 1993 



ploma and is struggling to 
keep his village from beconn- 
ing just another ghost town. 

A few things really stand 
out in this adventure. First is 
the feeling of a true environ- 
ment: Coarsegold seems to 
be living and breathing even 
when Freddy isn't there. The 
town is a side-scrolling work of 
art. It was first created as a six- 
foot-long painting, and then it 
was digitized into the comput- 
er. (The original is now hang- 
ing at the Sierra offices in mod- 
ern-day Coarsegold.) 

Beyond just looking gor- 
geous, the town is a closed sys- 
tem that allows Freddy to wan- 
der, explore, and interact with 
the characters in a very con- 
vincing way 

The game's puzzles are al- 
so outstanding. Face it: Any 
good adventure game is sim- 
ply a good story braided with 
a series of player-solvable puz- 
zles. But all too often, the ouz- 
zles fit a routine formula or are 
so obtuse that people in their 
right minds can't begin to 
solve them. 

In Freddy Pharkas, the puz- 
zles are difficult yet solvable, 
and there's more player involve- 
ment. But what makes them 
so interesting is that each one 
is unique and crazy: they real- 
ly stretched my creative-prob- 
lem-solving acumen. Freddy 
must analyze, mix, build, and 
perform all sorts of gyrations 
as he moves from puzzle to 
puzzle, making players work 
very hard for rewards. 

I've deliberately avoided talk- 
ing about the game as a com- 
edy because, for me. game- 
play is the foundation upon 
which everything else Is built. 
Freddy Pharkas, though, is a 
comedy, first and foremost. 
Lowe saw it as an opportunity 
to pay homage to the rather 
seedy genre of the Western 
film, and he took nearly every 
cliche he could find and 
warped it to fit this zany world. 

Some characters, like Fred- 



dy's faithful Indian sidekick, 
Srini Bagdnish (the animist 
from India), play with the ster- 
eotypes. Other gags pay hom- 
age to certain movies: take, 
for instance, the scene be- 
tween Srini and Freddy, 
which is reminiscent of the 
scene In Cat Ballou in which 
Jane Fonda helps Lee Marvin 
dress for a gunfight. 

Lowe worked long and 
hard on the story line for Fred- 
dy Pharkas, attempting to cre- 
ate the richest and most believ- 
able tale possible for his 
sense of humor. He even took 
a workshop in plot and story de- 
velopment from Roger McKee 
to help with his story. Then he 
turned to Mandel for his mag- 
ic pen. Mandel wrote the text 
of the gags and dialogue, and 
he created a wonderfully ab- 
surd handbook. The Modern- 
Day Book of Health and Hy- 
giene: 1381 Edition, which 
comes with the game. 

When I asked Lowe what dif- 
ficulties he encountered when 
working on Freddy Pharkas, 
he was silent for a moment. 
Then he shrugged (over the 
phone) and said, "Actually, 
I'm getting pretty good at 
this," You'll agree with him 
when you play the game. 

He's very appreciative to all 
those who've helped him cre- 
ate the game, especially Clint 
Eastwood, whose movie Unfor- 
given is one of Lowe's favor- 
ites. And Lowe says that he cer- 
tainly appreciates Clint's win- 
ning an Oscar just to promote 
Freddy Pharkas. 

Freddy Pharkas breaks 
new ground and refines 
Lowe's comic storytelling abil- 
ity. But most important. It's ex- 
tremely challenging and enter- 
taining. Like any good B West- 
ern that comes with a tub of 
popcorn, Freddy Pharkas, Fron- 
tier Pharmacist is well worth 
the price of admission. In- 
deed, taking a romp on the 
range with this Wild West phar- 
macist is time well spent. D 



mm^mffMm^m^^m^^^fimM- 




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CYBERRflCE - R REVOIUTIONRRY 3D COMBRT RND RRCING SlMULRTION DESIGNED fTtUtl 
SYD mead, IJLIHDSE DESIGN CREDITS INCLUDE BLRDE RUNNER. WON. 5010. 9NQ 5TRR TREK: Ttfi 



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Circle Reader Service Number144 



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^CfuithErlnlDrniatlDniptease conlaci: North FtmBrica ISI8) 34B-37II • Eurapa 10711 338-3557 tU.K.l 
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n a darkened office, sur- 
rounded by The Eagles' 
Greatest Hits from the CD 
player, Bruce Carver, presi- 
dent of Access Software, 
does trees. He spends as 
much time on trees as he 
can, without totally ignoring 
other minor duties such as 
determining the direction of 
the company, deciding 
whether to license its prod- 
ucts to Microsoft, and tend- 
ing to other pesky details. 
No one digitizes images as 
well as Bruce Carver. And 
few probably enjoy it as 
much, either. 

We're thankful for his tal- 
ent and dedication. The 
results, seen in Access 
Software's series of add-on 
golf courses for the compa- 
ny's line of golf games, are 
best-selling, ultrarealistic 
renditions of famous cours- 
es around the world. Banff 



that feels like the 

real thing Is all work — 

and all play. 



Springs, a recent release, is 
on the software bestseller 
lists at press time. By the 
time you read this. Tarpon 
Springs, a Florida course, 
will probably be the latest 
success. 

Anyone with a PC and 
an interest in golf — and cer- 
tainly any faithful COM- 
PUTE reader— knows about 
Links 386 Pro and its junior 
partners. Links and 
Microsoft Golf (Links for 
Windows). These games 
perennially win the Software 
Publishers' Association's 
Best of the Year Awards, 
COMPUTE Choice Awards. 
and countless other prizes. 
The games' success lies in 
the seamless marriage of 
an unmatched golf game 
engine with actual golf 
courses lovingly and metic- 
ulously digitized to provide 
an almost real sense of the 



course as you play. 

All three games use the 
same course disks, but the 
courses are most spectacu- 
lar in Links 386 Pro's 256- 
color Super VGA mode. 
That game's basic interface 
provides all the information 
you could possibly want, 
from scrollable, zoomable 
aerial views and reverse 
views from the green to an 
incredible array of statistics 
on your play. Balls behave 
precisely as they would on a 
real course, rolling down 
hills, bouncing off paved 
golf cart paths, and careen- 
ing wildly if you should be 
unfortunate enough to hit a 
ball washer. We don't know 
what happens when you hit 
an alligator with a hard two- 
iron shot, but we'll find out 
as soon as the Tarpon 
Springs course ships. (The 
alligator will be on the 



course in the exact spot it 
was the day the design 
team shot the video used to 
create the course disks.) 

It's Magic 

As important as the game's 
basic play engine is, the golf 
courses themselves provide 
ever-fresh excitement to the 
game. The stunning beauty 
and realism of these cours- 
es never cease to amaze 
us, even now that we know 
how they're created. Access 
routinely receives calls and 
letters from golfers who 
have played the actual 
courses and are astonished 
at how much the computer 
version simulates reality. 

These courses duplicate 
the real thing, down to the 
placement of each tree and 
bush, ball washer, bench, 
boulder, and yes, even alli- 
gator. These are magical 



By Richard O. Mann 

and 

Ramona R. Mann 

Illustration by 
Richard Hawks 






«-1c 



r^'» 



r.f 




%^ 




worlds that are so like 
reality that it's easy for 
you to totally lose 
yourself. 

What's even more 
amazing is that Ac- 
cess pumps out these 
enchant-ing courses 
every few months. 
How can Ac-cess pro- 
duce such realistic 
courses so quickly? 
How can it convert 
miles qI verdant ter- 
rain into such an 
accurate computer 
simulation? We spent 
a day with the mem- 
bers of the Links de- 
sign team at Access 
in Salt Lake City to 
find out what sort of magic they use 
to accomplish these seemingly 
impossible tasks. 

The Magicians Take the Stage 

It ail starts with course selection. The 
folks on the Links course design team 
are avid golfers who study golfing 
books and magazines when they're 
not actually out on the links. They 
watch for famous courses with out- 
standing features, such as pic- 
turesque settings or particularly inter- 




BflNFF SPRINGS 

aEfRULT 

Hoti>: 5 Par: 5 ShDtf: 

Bull to Pin: ti yp. 



Henut 



|Score»f|Dropj 



In Banff Springs, where the deer and the antelope play, realism is the 
effect Access programmers strive for. 

esting or challenging hole layouts. 

Once the team obtains the rights to 
use a course, it swings into action. 
John Berven. who shoulders the over- 
all responsibility for the project, and 
Zeke McCabe, a professional photog- 
rapher, travel to the site and play a 
round to familiarize themselves with 
the course. If it doesn't rain, the next 
few days are spent taking videos and 
still photos of the course. "Golf course 
managers call us whenever things get 
too dry — it always rams for four days 



when we show up," 
says Berven. 

The Show Begins 

Berven straps on a 
battery pack and a 
special video camera 
and then walks the 
entire course with the 
tape running. He walks 
down the middle of 
each fairway, pausing 
Irequently to make a 
360-degree turn for the 
tape. He also makes 
sure he gets a thor- 
ough set of shots of 
any special objects 
noted during the previ- 
ous round of golf. 
Unusual trees or 
shrubbery, buildings near the course, 
animals, boulders, and so forth — all of 
these need to be specially shot. 

fvleanwhile. McCabe takes still 
photos of trees and other objects. 
Trees, we learned, make or break the 
visual portrayal of a golf course. 
IvlcCabe works diligently to identify 
50-60 trees that exemplify all the 
generic trees on the course. He also 
shoots all the smail identifying fea- 
tures of the course, such as the flags 
on the flagsticks, so that every detail 



UNI^ 386 PRO 

"PC Game of the year" 



— GAiviE Player Magazine 



"READER'S CHOICE AWARD" 



-Multimedia World 



"Golden Triad Award" 



— Computer Gaivie Review 



"Compute's Choice Award" 



— Compute 



"BEST Graphics Award" 



IF YOU donT have Links 386 Pro yet, you owe it to yourself to put this magazine down 

RIGHT now and GO OUT AND BUY TT AT YOUR LOCAL SOFTWARE RETAILER! 



will show up in the game. 

Finding and shooting all the 
objects can be a challenge. It was at 
Tarpon Spnngs that McCabe decided 
to photograph a six-foot alligator that 
was sunning itself just off the fairway, 
As Berven tells it. McCabe nervously 
crept closer and closer to the gator, 
snapping shot after shot. Finally, 
about ten feet from the gator, he was 
satisfied that he had enough good 
shots, He relaxed and turned to walk 
back to the golf cart. As he did, the 
gator slipped back into the swamp 
with a loud smack of its tail on the 
water. "Zeke jumped ten feet when he 
heard that. He thought the gator was 
after him," says Berven, chortling. 

The next day, McCabe strapped 
himself into a rented helicopter so that 
he could hang out the door and take 
35-mm photos with his fast-winding 
Nikon F-4. The chopper flew down 
each fairway sideways, with the door 
McCabe was hanging from tilted to let 
him shoot the photos directly down, 
without any obstructions, When devel- 
oped, these stills were taped together 
to give a four-foot strip photo of the 
hole from above. 

The pair also obtains a topographi- 
cal map of the course. If none is readi- 
ly available, they have professionals 
create one. 



Creating Illusions 

Back in Salt Lake City, digitizing 
begins in earnest. Technicians scan 
the topographical map into a special 
course architecture program dev- 
eloped for this purpose. It reads the 
information into a course database, 
capturing essential information about 
every square foot of the course's 
terrain: elevation, nature (fairway, 
green, rough, sand), slope, and so 
forth. 

From there the course goes to the 
smoothers, a half-dozen experts who 
compare the computer's rendition of 
the course from the topographical 
map with the videotape and aerial 
photos. Using the architecture pro- 
gram, they can do virtually anything 
to the terrain, from smoothing the 
curves of the edge of the fairway to 
creating hills or holes anywhere. 
Primarily, they convert the somewhat 
roughly mapped information into 
smoothly flowing terrain that matches 
the image on the videotape. Splitting 
up the course among the staff of 
smoothers makes ft possible for them 
to finish this painstaking, inch-by- 
inch work in five or six weeks. At the 
conclusion of smoothing, Berven pol- 
ishes the transition between holes, 
making sure everything matches up 
seamlessly. 



The Magic Is in the Art 

While the smoothing is in process, 
some other things are happening, 
McCabe's shots of trees and objects 
go to the best Kodak Photo CD lab he 
can find; there they're converted to 
CD-based images With those CDs In 
hand, Bruce Carver starts his month's 
work of perfecting each image. 

Photos, of course, have an unlimit- 
ed range of colors. To convert them 
for SVGA, Carver has to refine each 
image to a palette of only 256 colors. 
Building the palette that gives the 
best results is the key to Carver's 
arcane art. He is meticulous, v/orking 
pixel by pixel till the images approach 
perfection. 

Outside the president's office, the 
word is that courses are often held up 
for weeks while Carver refines that last 
pixel. In his office. Carver says with a 
gentle grin, "I have to hustle to keep 
from holding things up." 

Planting the Illusions 

Once Carver is satisfied, the object 
files go to Berven, who "plants" the 
trees and other objects. With the 
object files at the ready, Berven works 
with his overhead photo strip to pre- 
cisely place each tree and other object 
in its proper place on the terrain. He 
can place a tree within one square fool 



SOUD GOLD 



"SPA Award" 

Best Sports 
Program 1993 

— SOFTWARE Publishers Association 

'The best golf game 
on the planet!" 

— PC HOME JOURNAL 

"#1 SELLING 
ENTERTAINMENT 

PRODUCT IN America/' 

— PC RESEARCH (OCT.'92) 



IF YOU CAN'T FIND LINKS 386 PRO NEAR YOU, CALL , 
t -800-800-4880 FOR QUESTIONS OR ORDERING . 

circle Reader Service Number 169 







SOFTWARE INCORPORATED 

4910 W^ Amelia Earltart Dr., SLC, UT 84116 



of its actual location and plot terrain 
within two inches of its actual eleva- 
tion. He places each unusual tree and 
object in its appropriate square foot, 
then works with the representative 
generic trees and shrubs, sizing them 
according to the videotape's image 
and planting them where the overhead 
photos show them. 

After completing this process, 
Berven plays the computer course, 
comparing each hole to the videotape 
as he goes, "Even though we've 
placed each tree, sand trap, and 
other feature in exactly the fight place, 
sometimes they simply don't feel hght. 
In real life, things occasionally look 
different than they really are, so we 
have to tweak things to achieve the 
real look and feel, even though it 
results in a tree being slightly out of 
place or a hill being higher than it real- 
ly is," he says. 

Then the course goes into inten- 
sive play testing, Many minor prob- 
lems show up at this stage, mostly in 
the smaller details. The team contin- 
ues to refine the course until Berven 
is satisfied that the course seems 
exactly the same as the course he's 
played and videotaped. Around 2- 
1/2 months have passed from play- 
ing the opening round to sending the 



product to manufacturing. 

The course design and production 
teams have this process down to a 
science. They've created a dozen 
courses so far and routinely produce 
new ones approximately every two 
months. As they work, however, they 
cofTie up with new refinements in the 
technology. In fact, almost every 
course has shipped with a new ver- 
sion of the core game program with 
minor changes, adding features need- 
ed for the new course, 

A Real Fantosy Course 

Perhaps you've seen calendars or 
posters featuring the most difficult golf 
holes in the world. One pictures the 
green on a tiny ledge halfway down 
the cliff at Niagara Falls; others are 
similarly outrageous. The Access golf 
geniuses couldn't resist the challenge 
to create their own fantasy course. 

But Links courses are real, based 
on actual terrain. They must allow 
you to actually play the course. For 
a setting for his make-believe 
course, Berven went to the U,S, 
Geological Survey map repository to 
search for the ideal topography. He 
selected an area near Kings Peak in 
the rugged High Uinta mountain 
range in Utah. 



The course is well under way; we 
saw fairways in the bottoms of 
canyons, tees on cliffs, and greens a 
hundred feet above the fairway. This 
is going to be a wild golf course— but 
rest assured, it's almost real. If you 
could get the land rights, you could 
build this course up there in those 
rugged mountains. 

The fantasy course will be released 
as part of a promotional tie-in with 
Access's upcoming state-of-the-art 
interactive movie game, Under a 
Killing Moon, a two-CD thriller due in 
the first quarter of 1994. 

Devotion and Passion Make the Magic 

You don't often encounter executives 
spending their time digitizing trees in 
darkened rooms. Bruce Carver's pas- 
sion for his work is evident, as he 
eagerly explains the intricacies of 
trees, 256-color palettes, and search- 
ing for the best Photo CD lab. Here is 
a man who pushes the limits of tech- 
nology and human effort in order to 
achieve the highest quality possible. 
The result is a seamless, magical illu- 
sion which so closely simulates reality 
that you have to rennind yourself 
you're sitting in a chair at your house 
and not in some faraway place chip- 
ping away out on the links. "3 




V^ 



|UJ 0^>-M 



SPEAK UP! 

Is there a feature topic 

you'd like to see covered 

In COMPUTE? Let us 

know by calling 
(900) 884-8681, exten- 
sion 7010101. The call 
will cost 95 cents per 
minute, you must be 18 or 
older, and you must use 
a touch-tone phone. 
Sponsored by Pure 
Entertainment, 
P.O. Box 186, Hollywood, 
California 90078. 



122 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



64/128 VIEW 



Here are a couple of new products 
from two companies that still have faith in 
the Commodore market. 

Tom Netsel 



Peter Fiset, the man be- 
tiind Performance Pe- 
ripherals, makes a num- 
ber of great products 
for tfie 64 and 128, Cfieck 
out any CMD advertisement 
and you're sure to notice 
RAMLInk and RAMDrive, 
just two of hiis creations, 

GEOS and REU users are 
probably familiar witti two of 
Fiset's otiier Commodore pe- 
ripherals: BBGRAM and 
BBU. BBGRAM is a battery- 
backed RAM for GEOS 2.0 
tfiat is a fast alternative to me- 
chanical drives. BBU is a bat- 
tery backup cartridge for 
the 64 or 128 that provides 
permanent memory (nonvola- 
tile) for Commodore RAM 
expansion units. 

Many companies have 
dropped Commodore prod- 
ucts from their inventory but 
Fiset keeps making new 
ones. Continuing with his al- 
phabetical nances, Fiset 
now offers BBRTC, a new 
and novel realtime clock. 

While he doesn't say so, I 
assume BBRTC means bat- 
tery-backed realtime clock. 
In any event, this module 
plugs into the unused joys- 
tick port for non-GEOS appli- 
cations. Software that 
comes with the module exe- 
cutes automatically whenev- 
er GEOS is booted. This 
sets the GEOS time and 
date. Users can program 
BBRTC to any date and 
time, and leap years are cal- 
culated automatically. 

BBRTC works with or with- 
out an RFU, and it can be 
used with GEOS 1.3 and 
up, including GEOS 128 
2.0. !t comes with a number 
of utilities that are written in 
BASIC. BBRTC sells for 
S19.95 plus $3.00 shipping 
and handling to U.S. destina- 
tions, $4.00 for those in Cana- 



da, and $6.00 elsewhere. 
For more information or to or- 
der, contact Performance Pe- 
ripherals, 5 Upper Loudon 
Road, Loudonville, New 
York 12211; (518)436-0485. 
To place an order from the 
U.S., call (800) 925-9774, 

In other news. Mad Man 
Software has started to ship 
its Compression Kit. This is 
a disk and file backup sys- 
tem that features fast data 
compression for the 64. 

According to Gene Bark- 
er, the Mad Man himself, 
Compression Kit works with 
all Commodore computers 
and drives. Designed for the 
64, the kit works with both 
North American NTSC and 
European PAL versions, It's 
also configured to work with 
JiffyDOS, all of the CMD 
hard drives and floppy 
drives, RAMLink, and 
RAMDrive. This menu-driven 
utility lets you copy, move, 
and delete standard files, as 
well as copy and compress 
partitions and entire disks. 

For a number of years. 
Mad Man has been working 
on its muitidisk adventure 
game, Messiah III. Compres- 
sion Kit grew out of the com- 
pany's need to provide a re- 
liable backup and verify util- 
ity that worked with all of the 
staff computers and drives. 
As it turned out, this utility 
worked so well that Barker 
decided to market it. Com- 
pression Kit sounds like a 
great utility for power users 
or sysops who run a multi- 
drive BBS. 

Compression Kit retails 
for $39.95. It can be or- 
dered from Mad Man Soft- 
ware, 1400 East College 
Drive, Cheyenne, Wyoming 
82007 or by calling (800) 34- 
M AD MAN. For more informa- 
tion call (307) 632-1178. 3 



GAZETTE 

64/128 VIEW 

Support for the 64 continues. 
By Tom Netsel. 


G-I 


THE SOUNDS OF SID 

Programming the SID chip. 
By Larry Cotton, 


G-2 


REVIEWS 

FD-Series Drive and Simple Sounds. 


G-8 


FEEDBACK 

Questions, answers, and comments. 


G-12 


PD PICKS 

Super Rockfall and Zix. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


G-14 


BEGINNER BASIC 

Retrieving data from disk. 
By Larry Cotton. 


G-16 


MACHINE LANGUAGE 

Watch this line crawl across your screen at ML 
By Jim Butterfield, 


G-18 

speed. 


PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 

A reader helps solve printer problems. 
By Randy Thompson. 


G-20 


GEOS 

A GEOS user's guide to GEnie. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


G-22 


DIVERSIONS 

Are schools ready for our children? 
By Fred D'Ignazio. 


G-24 


PROGRAMS 

Super Screen Fonts (128) 

Script Fix (128) 

Double Size (128) 

VerlrScroll (64) 

Easy Does It (64) 

RAWI-D (64) 

How to Type In Gazette Programs (64/128) 


G-25 
G-30 
G-30 
G-31 
G-35 
G-38 
G-40 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE 



*fef 



X ■■,i-=:'rr* 



' ?-..vvV.-.-vt' £-S^-'?^-- 



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-^'^^•^'•^"^^"■"'^''^" 



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"nrmwiwiTh 



The Sound Interface device has three 
voices that enable your 64 or 1 28 to play 

music, initate musical instruments, 

talk, and make sounds. Here's how to tap 

into that power. 

THE SOUNDS OF 




f you've used your 64 for any length 
of time, you probably know what 
- great sound capabilities it has. Each 
64 has three voices, or tone oscillators, 
and each of these voices has four 
waveforms: triangle, sawtooth, pulse, 
and noise. All three voices must share 
the same volume control, but each 
voice can produce sound independently 
of the others. The Sound Interface 
Device, an integrated circuit chip known 
as SID, resides inside both (he 64 and 
128 computers. It has the ability to iet 
your computer play music, imitate musi- 
cal instruments, talk, and make any 
number of sounds to accompany 
games. To produce a single sound on 
the SID chip, it's necessary to issue a 
few commands in a precise order. SID 
occupies memory registers 54272 
through 54300 in the 64, To produce 
sounds, we poke different values to 



several of these registers. Here's a re- 
view of the order in which you must 
issue commands to cause SID to pro- 
duce a sound. 

1. Clear the chip 

2. Turn up the volume 

3. Wait 

4. Set a frequency 

5. Set an envelope 

6. Turn on a waveform 

Of course, this procedure plays only a 
single note on one SID voice. By 
changing frequencies, you can play a 
simple melody. Many songs for the 64, 
however, include a melody, a harmonic 
line, and some percussion. This 
requires that all three SID voices be 
programmed more or less inde- 
pendently. Beautifully elaborate songs 
are usually programmed in machine 



By Larry Cotton 



language, but simpler tunes 
can easily be programmed in 
BASIC. Before we go any 
further, however, we must 
understand the concept of 
bit manipulation. 



Pol<e these 
Numbers — 



Figure 1 

6 5 4 3 2 



128 64 



32 



16 



■ Bit No. 



Attack 



Bit Manipulation 

The 64 and 128 are both 8-bit 
computers. That means that 
each of their myriad of memo- 
ry registers holds one byte, or 
eight individually controllable 
bits. When you turn on or turn 
off a voice, you're actually 
gating and degating a memo- 
ry register. To gate a voice- 
control memory register, you 
simply change one bit — the 
first one — in that register. See 
figure 1 for a representation of 
one particular register, 54276, 
which is the control register 
for voice 1 . 

In figure 1, the 
rightmost bit— bit 
0— must be set, or 
changed, from a 
to a 1 to make the 
voice speak, Do 
this by poking a 1 
to the memory 
register 54276. 

However, in ad- 
dition to setting 
the bit, you must 

also select one of the four waveforms. 
This requires setting another bit to l. 
As you can see in figure 1 , each of the 
four leftmost bits (4 through 7) repre- 
sents a waveform. 

To select a waveform, pulse, for ex- 
ample, you set bit 6 to a 1. Bit 6 is con- 
trolled by poking a 64. Add 1 to gate the 
register and then poke the result to that 
register. Thus, a poke of 65 to 54276 
turns on voice 1's pulse waveform. Poke 
33 to turn on or gate the sawrtooth wave- 
formi, 17 to turn on the triangle wave- 
form, and 1 29 to turn on noise. 

The pulse wave is unique. To hear 
it, you must poke some value to at 
least one of its two pulse-width reg- 
isters. For each voice, there are 
coarse and fine pulse-width registers. 

For now, we'll just poke 8 to the 
coarse pulse-width registers 54279 
and 54286 for voices 1 and 2, respec- 
tively. The other waveforms don't 
need this poke. 

OK, the voice is on. There are sev- 
eral ways to make the voice shut up. 
The easiest way is to make bit a 
again. We've seen that if waveform 65 
gates the register to make it play, pok- 
ing a 64 degates or turns it off. Like- 
wise, poking a 129 turns on the noise 

waveform, while 128 turns it off. 

There are at least three other ways to 

G-4 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



Noise 
Pulse 
Sawtooth • 
Triangle ■ 



! 



1 

L Gate Bit 
— For Later 




Figure 2 

Decay 



Sustain 



Release 



\Gate 



De-Gate 



54277 






f'S"*"^ 3 54278 




7 5 5 4 3 


2 


1 


Bit 7 6 5 4 3 


2 1 


128 64 


32 16 


8 


4 


2 


1 


. ^- / 128 


64 


32 


16 


8 


4 


2 


1 


Attack 


Decay 


X/ Sustain 


Release 








Poke these 










Numbers 





silence a voice. You can change the 
voice's envelope to a shorter sustain 
and/or decay value; you can poke a 
to the voice's frequency registers; or 
you can poke a to 54296, the master 
volume control. 

Here's a snippet of a program 
featuring two sustained voices, 



accompanied by percus- 
sion, that demonstrates 
some of the techniques just 
described. Take a look at 
the Three Voices listing and 
follow the line-by-line expla- 
nation that follows. 

Line 10 defines S as the 
first of SID's 29 memory 
registers. It then clears the 
chip by poking all the regis- 
ters with 0. Lines 20 and 30 
turn up the volume and ini- 
tiate a short pause. 

In lines 40 and 50, attack 
and decay for voice 3 (the 
drum) are set differently 
from attack and decay for 
voices 1 and 2 (melody and 
harmony). Likewise, sustain 
and release are set different- 
ly in lines 60 and 70. Line 80 
sets up the puise wave width 
for the first two 
voices. 

We read data 
for the melodic 
frequencies in 
line 100, while 
the drum's fre- 
quency remains 
constant at 50 
(line 90). In lines 
110 and 120, we 
poke both fine 
and coarse fre- 
quencies to the register. 

Now let's use bit manipulation to 
turn on voices 1 and 2 with a pulse 
wave. We set bits 6 and 1 by poking a 
65 (64 + 1 ) to 54276 (S-h4) and 54283 
(S+11) in line 130. While the notes 
play, a FOR-NEXT loop in lines 
140-180 plays four drumbeats. Line 



Three 

ED 10 S=54272jFORJ=STOS+24:POK 
EJ,0:NSXT:REM CLEAR SID 
[SPACE}CHIP 
DP 20 P0KES+24,1S:REM VOLUME A 

LL 3 VOICES 
AJ 30 FORT=1TO500:NEXT!REM WAI 

T 
JF 40 POKES+5,12:POKES+12,12:R 
EM ATTACK AKD DECAY VOIC 
ES 1 AND 2 
FA 50 P0KES+19,2:REM AD DRUM 
BM 60 POKES+6,4:POKES+13,4:REM 
SUSTAIN AND RELEASE VOI 
CBS 1 AND 2 
XK 70 POKES+20,15:REH SR DRUM 
QS 80 POKES+3,8:POKES+10,8:REM 
SET UP PULSE WAVE AS SQ 
OARB WAVE VOICES 1 AND 2 
HA 90 POKES+15,50;REH COARSE F 
REQ VOICE 3 (DRUM) — FINE 
FREQ, NOT NECESSARY 
FP 100 READA1,A2,B1,B2: REM REA 
D FREQUENCIES FOR VOICE 
S 1 (Al, A2) AND 2 {Bl, 
B2) 
GK 110 IFA1=0THENEND 



Voices 


SE 


120 


XD 


130 


PH 


140 


BG 


150 


EQ 


160 


CG 


170 


HS 


180 


GR 


190 


FD 


200 


MD 


210 


XD 


220 



POKES+l,Al:P0KES+8,Bl:R 
EM COARSE FREQUENCIES V 
DICES 1 AND 2 
POKES, A2: PC KES + 7,B2.: REM 
FINE FREQUENCIES VOICE 
S 1 AND 2 

POKES+4,65:POKES+ll,65: 
REM TURN ON VOICES 1 AN 
D 2 (PULSE WAVE) 
FORZ-1T04:REM NO. OF OR 
UM BEATS 

P0KES+18,129:REM TORS 
N VOICE 3 (DRUM) 
PORT-1TO200; NEXT: REM LE 
NGTH OF DRUM BEAT 
P0KES+18,128:REM TURN 
FF VOICE 3 
NEXT 

P0KES+4,64:P0KES+11,64; 
REM TURN OFF VOICES 1 A 
ND 2 
GOTO90 

DATA16, 195,21,31, 15,210 
,25,30,14,24,16,195,0,0 
,0,0 




'^^ GRAPEVINE GROUP INC 

NORTH AMERICA'S LARGEST SUPPLIER OF AMIGA CUSTOM CHIPS AND SPECIALTY PARTS • 



I ' '' '• 



COMMODORE FACTORY SURPLUS 

M'^ecently, Commodore elected to consolidate their stateside operations, thus making them 
.M. IL financially stronger. One of the first steps taken was to reduce their inventory in both the U.S. and 
Canada. In doing this, select distributors were given the opportunity to purchase sizable amounts of new 
and factory refurbished parts at extraordinarily low prices. This section contains new and refurbished 
items, which are indicated by the letters "N"or "R"lo the left of each product. Refurbished does not mean 
used or pre-owned, but simply factory remanufactured. Some units may have minor imperfections such 
as scratches or, in the case of some monitors, faulty front doors. With the exception of a minor 
imperfection, if any, most everything appears "mint" and of course everything carries a full 90 day 
warranty. This is your opportunity to purchase Amiga/Commodore parts and equipment at up to 80% 
less than an authorized dealer pays. 





MONITORS 

R 1 084S composite/ RGB high resolution 

color monitor with cables, This is the 

latest composite video/RGB monitor 

Commodore manulactu red....S129.95 
R 1802 composite video high resolution 

color monitor with cables. Production 

monitor prior to 1084 series. Works 

on 64/128 series and Amiga Also 

an excellent VCR or Toaster 

monitor $99.95 

R 1702 composite video color monitor with cables £34.50 

R 1403 composite high resolution monochrome video with cable $65.00 

R 1930 Bisync high resolution VGA color monitor. This companion to 

Commodore's PC series works with IBM/IBM compatibles $99.95 

R 1950 14" multisync high resolution VGA color monitor wiSh aulomatic 

scanning. Works wilh A60O/1200/3OO0/4000 and IBM/I8M compatibles 

(Predecessor to the 1942) $249.95 

R A520 RF modulator. Allows you to connect an Amiga (A500/2000/3000] to a 

TV or composite video monitor. The A520 Converts the RGB video signai into 

composile color video $22.50 

R A2300 Genlock Board (A2000/3000) $64.50 

COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

N Amiga 500 with power supply and 

software (late revision) $169.95 

With STARTER PACK Software add.ilO.OO 
N Commodore C64C wilh power supply 

(latest design and revision) $89.95 

R Commodore C64 with power 

supply $69,95 

N Commodore 065 This is a new C64 just released in Europe with a built in 3'A" 

(loppy drive on the (ront (PAL or NTSCj $95.50 

R PCIOIII(XT) No hard drive $149.95 

fi PC20lll{XT)20meg hard drive $169.00 

R PCSOIK tAT-286) 20 meg hard drive $229.00 

R PC40III IAT-286) 40 meg hard drive $299.95 

ADDITIONAL OPTIONS 
Amiga 1930 VGA Bisync color monitor with any o1 the "PC Series" computer 

add S79.95 

Commodore 10B4S with any "PC Series " computer add $89.95 

SPECIAL PRICE PACKAGES 

BONUS PACKAGE A; 

Commodore C64 with 1541 lloppy drive and 10843 (stereo) high resolution 
color monitor. Includes power supply and cables $229.95 

BONUS PACKAGE B: 
Commodore C64C (latest version made) with 1571 high density floppy drive 
and 1084S color monitor. Includes power supply and cables $299.95 

BONUS PACKAGE C: 
Amiga A5Q0 computer wilh Software Starter Kit and 1084S (stereo) high 
resolution color monitor. Includes power supply and cables (List phce of 
package S449.00) Our price $284.95 

MISCELLANEOUS 

N A10 Commodore computer speakers wilh built in amplifier SI 9.95 

N MPS1230 Commodore printer (same as Citizen 120) tractor/lriction ...$59.95 

R A2300 Genlock Board (A2000/A3000) $64.50 

N Amiga 8375 Agnus CKip (390544-01 UK/Europe PAI type) $24.95 

N 2'A (SSOK) Commodore diskette with various software that can be erased. This 
is a new disk available at a low price- 
Package of 10... .S3.80 Package of 50 $18.00 

N Just Released 2.1 Series Diskettes (same software as 2.1 kit) 

2.1 install disk S3.95 2.1 fonts disk $3.95 

2.1 locale disk S3.9S 2.1 extra disk $3.95 

•NOT A COMMODORE PRODUCT 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



MOTHERBOARDS 

N ASOO (rev. 3) Complete with all chips including Vs meg Agnus S89.95 

N ASOO (revision 5 and up) Includes 8372 1 meg Agnus & 1.3 ROM $129.95 

R A2000 Includes 8372A Agnus & new 2.04 Operating ROM (great for tower 

.5299. 



lits).. 



95 



^ tiliitrtrf ji^rMr '»iWtrii vUti 



R A3000 (various revisions) , CALL 

N MPS 803 printer motherboard S1B.50 

N VGA 286 laptop motherboard $179.95 

N 1571 control motherboard $54.95 

R C64 motherboard (1984-5 version) $29.95 

N C12B motherboard (with new ROMs) $99.00 

N C128D motherboard (with new ROMs) $1H».00 

N C64C motherboard (revision E) $54.50 

N PC40 III motherboard $140.00 

N PC30/40/60I1I CALL 

N 1750/64 RAfVI expansion board $19.50 

N Slingshot Pro:* Gives A2000 slot lor your A500. New design with passlhrough. 
Now take advantage of all A2000 plug In boards $42.50 

KEYBOARDS 

N A500 (American version) S27.50 

R ASOO (UK. version) $22.00 

N A600/1200 $29.50 mmmmimimiiimimimitmiiiiimimmmm 

R A1000 $54.50 N C64 $17.95 

N A2000 S49.S0 R C1280 .....$25.95 

R A3000 549.95 N PC Series $49.95 

N Encoder Board (Mitsumi) (A50O/2000) $19.00 

POWER SUPPLIES 

N ASOO (110V) $29.95 

R A500 (240V U.K. a Europe) $24.50 

N A500 Big Foot' (A50Q/ 600/ 1200) $79.95 

N A2000 (1 10/220V) $89.95 

N A2000 Big Foot" (300 watts} S135.00 

N A3000 $84.95 

R A3000(220V| S79.95 

N C64 (sealed/nonrepairable) 1.5 amp $9.95 

N C64 (repairable)* 1.8 amp $24.95 

N C64 4.3 amp heavy duty (also used with 1750 RAM expander) 529.95 

N C1541 11/1581 (external) Limited quantity. Going fast $19.95 

220 Volt version available for $27.50 

N C12eD (internal) $12.95 

N C128 external 4.3 amp $29.95 

N PC20 (75 watt) $83.5 

N 1680 power supply for A1200RS modem $11.95 

DRIVES 

N ASOO internal 880 K drive: Exact drop-in replacement .$59.95 

R A590 hard drive (20 megs) with controller & power supply $169.95 

Wilh extra 2 megs installed add $74.00 

R A1010 Amiga external S'/i" (loppy (predecessor to AT011) $49.95 

R A1011 Amiga external 3Vi" lloppy $54.95 

N A2000 high density drive (1.76 megs] $91.50 

R A2000 internal drive $79.95 

U 2a90A hard drive controller (no memory) $17.95 

N 2091 hard drive controller (new ROMs) $64.50 

R A3070 150 meg tape backup (complete) $229.95 

R 1541 complete floppy drive with cable $64.95 

R 1541 replacement control board only $30.00 

N A1541-II complete stand alone floppy drive $90.50 

N 1571 complete standalone lloppy drive (Selling out fast) $119.95 

N A1571 replacement control board only $55,00 

N IBM/Commodore bridgeboard lloppy (5y</1.2 megs) $25.50 

N Printer Port Adapter.* Interface any Commodore printer to work any PC/PC 

clone $29.95 

N CD ROM drive assembly for CDTV (complete) $129.95 

Dealers: Send us your letterhead and we mil send you our Fall '93 dealer prices. 



Order Line Only 

1-800-292-7445 



3 Chestnut Street. Suffern, New Yofk 1 0901 • Fax: (914) 357-6243 

Order Status/Customer Service Line; (914) 368-4242 / (914) 357-2607 
International Order Line: (91 4) 357-2424 9-6 E.T. MON.-FRI. 



SEND SASE FOR FULL LISTING OF ALL COMMODORE/AWtlGA SURPLUS PRODUCTS 





Figure 4 


Attack 


Decay 


(no bits) shortest 


(no bits) shortest 


16 (bit 4) 


1 (bit 0) 


32 (bit 5) 


2(bit 1) 


48 (bits 4 and 5) 


3 (bits and 1) 


64 (bit 6) 


4 (bit 2) 


80 (bits 4 and 6) 


5 (bits and 2) 


96 (bits 5 and 6) 


6 (bits 1 and 2) 


112(bits4, 5, and6) 


7 (bits 0, Land 2) 


128 (bit 7) 


8 (bit 3) 


144 (bits 4 and 7) 


9 (bits and 3) 


160 (bits 5 and 7) 


10 (bits 1 and 3) 


I76(bits4. 5, and7) 


11 (bitsO. Land 3) 


192 (bits 6 and 7) 


12 (bits 2 and 3) 


208(bits4. 6, and7) 


13 (bits 0. 2. and 3) 


224(bits5, 6. and7) 


14 (bits 1. 2. and 3) 


240 (bits 4. 5, 6, and 7) longest 


15 (bits 0, 1. 2, and 3) longest 



150 turns on tine noise waveform— tlie 
drumbeat— by poking a 129 (128 + 1) 
to voice 3's control register: line 170 
degates it. Line 180 ends the drum- 
beat's FOR-NEXT loop. 

Line 190 degates voices 1 and 2 
by resetting bit to 0, and then line 
200 sends control back to read more 
note frequencies. 

More on Envelopes 

A note's envelope can be described 
as the way its volume changes while it 
plays, Figure 2 shows how a typical 
envelope could look. 

The rate of rise in volume at the left 
of the curve is called the attack, which 
starts as soon as the voice is gated. 
This volume usually rises to a relative- 
ly high level and then drops back. 
This part of the sound's lifetime, called 
decay, is the rate that the volume of 
the sound diminishes from this highest 
level to the sustained level. Sustain is 
the flat portion of the sound curve. 

Finally comes the release portion. 
Release starts when the voice control 
register is degated and is the right- 
most portion of the curve. 

Timing also influences the repre- 
sentative shape of an envelope. 
Remember, we used FOR-NEXT loops 
to create pauses while the notes and 
drumbeats sounded. 

Each voice uses two memory 
registers to control its envelope, which 
is often referred to as the ADSR enve- 
lope. The first register controls attack 
and decay, and the second controls 
sustain and release. 

How do you know what to poke into 
the envelope registers? I've found that 
the most effective way to set up an 
envelope is by trial and error, listening 
to the sound. However, it hefps to 
know how the envelope is affected by 
the setting of each bit. Figure 3 repre- 
sents the memory registers for attack 
and decay (54277) and sustain and 

G-6 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



release (54278) for voice 1 . 

Figure 4 is a chart which can help 
you decide what to poke to the 
attack/decay register. The upper four 
bits, 4-7. control attack, while the 
lower four, 0-3, control decay. Attack 
can be gradually lengthened by pok- 



ing the values shown in increments of 
16. Poking 240 sets all four bits, 4-7, 
for the longest attack time. 

Changing decay gradually, howev- 
er, is a bit easier. Just poke 1-15 for in- 
creasingly longer decay times. Sustain 
and release are controlled in register 
54278 for voice 1. Bits 4-7 control sus- 
tain, while 0-3 control release. 

Of the four parts of an envelope, 
sustain is the only one that is a volume 
level, as opposed to a rate of volume 
change, Therefore, you must set a 
sustain level before the release can 
be heard. 

Enough theory. Check out the short 
program called Envelopes that should 
end your quest for the perfect enve- 
lope. As you hear the sounds, watch 
the values change to shov/ what to 
poke where to achieve that sound. 
This is for voice 1 only. For voice 2, 
add 7 to the memory registers; for 
voice 3, add 14. As mentioned, voice 
1 occupies registers 54272-54278, 
voice 2 occupies 54279-54285, and 
voice 3 resides in 54286-54292. 3 



Envelopes 



AM 
CC 

RR 
CG 
EF 

KA 

SG 

SG 
JB 
EK 

HQ 

JJ 
AG 
PD 

KB 



PE 



BE 
FX 



BE 
GK 
EM 



10 PRINTCHR5{147) 

20 POKE650,12B:REM REPEAT A 

m KEY 
30 F1S=CHR$(133) :F2$=CHRS(1 
37) •.F3$=CHR$ (134) :F4S=CH 
R5(138) 
40 F5$=CHHS{135) :F65»CHRS (1 
39) :F7S=CHR$ (136) ;FeS=CH 
RS{].40) 
50 SID=54272:FORJ=SIDTOSID+ 
23:POKEJ,0:NEXT:REM CLEA 
R SID 
60 P0KESID+24,15:REH FULL V 

OLUHE 
70 Vl=6:V'2|Vl+l;REM INITIA 

L VOICE 
80 D=5:REM INTIAL DECftY 
90 P=30:REM INITIAL PITCH 
IBO POKESIDt3,8:REM PUL.SE W 

IDTH 
110 PRINT"(HOMEl (DOWN) P = 

{SPACE} RANDOM PITCH 
120 PRINT" V = CHANCE VOICE 
130 PRINT" ANY KEY = REPEAT 
140 PRINT" SPACE BAR = QEGI 

N RELEASE 
150 PRINT"{DOWN) ATTACK TIM 

E =(3 SPACES)Fl/F2":PRI 

NT" DECAY TIME 

(2 SPACES}=(3 SPACES}F3 

/F4" 
160 PRINT" SUSTAIN LEVEL = 

(SPACE}F5/F6":PRINT" RE 

LEASE TIME "(2 SPACES}F 

7/F8 
170 GETAS:IFAS=""THEN170 
180 IFA$*CHR$(32)THENPOKESI 

D+4,V-1;GOTO110!REH SIL 

ENCE SOUND 
190 IFAS="V"THENV1-V1+1:IFV 

l=8THENVl-4 
200 IFAS=F1STHENA=R+1:IFA>1 

5THENA=15 
210 IFA$=F25THENA=A-1:IFA<0 

THENA=0 



PR 


220 


CR 


230 


JB 


240 


AF 


250 


MC 


260 


HA 


270 


HK 


280 


RS 


290 


BK 


300 


PJ 


310 


CB 


320 


EG 


330 


AA 


340 


BC 


350 


XD 


360 


AA 


370 


GF 


380 


QB 


390 


PD 


400 


XD 


410 


XH 


420 


XO 


430 



IFA5=F3$THEND=D+1:IFD>1 

5THEND=15 

IFA$=F4STHEND=D-1:IFD<0 

THEND=0 

IFAS=F59THENS=S+1:IFS>1 

5THENS=15 

IFA5=F6$THENS=S-1:IFS<0 

THENS=0 

IFAS=F75TH£HR=R+1:IFR>1 

5THENR"15 

IFA$=F8STHeNR'R-l:IFR<0 

THENR-0 

PRINT" (DOWN) ATTACK 

{4 SPACES)DECAY 

{5 SPACEsisUSTAIN 

{3 SPACES}RELEASE 

PRINT "{ DOWN) "A*16" 

{LEFT} {UP}", 

PRI NT" {DOWN} "D"{ LEFT) 

{UP}", 

PRINT"{D0WN)"S*16" 

(LEFT} CUP)", 

PRINT"{DOWN}"R"{LEFT} " 

PRINT" {DOWN} POKE 54277 

,"A*16+D"{LEFT} " 

PRINT" {DOWN} POKE 54278 

,"S*16+R"{LEFT} " 

POKESID+5,A*16+D!REM AT 

TACK/DECAY 

POKESID+6,S*16+R:REM SU 

STAIN/RELEASE 

P0KESID+4,V-1:REM SILEK 

CE SOUND 

IFA9="P"THENP=INT(40*RN 

D(1))+5;REM RANDOM COAR 

SE PITCH 

PRINT" {DOWN} POKE 54273 

,"P"{LEFT} " 

P0KESID+1,P:REH COARSE 

{SPACE}PITCH 

V-2]V1+1:P0KESID+4,V:RE 

M BEGIN SOUND 

PRINT"{DOWN) POKE 54276 

,"V"{LEFTJ " 

GOTO110 



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FD-SERIES DRIVE 

It sits there, kind of dark and 
mystenous, atop my stack 
of innocent-looking Commo- 
dore disk drives. There's no 
other drive like an FD drive — 
not for the Commodore, 
surely, or even for my fancy 
PC in the other room. Com- 
bined with Creative fvlicro De- 
signs' exquisite operating 
system, JiffyDOS. the FD de- 
livers an unprecedented lev- 
el of power and perform- 
ance for your 64 or 128. 

The most obvious feature 
of the FD is its storage ca- 
pacity. There are two mod- 
els from which to choose. 
The FD-2000 offers 1.6f\/IB 
of storage on a high-density 
disk and 800K on a stan- 
dard SYs-inch floppy. The 
FD-4000 offers the same as 
the FD-2000, but it'll let you 
store 3.2MB on an extended- 
density disk. Both drives in- 
clude a utilities disk and 
come with JiffyDOS. 

That's a lot of room, even 
for GEOS power users like 
me, who accumulate fonts 
and clip art like dust balls un- 
der the bed. No matter what 
you spend your computer 
time doing, from games to 
telecommunicating to desk- 
top publishing, you'll find 
plenty of space to do it on 
the FD, 

Without a way to organize 
and operate that space, how- 
ever, it'd be close to use- 
less. That's where JiffyDOS 
comes in. CIVID's experi- 
ence with its hard drives 
and RAf\/ILink comes shin- 
ing through with the FD. It 
knows, for example, that 
many Commodore pro- 
grams require a drive which 
is 100-percent compatible 
with the 1541, 

CMD also knows that Com- 
modore's built-in DOS, de- 
signed to fit the cozy world 
of 5y4-inch disks, would be 
helpless in the wide-open 

G-8 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



spaces of a high-density 
3y2-incher. JiffyDOS, on the 
other hand, has grown with 
the technology, from start- 
ing out as a system for mak- 
ing your Commodore drives 
a little smarter and a whole 
lot easier to use to manag- 
ing hard drives and multiple 
megs of RAM with the fi- 
nesse of a seasoned pro. 

The key to handling 
space for JiffyDOS is parti- 
tioning, breaking up the meg- 
abytes into smaller sections. 
The FD drive, like other 
Cf^D power peripherals, 
comes with a disk of utilities 
to make this a snap. 

You don't have to split 
things up if you don't want 
to. If you want the thrill of see- 
ing 12,736 blocks free 
when you list your directory 
you can create one big na- 
tive mode partition. 

But, as I said, a lot of pro- 
grams get ornery if they 
don't find everything laid out 
exactly like a 1541, Drop 
one of these programs into 
a native mode partition, and 
it would lock up faster than 
the local bank at five 
o'clock. On top of that, it's 
just plain easier to find your 
way around in smaller spac- 
es, where you don't wait for 
a directory listing to scroll 
by like a freight train at rush 
hour. This is where smaller 
partitions, either native 
mode or those emulating 
standard drives, are perfect. 

You can, for example, cre- 
ate a 1581 -size partition of 
3200 blocks for download- 
ing files from QuantumLink. 
You might create another 
1581-size partition to run 
GEOS under the deskTop, 
since the deskTop can only 
recognize a partition that 
acts like a regular drive. You 
can also create a partition 
that emulates a 1541 or 
1571, right down to the 
track and sector layout— but 
you'll notice that it's certain- 



ly faster than a 1541 drive. 

The FD also beats the 
1581 hands down, as I 
learned from a friend who bor- 
rowed the FD to run his BBS 
for a few days. He usually us- 
es four 1581 drives. Even run- 
ning simply as a 1581, read- 
ing a standard 1581 -format 
disk, the FD easily outpaces 
the other drives on his sys- 
tem running identical tasks. 
Then, after configuring the 
drive as a large native parti- 
tion, he let the FD take over 
his upload/download chores. 
When he realized just how 
much space that gave him, 
he suggested that I leave the 
unit with him for a few more 
months. 

Speed isn't the only plus 
you get from the FD. The 
SWAP command, which 
RAMLink and RAIVlDhve al- 
so have, makes the FD even 
more compatible. You can, 
for example, use the FD as 
a data drive for some pro- 
grams and even for down- 
loading from QuantumLink 
by swapping the unit to 
drive 8. You can also let the 
FD play RAMLink, giving 
you a variety of areas for var- 
ious tasks. The FD will let 
you switch configurations by 
popping in a different disk, 
something you can't do on a 
RAIVI device without reformat- 
ting the whole thing. This 
makes the FD drive wonder- 
fully flexible. When you add 
an actual RAfvl device into 
the mix, the possibilities are 
almost endless! 

If you use GEOS, the FD 
drive will be especially excit- 
ing. To be able to fully ac- 
cess its various partition pos- 
sibilities, you'll want to buy a 
copy of Gateway Even with 
the deskTop, you'll have a 
fast 1581 at your disposal, 
which means 3200 blocks 
to pack full of GEOS files. 
But once you let Gateway 
take over, you'll be sailing 
along at warp speed. You 



can work with large native 
mode partitions that you can 
further divide Into subdirec- 
tories. You can even switch 
between partition types, al- 
though you can't copy be- 
tween them directly. 

Both geoShell and Dual- 
Top will also let you access 
native mode partitions, but 
only geoShell in its current 
version will also let you ac- 
cess subdirectories, In my 
opinion, a large partition or- 
ganized into subdirectories 
is the best possible storage 
arrangement for GEOS, 
whether on a disk, in RAfvl, 
or both. 

The utilities disk that 
comes with the FD drive in- 
cludes copy programs to 
transfer files or whole disks 
to FD disks and partitions. It 
also includes FD Tools, 
which takes care of most 
disk chores, including format- 
ting and creating various con- 
figurations of partitions. You 
don't actually need to use 
these programs, of course. 
If you're the kind of user 
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JiffyDOS commands, along 
with BASIC 2-0 and 7.0 com- 
mands, are presented with 
plenty of examples. There's 
also lots of technical informa- 
tion to let you really put the 
FD to work. The drive itself 
hooks up to your system 
just like any other disk 
drive, directly to your comput- 
er or daisychained to any oth- 
er drives. 

But, remember, this is not 
just another drive. It's spe- 
cial; it's an FD drive. 

STEVE VAN DER ARK 

Creative Micro Designs 

P, 0, Box 646 

East Longmeadow, MA 01028 

(800) 638-3263 

FD-2000— $179.95 

FD-4000— S249 95 

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Circle Reader Service Number 139 



REVIEWS 

SIMPLE SOUND 

Interested in programming sound on 
your SID sound chip? I attempt pro- 
gramming only rarely— then mostly in 
an effort to understand how things 
work. When ! do look into something 
technical, I want to be given just the in- 
formation I need. Too much becomes 
overwhelming. Simple Sound, from An- 
dor House, provides the right amount 
of information in small digestible 
chunks to familiarize you with the near- 
ly infinite capabilities of the famous 
Commodore SID chip. 

Sound IS a desirable element in a pro- 
gram. It adds punch and pizazz — and 
it can be useful as a reminder or cue 
to respond. The sound capabilities of 

G-10 COfulPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



the 64 are too important for a program- 
mer to ignore, and Simple Sound 
makes the introduction painless. Wel- 
come to kindergarten. 

The program begins by supplying 
documentation on disk, ready to be 
printed. After a brief introduction of 
what is available in the program, print 
out the main articfe that guides you 
through the sound tutorial. The pro- 
gram points out right away that it's tak- 
ing you only through programming 
voice 1 in BASIC. The SID chip has 
three voices, but for an introduction to 
sound, voice 1 is all you really need. 

You are shown how to clear the SID 
chip and how to program it by poking 
values into it. You are then referred to 
one of several other programs on the 
disk called Print Hi/Lo Frequency. Load- 
ing and listing this program lo the 
screen gives you the high and low 



frequencies for musical notes in a 
chart of eight octaves listing the notes 
and their frequencies. Run the pro- 
gram to get a printout on paper. 

Next, the program describes the 
sound envelope, which is the shape of 
the sound — how it begins, holds, and 
fades away. At this point, you are re- 
ferred to another program on disk 
called ASDR Graph. This program dis- 
plays a typical sound envelope and its 
ASDR settings. This is all explained in 
another article. 

Finally, you are introduced to wave- 
forms. This topic is illustrated by its 
own program and graph. 

The main article fills four pages print- 
ed at 40-column width. As the article 
takes you through each step, it lists a 
sample program so you can see how it 
works. This program can then be load- 
ed and run to hear the sound that it cre- 
ates. You can then list it to study the ex- 
ample in more detail. 

This sample fits on one screen for 
convenience and contains remarks to 
explain what each line does. You can 
then experiment by changing values. 
This gives you a good idea of what pro- 
gramming sound is like. 

The disk also carries some sound ef- 
fects programs for you to experiment 
with. All of these samples are written 
with remarks and suggestions for 
changes that you might want to make. 

Another program, Notecracker. pro- 
vides a quick way to see what small 
changes can do to sound by allowing 
you to enter values for each element 
you've learned about in the lessons. 
You then get to hear your sounds. 

Words that come to mind when I 
use this program are considerate, con- 
venient, and clear. Simple Sound puts 
programming the SID chip within 
reach of the novice. The author, Don Ra- 
dler, shows consideration in the small 
size and simple nature of the sample 
programs that he builds with you. 
There's convenience in that the pro- 
gram is self-contained with its concise 
documentation, onscreen illustrations, 
and examples. 

Finally, the clarity of the explanations 
is the program's greatest asset. It 
makes it downright easy to program 
voice 1. After going through the tutori- 
al a few times, going on to master voic- 
es 2 and 3 no longer seems intimidat- 
ing. You'll feel more comfortable work- 
ing with sound after you've established 
a good foundation with Simple Sound. 

ROBIN MINNICK 

Andor House 

Don Radler 

3907 SE Second Ave, 

Cape Coral, FL 33904 

$4,95 

Circle Reader Serv ce Number 41S L) 



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Circle Reader Service Number 114 



FEEDBACK 



Where to find 

Commodore 

software, how to 

clean your 

heyboard, and a 

source for 

Okimate printer paper 



Where's the Software? 

Is the 64 starting to die? I 
sure hope it isn't. Unfortunate- 
ly, it seems to me that there 
are fewer and fewer places 
selling 64 software these 
days. There are only two 
stores in the city of San Anto- 
nio that still sell 64 products. 
Are major companies still pro- 
ducing products for us? If so, 
who are they? And where can 
I get GEOS for the 64? 

DOUG DENNY 
SAN ANTONIO. TX 

In business terms, the 64 is 
considered to be a mature 
market. Ttiat's a polite term 
for one ttiat isn't growing. The 
computer has been around 
for more than a decade, and 
almost everybody v/ho wants 
a 64 already has one. Also, 
those users have already pur- 
chased most of the software 
that they want. too. Before 
they dropped the Commo- 
dore line, software develop- 
ers saw sales of their prod- 
ucts plummet. New titles just 
didn't sell, and merchants 
can't devote shelf space to 
items that the public doesn't 
buy. Unfortunately, a large 
number of people who once 
used Commodores have 
moved on to other platforms, 
and that's where the action is 
now. 

There is still a good solid 
core of dedicated Commo- 
dore users, but it doesn't 
have the numbers it once did. 
Alt of this means that whenev- 
er a new product for the 64 
comes out. instead of 
100.000 copies being sold, 
the number has dropped to 
1000— or less. Major compa- 
nies v/ith large overheads 
can't make a profit on sales of 
that size. 

If you look through the ad- 
vertisements in Gazette, you'll 
see new products for sale, 
but In most cases, the firms of- 
fering them are small. In 
many ways, the market Is 



back to where it was in the ear- 
ly days, A lone programmer 
gets an Idea, writes the 
code, and then sells the pro- 
gram by mail from his or her 
house or post office box. On- 
ly now, the number of buyers 
is no longer growing. 

There are still a few major 
distributors for Commodore 
products. Two of the largest 
are Software Support Interna- 
tional (800) 356-1179 and Ten- 
ex (800) 776-6781. Call for a 
catalog. Moving up in the num- 
ber of 64/128 products han- 
dled is Creative Micro De- 
signs. This firm distributes a 
good number of Commodore 
items, both hardware and soft- 
ware. CMD is also the place 
to buy any GEOS products. 
Call (800) 638-3263 to order 
or to request a catalog. 

Last December Gazette 
published a list of large and 
small companies that still han- 
dle Commodore products. An 
updated version of that list is 
in the works. The best way to 
keep the 64 alive is to sup- 
port those companies that sup- 
port the 64. 

Keyboard Cleaning 

I have to press some of the 
keys on my 64 quite firmly be- 
fore they register. I think the 
contacts must be dirty. I've 
read the procedure for disman- 
tling a keyboard and cleaning 
it, but now that I need the in- 
structions, I can't find them. 
Can you help? 

JiM GORDON 
BLOOMINGTON. IN 

Keyboard problems can often 
be traced to dirty contacts. 
Some keys may stick slightly 
resulting in their printing 
twice. Cleaning usually takes 
care of these problems. It's 
not too difficult, but it does re- 
quire some care. Before you 
tackle the job. have on hand 
some isopropyl alcohol, a sol- 
dering iron, and a couple of 
Phillips screwdrivers. 



Turn over your 64 and re- 
move the three screws. This 
will let you remove the top of 
the case. Be careful with the 
plastic tabs that act as hing- 
es. Unplug the wires that are 
connected to the red pilot 
light. A plug pulls out from the 
socket: you don't have to un- 
solder them. 

Turn the top of the case 
down, exposing the bottom of 
the keyboard. You'll see a 
number of small Phillips-head 
screws holding on the key- 
board bottom. Remove these 
screws and put them in a 
safe place. Then, unsolder 
the two bare wires that con- 
nect beneath the Shift Lock 
key. Do not unsolder any of 
the colored wires. 

Remove the bottom cover 
of the keyboard, and you'll 
see a large circuit board on 
the other side. This is where 
the contacts are for the keys. 
If you see any obvious dirt or 
foreign material, be sure to re- 
move it. Then dampen a 
clean cloth with the alcohol 
and rub it gently over the en- 
tire circuit board. Pay close at- 
tention to clean the square cir- 
cuit areas. 

Reach under the keyboard 
and press each key. A bar un- 
der each key that makes the 
actual contact will come up 
out of a hole. Clean each of 
these bars as well. 

Allow the board to dry thor- 
oughly and then resolder the 
two wires and reassemble the 
keyboard. It should work 
good as new. 

Okimate Paper 

I run Ihree businesses from 
my home: a mobile DJ serv- 
ice, a radio/TV production fa- 
cility, and a message-on-hold 
service. I do it all on a 128 
with GEOS. I have two 1571 
drives and a 2MB BBG from 
PPII that I manage with 
CMD's Gateway. 

' alternate among three dif- 
fer3nt printers, depending on 



G-12 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



the job I am doing. I use a 
Star NX-1000C for everyday 
printing; a Brotlier HR-25 dai- 
sywheel for letter quality busi- 
ness correspondence; and 
an Okimate-10 for banners, 
posters, and other graphics. 

The Okimate (thermal trans- 
fer and no ribbon, remem- 
ber?) works great with the 
high-quality fax paper that's 
available in most office sup- 
ply stores. A guy in a print 
shop recently asked if the fli- 
er I'd printed on the Oki was 
printed on a laser printer. 

Thanks for all your support 
over the years, and I guess I'll 
keep banging away on this 
old thing until the keys fall off. 

PRESTON THOMPSON 
FREDERICKSBURG. VA 

Thanks for the tip. Preston. 
I'm sure many readers will ap- 
preciate this new source of pa- 
per for their Okimate printers. 

Renumber 

I am writing my first decent- 
sized BASIC program for the 
64. Through an interface on 
my user port, it will operate 
the solenoids of a game. To 
proceed, I need two things. 

First, I need a program 
that will renumber the lines of 
my program. It must allow me 
to select the starting line num- 
ber and the interval. 

Second, I am trying to lo- 
cate a book called Commo- 
dore Interfacing Blue Book. 
The publisher Is Microsignal 
Press, but it is out of busi- 
ness. Can anyone help me lo- 
cate this book? 

F. KOSTER 
171AL0NG HILL DH 
YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY 10598 

Perhaps one of our readers 
can help you locate the book 
you want, but we have a re- 
numbering utility that works 
with the press of a function 
key. Gazette published Re- 
number 64 by IHubert Crpss 
in the November 1987 isiue. 



This short machine language 
utility does what you want, 
and it also renumbers referenc- 
es made in GOTOs. 
GOSUBs. ON-GOTOs. and 
ON-GOSUBs. 

A few copies of this issue 
are still available. The U.S. 
price for the magazine is $6 
and $3 for the companion 
disk. These prices are valid 
for any issue prior to October 
1990. You can order by writ- 
ing to COivlPUTE's Gazette. 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200. Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. 

Good tuck with your game. 
Let us know how the project 
turns out. 

Disk Finder 

I am writing a program that I 
want to be as user friendly as 
possible, I think I have cov- 
ered all the possibie prob- 
lems that I can think of but 
one. Is there a routine that I 
can use to tell whether or not 
there's a disk in the user's 
1541 drive? 

RICHARD BLAKE 
ALTON, IN 

Trying to anticipate every er- 
ror that a user might make 
can mean a lot of code for 
your program, but it's a good 
idea. Here's a short routine 
that might do the trick. 

It's a good idea to check 
first to make sure that the 
drive is turned on. That's han- 
dled in lines 1000-1040. 
Then try to initialize the disk 
and read the Error channel. 
We do that in lines 1050- 
1100. 

This routine could be insert- 
ed at the start of your pro- 
gram if you omitted the RE- 
TURN command in line 1 1 10 
and appended the rest of 
your code from there. 

1DD0OPEN 15,8,15: CLOSE 15 
1010 IF ST =0 THEN 50 
1020 PRINT* TURN ON YOUR 
DRIVE AND PRESS A KEY" 



A renumbering utility 
for programmers, 
a way to determine 
wliether or not 
a dislf is in a drive, 
and reader 
requests for programs 



1030 GET A$: IFflJ =" "THEN 1030 
104<] GOTO 1000 
1050 OPEN 15,8,15,"l" 
10BD INPUT#15,E:CL0SE15 
1D70iFE = DTHEN 1110 
1080 PRINT "INSERT A DISK IN 

YOUR DRIVE AND PRESS 

ANY KEY" 
1090 GET A$:IFA$=" "THEN 1090 
1100 GOTO 1050 
111D RETURN 

Software Wanted 

I've looked all over for soft- 
ware for the 64 and I've 
found a lot of good word proc- 
essors, but there's one pro- 
gram that I can't find. I'd like 
to have a program that 
checks my grammar after I've 
written something. Has any- 
one written such a program 
or seen such a program for 
the 64? 

MIGAILL RICE 
CINCiNNATTl.OH 

Has Gazette ever published a 
hurricane tracking map? If 
not, I'm sure those of us who 
live along the Atlantic coast 
would lil<e to have one. I'd 
like to see a program that 
would present a map of the At- 
lantic coastline, Gulf of Mexi- 
co, and Caribbean. Each day 
you could enter a hurricane's 
latitude and longitude, and 
the program would plot the 
points on the map. As the 
plots were updated, you 
could see the path of the 
storm and have some idea of 
where it might strike next. 

LOU ROSEN 
CORAL GABLES. PL 

If any programmers have writ- 
ten programs similar to 
these, we'd be interested in 
publishing them. 



Do you have a question or 
comment? Write to Gazette 
feedback. COMPUTE Publica- 
tions, 324 West Wendover Av- 
enue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. □ 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-13 



PD PICKS 



Steve Vander Ark 



ZIX AND STONES 



Kere are a couple 

of outstanding 

games fliat will 

make your list 

of Top Ten favorites. 



G-14 



OK, enough serious stuff for a 
while. It's time for another 
shot of adrenaline-pumping, 
toe-curiing action games. I've 
played through a bunch of 
great public domain and share- 
ware games to bring you a cou- 
ple of the best programs for 
the 64 and 128. It's a tough 
job, but someone has to do it. 

Before we charge head- 
long into the latest batch of the 
deadliest games around, let 
me run something else by you. 
A popular telecommunica- 
tions service of interest to Com- 
modore users is GEnie. The 
Commodore libraries on GE- 
nie are quite extensive. If you 
happen to know the file num- 
ber of the program you want, 
all you need to do is request 
a download and feed in thai 
number. That's the fastest way 
to download a specific pro- 
gram, and since you're paying 
by the minute, fasf means you 
save money 

Just because I'm such a 
nice guy. I'll include the GEnie 
file number of each PD pro- 
gram that I mention in this col- 
umn. If I find that the file isn't 
available on GEnie, I'll upload 
it there. How's that for service? 

This month's first game, Su- 
per Rockfall, is another master- 
piece from Mark Dickenson. 
The other is Zix, an outstand- 
ing version of the old Breakout 
game. Both of these great pro- 
grams will get your blood 
pumping and your joystick 
jumping. 

Super Rockfall by Mark Dick- 
enson, Q-Link filenames: 
SUPR0CKFALL1.SDA (190 
blocks) and SUPROCK- 
FALL2.SDA (28 blocks). Both 
files are required and were 
uploaded by Mark AD E. GE- 
nie file number is 8916. 

This outstanding 64 pro- 
gram is reputed to be the best 
game on Q-Link. That's a mat- 
ter of taste, but from a review- 
er's point of view, considering 

COIVlPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



programming pizazz, user 
friendliness, game mechan- 
ics, and playability. Super 
Rockfall wins hands down. 

Yes, it's a fabulous game, a 
remake of the venerable Dig 
Dug arcade game. There's 
more strategy per screen in 
Rockfall than you can imag- 
ine. And there's plenty of 
chance to abuse your joystick 
as you try to tumble little boul- 
ders into the right places and 
try not to start an avalanche. 
All this action should certainly 
put Super Roci<;fall into any- 
body's Top Ten, but there's a 
lot more. For example, there's 
a screen editor to let you cre- 
ate your own fiendish challeng- 
es to foist on your friends. 

A lot of delighted Rockfall 
fans have done just that, and 
you'll find a host of player-cre- 
ated levels on Q-Link, Mark 
Dickenson also added a very 
nice music player to the 
game, which, coming from the 
author of StereoSIDPIayer, is 
not surprising. When you down- 
load the game, it comes with 
a nice selection of SID music 
files to brighten your day You 
can even set the game to rec- 
ognize an extra SID sound 
chip if you have one. 

The documentation is anoth- 
er strong point. The simple 
fact that it has documentation 
sets it above a great many 
games you'll find on Q-Link or 
GEnie. Mark gives you not on- 
ly documentation but also a 
slick little viewer that lets you 
read it onscreen. 

Zix by Pierre Messier. Q- 
Link filename: ZIX2 (21 
blocks). Uploaded by Harold 
W1. GEnie file number: 6647. 

One nice feature on Q-Link 
is that users can post notes 
about files in the libraries. 
V(/hen you want to find a good 
program to download, you 
can browse through these com- 
ments and find out if there is 
a problem with a program or 
if other users have liked it I 
use these notes a lot as I dig 



for treasures in the Q-Link librar- 
ies, and when I started read- 
ing the comments on Zix, I re- 
alized that I had hit pay dirt. 
Someone even said that Zix 
was probably the best game 
on Q-Link after Super Rockfall. 
That got my attention. 

The first thing I noticed 
about Zix was how short it is. 
A short program is often short 
on graphics or sound effects. 
In this case, though, short sim- 
ply means tight, efficient pro- 
gramming in machine code, 
which results in an addicting 
and exciting game. 

The inspiration for this 
game, as I mentioned, is Break- 
out. I always loved that game, 
especially the fancier versions 
that included falling power 
pills and weird but wonderful 
brick layouts. Zix incorporates 
all these goodies, including 
the best one of all, the one 
that lets your paddle fire little 
bombs at the bricks, I don't 
know about you, but I love a 
game that lets you blast 
things into pixel dust with an 
endless supply of missiles, 

There are actually two ver- 
sions of this game on Q-Link. 
This one is the updated ver- 
sion which has a few minor 
bugs fixed and also includes 
paddle-speed control. The 
graphics and brick designs 
are the same in each, as are 
the various power pills. There 
is no documentation available, 
so you'll have to use trial and 
error to figure out what each 
pill does. There is also no way 
for you to know that pressing 
a number from 1 to 9 before 
you start playing adjusts the 
paddle speed or that you can 
cheat and get 99 lives by press- 
ing Control-P, but. hey, now 
I've told you! 

Each of these great games 
is a shining example of Com- 
modore programming at its 
best. You will seldom find pro- 
grams this exciting — at least 
not until you see what I've 
foul d tor next month! □ 



YOUR PRODUaiVITY! 



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Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents ot NC and NY please add appropriate sales tax for your 

area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling {$2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 surlace mail, S5.00 

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Mail this coupon to COMPUTE'S 1991 Utilities, 324 West Wendaver Ave., Ste. 200, 
Greensboro, NC 27408. 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Atter you've 
saved items to a 

file on disk, 

you need anotiier 

program to 

read lliem again. 



WHERE'S THE 
DATA? PART 3 

Last month, we wrote a short 
program to save a to-do list to 
a floppy disk. If you dutifully fol- 
lowed along, your list is now 
embedded as magnetic parti- 
cles on a piece of f\/lylar, await- 
ing retrieval. Here's a sfiort pro- 
gram to retrieve your list from 
tfie disk to your television or 
monitor screen. The items pop 
onto your screen as thiey're 
pulled from disk. 

148 PRINTCHR$(147) 

149 DIMIS(IOO) 

150 INPUT'IDOWN] NAME OF 
LISTTOLOAD";LS:IFL$="" 
THEN END 

160 OPEN1,B,0,LS 

170 INPUT#1,X 

180 PRINT 

190 F0RT=1T0X: INPUT#1,($(T): 

PRINTIS(T): NEXT 
200 CL0SE1: END 

Line 149 dimensions your 
item array (allots memory 
space for the list) to the same 
maximum size as when it was 
saved. Line 150 uses the IN- 
PUT statement to get the 
name of your list. Be sure to 
load the list using exactly the 
same name you used when 
you saved it. 

Line 160 is this month's crit- 
ical syntax line. The 1 after 
OPEN is the file number — the 
same number you gave the 
file last month. The 8 means 
you're communicating with 
the disk drive. The between 
the second and third commas 
tells the disk drive to load (as 
opposed to save) a file. LS is 
ttie name of the file that was in- 
put in line 150. 

INPUT* in line 170 is the 
command to pull the data 
from the disk. It's the opposite 
of PRINT#. which you used 
last month to save the data 
on the disk. 

The first thing we must get 
from the disk is the number of 



items that are on your to-do 
list. That quantity was sent to 
the disk last month as the var- 
iable X. You don't have to use 
X again per se, but you must 
use a similar variable type. X$ 
won't work. 

Once we have the quantity 
X, we can begin pulling each 
item from the disk, one by 
one, using a FOR-NEXT loop, 
the upper limit of which is X. 
Line 190 does the job. It uses 
INPUT* to load the array 
IS(T), then prints each item as 
it's retrieved. After the items 
have been loaded from the 
disk and printed onscreen, 
the file is closed in line 200 

Let's merge this and last 
month's programs. We can 
then make a couple of modifi- 
cations to add a simple 
menu. Follow these steps. 

1. Type in this month's pro- 
gram and save it to disk in 
case you make an error. 

2. Clear the screen. 

3. List the program at the top 
of the screen, but don't run it. 

4. White this month's program 
is showing, type under it 
LOAD"FlLENAME".8. where 
FILENAME is the name of the 
save-to-disk program we 
wrote last month. 

5. Last month's program is 
now in the computer's memo- 
ry, and this month's program 
is showing on your screen. 
Don't clear the screen. 

6. Move your cursor to the top 
of the screen and begin press- 
ing the Return key on each of 
this month's program lines. 
When finished, the programs 
will be merged. 

7. Clear the screen and list 
the program to confirm that 
vou have lines 10 through 
200. 

8. Add these lines. 

35 PRINT'TCLRIIDOWN] DO YOU 
WANT TO SAVE OR" 

36 PRINT"[DOWN] LOAD A LIST 
(S/L)?" 

37 GETAS: IFAS <>"S" THEN 



IFA$ <>"L" THEN37 
38 IFA$ ="L" THENISa 

9. Add END at the end of line 
140. It should read as follows. 

140 CL0SE1: END 

10. Remove lines 148 and 
149. 

11. Save the merged pro- 
gram with a new filename, 
such as TODOLIST 

Lines 35-38 add a simple 
two-choice menu. Save in- 
cludes typing, saving, and 
printing the list on your TV or 
monitor screen. Load loads 
the list and prints it onscreen. 
Feel free to elaborate on and 
refine this menu to your liking. 
With a little creativity and 
some skillful programming, 
you can add features such as 
deleting or changing an item, 
prioritizing the list, or printing 
out a hard copy. 

Here's the entire listing 
with checksums for The Auto- 
matic Proofreader to help you 
avoid typing errors. 

AH 19 PRrNTC(IBS(147) 
GQ 2n DIMlSdaO) :PRINT" HO HOR 
E THAN 100 ITEMS 1":PRINT 
"{DOWN) PRESS ANY KEY TO 
BEGIN," 
GR 30 GETAS; !FAS"""THKN3fl 
HP 35 PRINT'MCLR) (DOWN) DO YOU 

WANT TO SAVE OB" 
CE 36 PRINT"{DOWNl LOAD A LIST 

(S/LI?" 
GD 37 GETAS: IFAS<>"S"THENIFAS< 

>"L"THEN37 
HK 38 IFAS="L"THEN15e 
BO 40 PRINTCHRS(1A7) 
CO 50 X=X+1: INPUT" TO DO"; ISC! 

) 
PF 60 IFIS [X) =""THENX-X-1:G0T0 

30 
EF 7E1 G0T04[I 
FM 8 a PBIMT 
KK 9S FOI!T = 1TOX:PRI>JTIS(T) :NEX 

T 
GC IBfl INPUT"(DOWNlNAME OF LIS 
T TO SAVE";LS: IFL3=""TH 
ENEND 
PA 110 OPENl,e,l,LS 
QA 128 PRINT!1,X 
FH 130 F0RT-1T0X:PRINT«1,IS(T) 

:NEXT 
03 148 CLOSEl:EtJD 
OH ISa !HPUT"lDOWN)^AHE OF LIS 
T TO LOAn";LS: IFLS=""TH 
ENEND 
PF IGO 0PEN1,B,B,LS 
PG 178 INPUTU.X 
QD IBO PRINT 
MQ 190 FORT=lTaX:ISPUTtl,IS (T) 

:PRINTIS IT) ;NEXT 
SH 200 CLOSEl Q 



G-16 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



COMMODORE 64/1 28 

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MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



Let Squiggle 

wander about your 

screen drawing 

lines while you ieam 

about arrays. 



G-18 



SQUIGGLE ARRAY 

The earliest Commodore com- 
puter, PET 2001 , was shipped 
with a tiny program called 
Squiggle. Squiggle, written in 
BASIC, draws a wandering 
line around the screen. We 
can rewrite this program in ma- 
chine language and learn a lit- 
tle about arrays as we do so. 

Depending on whether it is 
going up, down, left, or right, 
the line is drawn with charac- 
ter 221 or 192, a vertical or hor- 
izontal bar. You'll find these on 
the keyboard as the shifted - 
and ' keys. When the line ran- 
domly changes direction, one 
of the corner graphics, such 
as Gommodore-A, is used to 
make a continuous line. 

We use a table to decide 
which graphics character to 
print. The following 4 x 4 ta- 
bles (one in decimal and the 
other in hex) map the previous 
or old direction against the 
new direction of the squiggle. 

New (decimal) Old 

Up Down Left Right 

222 176 174 Up 

221 173 189 Down 

189 174 192 Left 

173 176 192 Right 

New (hex) Old 

Up Down Lett Right 

DD 00 BO AE Up 

00 DO AD BD Down 

BD AE CO 00 Lsft 

AD BO 00 CO Right 



Here's how to read the above 
table or two-dimensional ar- 
ray. If we're going up and 
want to continue to go up, we 
should print character 222, 
We can't go directly from up to 
down. The signals an illegal 
direction change. If we're go- 
ing up and want to go left, we 
must print character 176, that 
code for the Commodore-A 
key combination. 

Our table has four rows and 
four columns, each numbered 
0-3. The previous direction 

COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



sets the row number. Multiply 
it by 4 and add the new direc- 
tion (column), and you've 
reached the right spot in the ta- 
ble. We can multiply by 4 with 
two left-shift commands; it's 
handy to have a power-of-2 col- 
umn count. 

Two more things help make 
the job easy. First, each table 
entry fits within a single byte. 
And since the whole table fits 
within 256 bytes, we can 
reach any entry with simple in- 
dexing, rather than having to 
use indirect addressing. 

After we print the selected 
character, we must move the 
cursor in the appropriate direc- 
tion. Which way? The program 
reads a one-dimensional array 
(a list or vector) that looks up 
the cursor movements associ- 
ated with certain character 
codes: cursor up, down, left, 
and right for characters 145, 
17, 157, and 29, respectively 

We'll get pseudorandom 
numbers by reading consecu- 
tive bytes of ROM. Let's track 
the program flow. Detailed 
code is not given here; for a 
closer look, run the program 
and disassemble the machine 
language code. 

The program is poked into 
memory starting at hexadeci- 
mal $2000, decimal 8192. The 
table is located at $2073. You 
can see it in BASIC lines 190 
to 220. Behind it is the list of 
cursor movements, which will 
be placed at $2083. 

Clear the screen and move 
the cursor into the screen ar- 
ea. Set random number track- 
ing to ROM address SCOOO, 
Set the initial direction to up, 
code 0. Store this at address 
$2200. 

At $2021, the program is 
ready to start work on our fake 
random value. A value from 0- 
3 sets our new random direc- 
tion. Each ROM location can 
give us four such values, two 
bits at a time. We extract the 
byte from ROM, store it away 
at address $2201, and hacl< 



off two bits. This give us the ran- 
dom value for the new direc- 
tion, which we store at ad- 
dress S2202. 

The old direction is stored 
at $2200; the new at $2202. 
Time to look up our 4 x 4 ta- 
ble to get the printable char- 
acter. A would signal an ille- 
gal direction. 

Multiply previous direction 
by 4 (two ASL commands). 
Add the new direction; in this 
case, a logical OR will do the 
job just as well. The result, 
transferred to the X register, 
gives the offset from the start 
of the table at $2073. Simple 
indexing will grab the charac- 
ter we need. 

2033 LDA $2200 

2036 ASL A 

2037 ASL A 

2038 ORA $2202 
203B TAX 

203C LDA $2073,X 
203F BNE $2049 

If the character from the ta- 
ble is a value other than 0, we 
leap ahead and print it. Re- 
member, signals an illegal di- 
rection, meaning the line 
wants to double back upon it- 
self. In this case, we'll just tell 
it to continue in the direction 
that it was traveling, or in com- 
puter language, set the new 
direction to equal the previ- 
ous direction. 

2041 LDA $2200 
2044 STA $2202 
2047 BPL $2033 

Note that the above BPL al- 
ways branches. Can you see 
why? 

At $2049, the character is 
printed, followed by a cursor 
left. We go to our second ar* 
ray to send the cursor in the 
right direction. Incidentally, 
we also set the previous-direc- 
tion value to the nev/-direction 
value. 

The Run/Stop key is check- 
ed at 205D. A little work to set 



up the next fake random val- 
ue, and we loop back. 

The program ends when 
we scan past the end of ROM 
or when the Run/Stop key is 
pressed. 

Squiggle runs on virtually 
ali Commodore 8-bit ma- 
chines but doesn't behave 
quite the same on each. The 
128, for example, cheerfully 
opens up space on the 
screen when the line runs off 
the right-hand side. Of 
course, the ROMs are differ- 
ent in each computer, too. 

You'll quickly discover that 
ROM reading isn't the finest 
way to generate random val- 
ues. Many values produce 
lots of Up commands, and 
the line will often bump use- 
lessly against the top of the 



screen. You'll see distinctive 
movement patterns as the pro- 
gram scans through repetitive 
parts of ROM. 

Machine language Squig- 
gle runs several hundred 
times faster than its BASIC 
forebear. Sixteen thousand 
moves will take place in less 
than a minute. That's too fast 
for easy viewing, so you 
might like to try your hand at 
slowing it down so that you 
can see the line moving. An- 
other possible project would 
be to add code to keep the 
wiggling line from trying to 
run offscreen. 

Here's the BASIC listing for 
Squiggle to get you started. 
Once the program pokes the 
machine language code into 
place, Squiggle takes off. 



XA 110 

KF 12B 
MM 13B 
BB H2 

GS 158 



RR 170 

CE 180 

ftE I9B 

GK 200 

HM 2ia 

EM 220 

GC 230 

BE 230 

QJ 300 

DS 310 

□0 320 

PP 330 

FM 3-10 

MP 130 



DATA 

,162, 

55,16 

DATA 

243,1 

92,13 

DATA 

,o,n 

DATA 

,3,H 

DATA 

189,1 

34 

DATA 

,219, 

,255 

DATA 

LB9,1 

DATA 

173,1 

□ATA 

e, 2,2 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

PRINT 

FOH J 

BEAD 

POKE 

NEXT 

IF T< 

SYS 8 



169,147,32,210,255 

10,169,17,32,210,2 

9,29 

32,210,255,202, 16, 

69,3,133,253,169,1 

3,254 

162,0,142,0,34,160 

7,253,141,1,34 

78,1,34,78,1,34,41 

1,2,34, 173,0,34 

10,10,13,2,34,170, 

15,32,209,8,173,0, 

141,2,34,16,234,32 
255,169,157,32,210 



174,2 
31,32 
32,22 
34,2 
144,1 
3fl,25 
221,0 
0, 221 
189,1 
173,1 
145,1 
"SQU 
8192 
X:T-T 
J,X 
J 

>1582 
192 



,34,142,0,34 , 

,32,210,255 

5,255,240,16, 

09,192,4 

90,230,253,29 

4,2aa,175,96 

,176,174 

,173,189 

74,192,0 

76,0,192 

7,29,157 

ICGLBl" 

TO 6326 
+X 



825 THEN STOP 







^,^(^^t£o^.'&;t 



i.,.-/?^.^-^. 



Don't wait until your bad days 

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MAPPING 

THE 

Commodore 

64&64C 



The classic best-selling 
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guide. Mapping the Com- 
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comprehensive memory 
guide for beginning and advanced programmers. 

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NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-19 



PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



Randy Thompson 



INTERFACE AGONY 
AND ECSTASY 



If you've ever 

struggled witfi 

Commodore printers 

and inteilaces, 

liere's some good 

advice sent 

in liy a reader. 



G-90 



This month I'm reprinting a let- 
ter sent in by Jack Blewitt of 
Rockford, Illinois, that should 
interest anyone who has ever 
struggled with Comnnodore 
printers and interfaces, I've ed- 
ited it slightly for size. 

"The May 1993 issue of Ga- 
zette's 'Feedback' column 
helped a reader vi^ith a printer 
underlining problem. As com- 
prehensive as the answ/er 
was, it did not mention one of 
the prime reasons many print- 
er problems occur: peculiari- 
ties of specific printer interfac- 
es. Even if you don't have one 
of these interfaces, you 
should be aware of the prob- 
lems they may cause just in 
case you ever decide to write 
a program for others to use. 

"The Cardco-B, Cardco-FG, 
Super-G, and Gee-Whiz inter- 
faces were designed to emu- 
late both Commodore- and Ep- 
son-compatible printing 
modes. In these emulation 
modes, the interface trans- 
lates many special printer com- 
mands before passing them 
along to the printer. Some print- 
er commands are ignored 
when the interface doesn't un- 
derstand them. Because you 
may want to use a printer fea- 
ture that the interface doesn't 
directly support, you can use 
the OPEN command's secon- 
dary address (SA) to tell the 
pnnter interface to pass print- 
er commands through unal- 
tered. Even when the inter- 
face's DIP switches are set to 
transparent mode, certain SA 
values allow you to override 
that setting, 

"For example, to ensure 
that your printer commands 
reach the printer, you should 
use an SA of 0, 1 , 7, or 8 when 
you want to send Commodore- 
specific printing commands 
such as Reverse, Expanded, 
7-pin graphics, and so on. If 

COMPUTE NOVEt^lBER 1993 



you want to use Epson-specif- 
ic printer commands for such 
things as underlining or Q-pin 
graphics, send them through 
a printer channel that was 
opened with an SA of either 4 
or 5 (depending on your de- 
sired line spacing). Remem- 
ber, there is no reason you 
can't have more than one print- 
er channel open at the same 
time — each with its own 
unique SA value— so printer 
commands can be mixed if 
necessary, 

"If your word processor 
doesn't allow you to change 
the SA to access your printer, 
as with The Write Stuff, you 
might consider locking your in- 
terface into transparent mode 
before loading the program. 
With the Cardco and PPI inter- 
faces, you do this by adding 
a 20 to the SA value, For ex- 
ample, by executing the follow- 
ing command prior to running 
your word processor, you lock 
the interface in Epson mode, 

OPEN 4,4,25: PRINT#4,"EPS0N 
MODE LOCKED": CLOSE 4 

"Please note that many print- 
ers, such as Legend and 
Siekosha printers, use the SA 
for their own special purpos- 
es. Since it is impossible for 
programmers to test their 
code on every type of printer/ 
interface, you must patiently 
experiment with SA values, 

"Another handy tip to re- 
member is to use the CHRS() 
function instead of the actual 
letter designates when send- 
ing pnnter commands, if your 
interface's ASCII translation is 
turned on, an uppercase E 
might be converted to lower- 
case, thus changing your print- 
er command to something 
that might not work. By send- 
ing commands such as the fol- 
lowing, you should have 
much greater success with 
printer codes. 

PRINT#4,CHRS(27);CHR$(B9): 



REM CHR$(69) equals E 

"Each interface has its own 
special set of printer codes 
and so do most printers. 
Checl<; your manual anytime a 
program doesn't produce the 
results you anticipate. Be par- 
ticularly careful when prepar- 
ing to print graphics. A Star 
NX-1000 printer is not the 
same as an NX-1000C {C for 
Commodore version), and so 
on. Even with the same print- 
heads, it is not possible to ac- 
tivate the 9-pin graphics on a 
Commodore version of the 
same printer. 

"If you want your graphics 
to print on a computer with 
the Hot-Shot-i- interface, never 
use the <ESC><"*"> Select 
Graphics Mode commands, 
Hot-Shot+ works all right at 
80DPI, but it balks if you at- 
tempt to print at 120DPI in 
this mode. This is probably 
why so many Hot-Shot-i- own- 
ers went bananas trying to 
make Paperclip Publisher 
print. Hot-Shot+ uses <"*"> 
as a proprietary command 
and will not pass it to the print- 
er. Using the interface's K, L, 
Y, and Z equivalents works 
with all interfaces to change 
graphics density and pre- 
vents the above catastrophe. 

"It is the responsibility of 
Commodore users to read 
and understand the features 
of their equipment. There are 
just too many hardware config- 
urations out there for program- 
mers to meet the needs of 
everyone. If you find that you 
need specific help, check 
with your local Commodore us- 
er's group to see if an expert 
there is using the same print- 
er and/or printer interface you 
are. And while you're getting 
help, be sure to share your 
own discoveries. Good Com- 
modore support is getting 
hard to find." 

If you have a good printer 
tip, send it to Gazette, We'll 
share it with our readers, □ 




Gazene 
Index 



Everything's included! 

Features, games, reviews, 
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A superb interface includes pull- 
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An options screen allows you to 
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Choose from three modes of opera- 
tion — browse for quick scanning, 
view for detailed information and 
descriptions, and edit for adding 
items from upcoming issues — and 
print to any printer. There's even a 
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WORKING 

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BoySianek 



"•K/sl.'"'' 



GEOS 



Steve Vander Ark 



GEnie is an online 

service that 

has a lot to offer 

Commoilore 

and GEOS users. 



A GEOS USER'S 
GUIDE TO GENIE 

If you've read my columns, 
you know that I'm excited 
about QuantumLink. I spend 
quite a lot of time there, pok- 
ing around the libraries for 
files to download or chatting 
with other users over a game 
of bingo. As I've said before, 
if you're a Commodore user, 
you should be on Q-Link. 
There will never be another 
service like Q-Link with so 
much to offer 64 users. 

But Q-Link isn't the only 
game in town. One of the 
more popular online services 
these days is GEnie. GEnie 
supports any type of comput- 
er, from the Apple II to main- 
frames, by sending and receiv- 
ing ASCII text rather than 
graphics. 

GEnie has a special area de- 
voted to our machines that's 
called the 64/128 Flagship. It's 
run by John Brown, the fellow 
behind Parsec and Twin Cities 
128 Magazine. In the Flag- 
ship, John maintains mes- 
sage, libraries, and so on. 

The resident GEOS expert 
is a programmer and writer 
named Robert Knop; his 
name online is R.KNGPI. He 
visits the Flagship regularly, 
making sure GEOS users get 
the help and information that 
they need. 

One way GEOS users can 
get all this help and informa- 
tion is by visiting the bulletin 
board area. There is a whole 
category devoted to GEOS 
messages. Subject areas in- 
clude converter programs, 
mega fonts, font editors, ge- 
oPublish, gateway, and geo- 
Programnning in geoBASIC or 
geoProgrammer. You can 
read the messages, add your 
own responses, or ask ques- 
tions of your own. 

You can meet other people 
in the evenings in the Real- 
Time Conference area. Here 



you chat live with other Com- 
modore users from around the 
country. You can often find 
John Brown himself, under the 
name C128-JBEE. Look for 
Doug Cotton from Creative M\- 
cro Designs, too. 

There are no officiaily sched- 
uled GEOS chat times, nor is 
there a separate GEOS chat ar- 
ea as there is on Q-Link. Rob 
Knop, however, hosts the con- 
ference area on Thursday 
nights. That's a great time to 
get GEOS information. 

Of course, one of the more 
popular areas in the Flagship 
is the file library, which is full 
of great Commodore pro- 
grams just waiting to be down- 
loaded. There are 47 different 
libraries, each containing pro- 
grams devoted to a particular 
aspect of Commodore comput- 
ing. You can find terminal pro- 
grams in library 6, for exam- 
ple, or 128 graphics in library 
28. There are games galore, 
lots of SID music files, graph- 
ics, and utilities for anything 
you can imagine. Every week 
or so, John posts a list of the 
best from the latest crop of 
files. This makes your hunt for 
the latest and best programs 
a little quicker and easier. 

As you might guess, there 
are several libraries for GEOS 
flies. Library 35 is GEOS appli- 
cations and utilities, number 
36 is for GEOS graphics, and 
number 37 is for GEOS fonts. 
Kent Smotherman, Irv Cobb, 
and other crack GEOS pro- 
grammers regularly upload 
their programs here. 

Some of the more recent 
uploads in the applications li- 
brary Include an 80-column ver- 
sion of the popular geoWrite 
utility Toolkit and a disk direc- 
tory printer which makes list- 
ings just the right size for 1 581 
disks. There's also a blank key- 
board overlay done in geo- 
Paint that you can customize 
tor your own needs. Another us- 
er who is handy with his Han- 
dyscanner has been upload- 



ing scanned photographs to 
the graphics library. 

Over in the font library you'il 
find some very useful fonts, 
good for sensible word proc- 
essing. There are also a few 
crazier ones such as Mega Val- 
dez, which looks like it's dnp- 
ping oil. 

If you're interested in com- 
ing aboard the Flagship on GE- 
nie, be prepared to spend a lit- 
tle money, especially at first. It 
can be more than a little con- 
fusing as you try to figure your 
way through the extensive 
menu system, You'll be paying 
by the hour while you wander 
around, so pian on a few 
large bills while you learn the 
ropes. The best way to learn 
anything is by doing it, and GE- 
nie is no exception. Before 
long you'll be sailing through 
the menus like an expert. Be- 
lieve me, gaining access to 
this source of help, informa- 
tion, and programs is well 
worth the cost. 

Here's how you can sign on 
to GEnie: 

• Set your terminal software 
for half duplex (local echo) 
at 300, 1200, or 2400 bps. 

• In the U.S. dial (800) 638- 
8369: in Canada dial (800) 
387-8330. 

• Upon connection, type 
HHH. 

• At the L'#= prompt, type 
XTX99018.COMMRT and 
then press Return. 

• Have a major credit card or 
your checking account infor- 
mation handy. 

When you sign on with the 
COMMRT password, that 
puts you on the Commodore 
users' mailing list, and it gives 
the Flagship credit for signing 
up a new user. 

Once you're aboard, be 
sure to drop me a note. My 
screen name is S.VANDER- 
ARK. I'm always happy to an- 
swer questions and listen to 
comments! G 



G-22 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all with the 
Gazette Productivity 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 

A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with alt 
the features you'd expect 
in an expensive commercial package 

(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 

Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy. What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 

1 




(MaslerCard and Visa accepted on orders with subWtal over S20). 



Productivity Manager <li8k(s) 



LJ YES! Please send me . 

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DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'Ignazio 



When children enter 

the classroom, 

Oiey're cut off hum 

tlie world that 

they have explored 

so h^ly for 

the first five years of 

their lives. 



ARE SCHOOLS 
READY FOR OUR 
CHILDREN? 

I have a four-year-old daugh- 
ter, Laura, who is almost ready 
for school — but I'm not sure 
school is ready for her. 

She has been working on 
computers since she was one 
year old, and she is now an 
accomplished "mouseketeer." 
She can find and click a sin- 
gle pixel on a high-resolution 
computer screen. 

Her introduction to reading 
and math skills has included 
a variety of learning programs 
that resemble videogames 
more than they resemble text- 
books. Among her favorites 
are Edmark's Millie's Math 
House, Sierra On-Line's Alpha- 
bet Blocks. EA'Kids' Eagle 
Eye Mysteries, and Voyager's 
AmandaStohes, She also uses 
CD-ROM encyclopedias, in- 
cluding Compton's Multime- 
dia Encyclopedia; National Ge- 
ographic's Mammals; and Dis- 
cis' and Brederbund's CD- 
ROM storybooks such as 
Scary Poems for Rotten Kids, 
Just Grandma and Me, and 
Arthur's Teacher Trouble. 

Laura is comfortable with 
computers, but she's not a tod- 
dler nerd, in fact, she spends 
only a few minutes a day at 
the computer. Like any four 
year old, most of her "work" 
takes her outdoors and into 
the company of other people. 

She spends a couple of 
mornings a week at day care. 
She attends toddler play gym 
at the YMCA, and she goes to 
dance class and art class. In 
the summer, she attends vari- 
ous camps, including swim 
camp and dinosaur camp. 

Like other kids of her gen- 
eration, Laura is a born button 
pusher. She has her own little 
Strawberry Shortcake boom 
box and her own Fisher-Price 
cassette player to play a li- 



brary of audio cassettes 
which feature Raffi "save the 
earth" songs, lullabies, and 
soundtracks from favorite mov- 
ies such as Aladdin and Little 
Mermaid. She has her own 
Sesame Street and Barney 
videotapes and confidently 
pops a videotape into the fam- 
ily VCR whenever she wants to 
see a movie. 

She is just as adept at other 
family appliances. She an- 
swers the cordless telephone, 
and she regularly leaves 
voice mail on her parents' of- 
fice phones. She publishes 
her own books by enlarging 
her drawings on her daddy's 
photocopier and then stapling 
the pages together. She's al- 
so a good little photographer 
and works the video camera 
like a pro. On occasion she 
has also sent her own faxes. 
Using a picture phone, she 
has transmitted a still image of 
her devilish grin to her grand- 
mother in the Florida keys. 

Laura is a normal kid in the 
gadget-rich 1990s. That is 
why I worry about her going to 
school next year. Laura's 
world is saturated with little 
electronic gadgets, but 
school is gadget-deprived. 

As a kindergartener Laura 
will be lucky if she has occa- 
sional access to a computer, 
She will have little chance to 
see movies, listen to tapes, or 
receive or make phone calls. 
If she does see a computer or 
other device, it will probably 
be in a tightly supervised situ- 
ation in which she is told to per- 
form narrowly defined tasks. 

This would contrast sharply 
to her prior experiences in 
which she has had the time 
and trust to explore the com- 
puter or any other machine. At 
school things are certain to be 
quite different. 

Some schools are now ex- 
perimenting with what they 
call lEPs, Individualized Edu- 
cation Plans. But this is precise- 
ly what preschool kids experi- 



ence before they ever reach 
school. Kids who are lucky 
enough to have the advantag- 
es that Laura has spend their 
days trooping all over the com- 
munity with parents, babysit- 
ters, and nannies, attending 
courses at a variety of commu- 
nity organizations. They expe- 
rience a well-rounded, highly 
satisfying version of school 
that takes place entirely out- 
side of school walls. 

Then these same kids turn 
five, and they enter school. 
They cross the threshold into 
the classroom, and they 
spend several hours each day 
cut off from the v/orld they 
have explored so freely the 
first five years of their lives. 

At home, if Laura wanted to 
contact her parents or grand- 
parents, she would call them. 
If there were an emergency, 
she would dial 911. She has 
been taught that four years old 
is not too young to take charge 
of her life and to "reach out and 
touch someone." 

At school, if Laura wanted 
to contact her parents or grand- 
parents, she would be told 
this was improper. She would 
learn the value of patience. 
And isolation. And powerless- 
ness. She would learn that 
five years old is not nearly as 
old as she had believed. 

And what about children 
less advantaged than Laura? 
They never have the opportu- 
nity to experience the richness 
of the world — either personal- 
ly or electronically — and nev- 
er have the opportunity to 
make decisions on their own. 
Then they turn five and go di- 
rectly fronn their disadvan- 
taged world into a disadvan- 
taged school. 

(Next month, we'll look into 
new educational strategies 
which turn Laura's classroom 
into an open system — a class- 
room without walls — where chil- 
dren are able to practice skills 
and use tools they will need in 
tomorrow's world.) O 



G-24 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



PROGRAMS 



SUPER SCREEN FONTS 

By Rick Kane 

Have you ever noticed how nice text 
looks on a PC clone with an EGA dis- 
play? The characters are clear and 
crisp, and they're also smoother and full- 
er than the Commodore character set. 
This is because the PC clone characters 
have twice the vertical resolution! It 
takes 16 bytes to define one of these char- 
acters instead of the 8 bytes per charac- 
ter we're used to looking at. Seems kind 
of unfair, doesn't it? 

Well, we don't have to put up with it an- 
ymore. 'While it isn't generally known, the 
Commodore 1 28 is capable of using the 
same 8- x 16-pixel character sets as 
those high-priced PCs. Actually a 128 
can use up to 32 scan lines per charac- 
ter, but I'm getting ahead of myself! It's 
really no secret, but part of the trick in- 
volves using the 80-column (8563) 
chip's interlace mode, which results in 
twice the usual number of vertical pixels 
in the same space. 

Not So Fast 

The backbone of this entire capability 
is a feature known as interlace sync 
and video mode. Never mind the jar- 
gon. Video is displayed as two fields, 
one for even-numbered scan lines and 
one for odd-numbered. This is what we 
mean by the term interlaced. First one 
field is displayed, and as it fades, the 
other is displayed in the course of Vao 
second, If not for this setup, your eyes 
would see the top of the screen fade be- 
fore the next frame could be drawn, re- 
sulting in less pleasing, and probably 
more tiring, television. 

In normal display mode, most com- 
puters display only one field; the other 
is left blank. This is fine for most purpos- 
es because the characters displayed 
are very sharp and there is no clarity 
problem in skipping the alternate field. 
By selecting interlaced mode, howev- 
er, the computer can display twice as 
many dots vertically. 

One additional note here: The much- 
talked-about flicker associated with in- 
terlace mode on most computers hap- 
pens because computers still display 
only one field every Vao second on al- 
ternate scan lines. True video and 
broadcast television display every Veo 
second. This means one field has a 



much longer time to fade before the oth- 
er field is displayed. A long-persis- 
tence monitor has phosphor on its 
CRT, which takes longer to fade out 
and helps to minimize the flicker. 

Uses for Interiace Mode 

Interlace can be used in a number of 
ways. One use is making super-high- 
resolution graphics, such as those pos- 
sible with I Paint. One drawback is 
that the resulting 640- x 400-pixel 
screen requires 32000 bytes for just a 
monochrome graphic, far more than 
the 16K supplied with the original 128. 
(The 128D comes with 64K of video 
RAI\/I.) Interlace can be invoked in text 
mode, however, and no extra memory 
is required. 

If you have PaperClip, the Pocket se- 
ries. Dialogue, Desterm, or 
SpeedScript 128 with SpeedSpell, you 
may have used a 50-row display 
mode. In this mode, these programs dis- 
play 50 rows of 80 8 X 8 characters — 
nearly a full page of text. Now 4000 
bytes are needed for screen memory, 
plus 4000 for color (attnbutes). Along 
with the 8K devoted to character defi- 
nitions, this fits nicely into the 16K pro- 
vided. An 80- X 50-row mode would al- 
so be handy in program editing, but it 
would require extensive rewriting of the 
screen editor, which would make this 
mode incompatible with most existing 
software. 

As I said, there is another way. 
Thanks to the flexibility of the 8563, we 
can switch to 8 x 16 characters. This 
is just like the EGA characters of PC 
clones. This way, the screen editor 
still works with 25 rows of characters. 
It doesn't care how you've defined the 
characters. All it's concerned with is put- 
ting the right character code at the 
right position on screen. The 8563 
takes care of the actual video rendition 
of the characters, much as the VIC 
chip does for 40 columns. As long as 
the program in question doesn't rede- 
fine the characters or reset the 8563, it 
will work just fine. And as you'll see, 
just a few modifications to 
SpeedScript 128 let you use your favor- 
ite word processor with more clarity 
than ever before! 

A Little Demo 

To get our initial 8x16 set, we'll use 



the 8 X 8 character set as a starting 
point, doubling each byte (scan line). 
So, if the original data was 
ABCDEFGH, the new character would 
be AABBCCDDEEFFGGHH. At this 
point, the skeptics are asking, "Why do 
this? Won't the result look essentially 
like the noninterlaced 8x8 charac- 
ters?" Well, yes and no. Type in Demo 
8 x 16 and run it for a demonstration 
of 8 x 16 characters and a hint of the 
possibilities for a new character set. 

Typing It In 

Demo 8 X 16 is written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
it with The Automatic Proofreader, See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. Be sure to save a copy of the pro- 
gram before you attempt to run it. 

The redefined characters in this de- 
mo give you some idea of the clarity in- 
volved with this mode. Not only do the 
characters look smoother, they allow 
more headroom between lines of text, 
giving a much cleaner overall took. Af- 
ter you run the demo, you can leave 
things as they are or reset the 128 by 
typing SYS 57721: SYS 65378. 

Building Characters 

SuperFont Editor lets you take full ad- 
vantage of this mode's capability. It al- 
lows you to create your own 8 x 16 su- 
perfont, although it can be used to edit 
8x8 fonts as well. An accompanying 
program provides the ability to quickly 
load your creations directly to the 80- 
column character definitions. 

SuperFont Editor is a full-featured ed- 
itor, with commands for copy, paste, re- 
verse, range copy and more. All this is 
possible on any 128, not just those 
with 64K of VDC RAM. 

In accomplishing its assigned 
tasks, SuperFont Editor uses the pow- 
er of BASIC 7.0 in some instructional 
ways. It uses both the underused WIN- 
DOW command {to give a more pleas- 
ing environment) and the little-known 
and nearly undocumented RREG com- 
mand (one of the most powerful com- 
mands in Basic 7.0). SuperFont Editor 
also shows some other interesting fea- 
tures of the 8563, such as independent 
cursor control. 

Typing More In 

Program 2 is SuperFont Editor, the 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



main program. All Commodore control 
and color codes have been defined as 
variables to make it easier to type. Pay 
attention to spaces in quules, because 
thiey affect the appearance of the 
screen. 

Program 3, Autoheader.maker, is a 
program which creates the header for 
setting the screen to 8 x 16 and rede- 
fining the characters. After entering 
and saving the program, run it, and it 
will create a file that is called 
SFONT.AUTOHEADER. The superfont 
you create will be appended to this 
file later. Once again, use The Automat- 
ic Proofreader to enter these programs 
without typos. 

Using SuperFont Editor 

When you first run SuperFont Editor, 
you will be presented with the editing 
grid showing the first character of the 
first character set at the upper left. Be- 
low it, an information window shows 
the current character, its screen code, 
and the character set. At the upper 
right is a display of most of the com- 
mands available. In the lower right, the 
current character set is displayed. 

First, let's talk about the function 
keys. Keys f1 and f2 are used to select 
the next higher or lower character in 
the set. 

Press f3 to select a character by typ- 
ing it in. You may press Ctrl-9 (reverse 
on) to edit the reverse image codes. 

Press f4 to alternate between the up- 
percase/graphics character set (set 0) 
and the uppercase/lowercase set (set 

1). 

Press f5 to toggle 8 x 8 or 8 x 16 
character mode. It doesn't do anything 
to the character set itself. With certain 
monitors, such as the 1902A and 
some 1084 series, the 8 x 16 mode 
will look fuzzy. If it does, press Alt-f5 to 
try 8 X 15 characters. Because of inter- 
nal differences in some monitors, the 
characters should now look sharper. 

Press 16 either to double the data in 
an 8 X 8 character set, giving a low- 
res 8 x 16 set to start from, or to re- 
store the system character set. If you 
change back to 8 x 8 mode after dou- 
bling the character set, you will see 
just the top half of the 8 x 16 font. Eve- 
rything still works; you just can't really 
read the screen. 

Press f7 to load a previously saved 

G-26 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



8x16 character set for further editing. 
You can get a directory by typing $ for 
the filename. The No Scroll key holds 
the directory listing. If the name you 
want scrolls off the screen, press Stop 
to return to the filename query before 
the directory is finished. 

Press f8 to save your work. This com- 
mand saves the entire character set. It 
requires 33 free blocks on a disk, 

Editing 

Use the cursor keys to move around 
the editing grid. The Return key 
moves the cursor down one and all the 
way left. Full wrap is supported in all di- 
rections. The Home key takes you to 
the upper left, while CIr creates a 
blank character The space bar tog- 
gles the pixel under the cursor on or 
off. The cursor doesn't advance on its 
own; you must move it yourself. 

Use C to copy the current definition 
into a buffer, and use P to paste it in 
the place of a different character. This 
is very useful in quickly getting a start 
on similar characters. Press the Control 
key and 9 simultaneously to reverse 
the bit pattern of a character. This is 
useful after pasting a character to its re- 
verse equivalent. 

The # key can be used to enter a 
character by its screen code; this is 
particularly fielpful for the comma, co- 
lon, and other characters which can't 
be entered from the 128's keyboard in- 
put routine. 

Press to access two additional op- 
tions. Here, you can copy your normal 
characters to the reverse video charac- 
ters within a set. This will save a lot of 
work! The second option lets you copy 
a range of characters from one set to 
the other. This is very flexible and fast. 

To exit SuperFont Editor, press Run/ 
Stop. A small red window just above 
the lower left info window will ask if you 
really want to exit. Press Y to confirm. 

That's It 

When you've finished creating and sav- 
ing an 8- x 16-character foni, you'll 
want to be able to load it in and select 
8x16 mode painlessly This is accom- 
plished with the Sfont.autoheader pro- 
gram, the third program in this series. 
You must append your font file to 
the end of the Sfont.autoheader, creat- 
ing a file that can be run from BASIC. 



To do this, use the following command. 

OPEN 15,DRIVE,15, "CO:RLENAHflE= 
SF0NT.AUT0HEADER,F0NTFILE":CL0SE15 

FILENAME is the resulting filename, 
and FONTFILE is whatever you named 
the font file you wish to install, Now run 
the new program. Your display will be 
set to interlaced, and the 8- x 16-char- 
acter set will be loaded into the B563S 
character memory. 

If you get the fuzzy display men- 
tioned earlier, list the program. 
Change SYS 7220.15 to SYS 7220.14 
and resave the program. Don't 
change the length of the BASIC line, or 
the program will not work. 

You may want to adjust your screen 
colors to minimize the flicker. Lowering 
the contrast and brightness settings 
can help, too, or invest in one of the 
dark Plexiglass panels to fit over your 
screen. 

That's all there is to it! Once you've 
become used to a superfont, you won't 
want to go back. You'll have to, 
though, in som.e cases. This mode is 
not compatible with programs that use 
50-row display or preview. You must dis- 
able the 8x16 characters first, by typ- 
ing SYS 5772V. SYS 65378. 

DEMO 8 X 16 

XA 50 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 -COMP 

UTER PUBLICATIONS INTL L 

TD - ALL RIGHT,9 RESERVED 

XA 130 REM 8X16 INTERLACED CHA 

RACTER DEMO BY RICK KAN 

E 
ME 110 FAST:WR=DEC ("CDCC") 
HK 120 PRINTCHRS (147)CHR$ (14) " 

8 X 16 _If^TERLACRD CHARA 

CTER DEMO" 
JP 130 PRINT: PRINT "J_F SCREEN R 

OLLS OR IS FU3ZY, PRESS 
SPACE " 
RF 140 A=15:GOSUB500:PRINT"PRE 

SS ANY OTHER KEY TO CON 

TINUE" 
AD 150 DO:GETKEYKS:IFKS<>" "TH 

EN EXIT 
KJ 160 A=15+ (A^IS) :GOSUB500:LO 

OP 
CF 173 PRINTCHR$(145)CHR.$(1'!5) 

CHRS (27) "@":GOSUB1290:S 

YS4864 
QB 139 PRINT:PRIHTCHR5 [2) "THIS 
IS THE STANDARD CHARAC 

TER SET:", -TAB (53) ; " ABCD 

EABCDE 
JJ 190 PRINTTAB (50) ; "ABCDEABCD 



RS 20a PRINT:PRINT"PRESS A KEY 

, . . ":GETKEYK$ 

DJ 220 PRINTCHRS(145)CHR5 (2) "U 

SE SUPER FOtlT EDITOR TO 

MftKE FINER CHARACTERS: 

";TABt5B) ;CHR$ {1'12) " ABC 

DEABCDE" 

BJ 230 PRINTTAB(50) ;"RBCDEABCD 

E";CHR$(14) 
QG 240 GOSOB1480 
FF 490 END 

QM 500 SYSWR,1,36:SYSWR,3,3:SY 

SWR,A,9:SYSWR,A, 11:SYSW 

R,A,23:SYSWR,A,29:RETUR 

N 

HE 1280 : 

QD 1290 A$="" :RESTORE: I=DEC{"1 

300") :READ AS:D0 until 
AS="END":POKE I,DEC(A 

$) :I = I + 1:READ A5:L00P: 

RETURN 
EX 1300 DATA 20 , 0F , 1 3 , A9 , 20 , 85 

,FA,A9,00,85,FB,85,FC, 

F0,19,A9 
MF 1310 DATA 30, 85, FA, A9, OS, 85 

,FB,8 5,FC,F0,0D,A2,12, 

20, DA, CD 
PA 1320 DATA 85, FA, E8, 20, DA, CD 

,85,FB,A5,FA,A2,12,20, 

CC,CD,E8 
QP 1330 DATA A5,FB,2!5,CC,CD,A0 

,00,20,08, CD, 99, 00, 14, 

C8,C0,08 
PS 1340 DATA 00, F5, A 5, FA, A 2, 12 

,20,CC,CD,A5,FB,E8,2O, 

CC,CD,A0 
QK 1350 DATA 00 , B9 , 00 , 14 , 20 , CA 

,CD,2a,CA,CD,CS,C0,38, 

D0,F2,E6 
ED 1360 DATA FC, A6 , FC, 00 , B 6 , $0 

,END 
FK 1480 RESTORE 1500 : SYSV-JR , 36 , 

18:SYSWR,16,19:FORI=0T 

079:READA$:SYSVIR-2,DEC 

(AS) :NEXT 
PH 1490 SYSWR, 32,18:SYSWR,16, 1 

9:FORI=0TO79:READAS:SY 

SWR-2,DEC (A5) :MnXT:RET 

URN 
PG 150f5 DATA 00,00,10, 38, 6C,C6 

,C6,FE,C6,CS,C6,C6,00, 

00,00,00 
HA 1510 DATA 00 , 90 , FC , 66 , 66 , 66 

,7C,66,66,66,66,FC,00, 

00,10,00 
QE 1520 DATA 00,00,30,66,02,00 

,C0,CO,C0,C2,66,3C,0e, 

00,00,00 
XA 1530 DATA 00 , 03 , F8 , 6C , 66 , 66 

,66,66,66, 66, 6C,F8, 00, 

00,00,00 
EG 1540 DATA 00 , 00 ,FE , 66 , 62 , 68 

, 73, 68, 60, 62, 66, FE, 00, 

00,00,00 
JX 1550 DATA 00,03,00,00,00,78 

, 0C , 7C , CC , CC , CC , 7 6 , , 



00,00,00 
HQ 1560 DATA 00 , 00 , E0 , 6 , 60 , 7 8 

,6C, 66, 66, 66, 66,70,00, 

00 ,00,00 
UP 1573 DATA 00,00,00,00,00,70 

,C6,C0,C0,C0,C6,7C,00, 

00,00,00 
BP 1580 DATA 00,00, 1C,0C,0C, 3C 

,6C,CC,CC,CC,CC,76,00, 

00,00,00 
KP 1590 DATA 00,00,00,00,00,70 

,C6,FE,C0,C0,C6,7C,00, 

00,00,00 

SUPERFONT EDITOR 

PH 190 REM COPyRIGHT 1993 - CO 
MPUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL 
LTD - ALL RIGHTS RESER 
VED 

DK 110 REM WRITTEN BY RICK KAH 
E 

HJ 120 : 

XH 130 

QH 140 

CD 150 



□ E 163 



GK 170 
BB 180 
PR 190 
GJ 200 
DO 213 



TRAP 210 

FAST:GOS 

:GOSUB39 

GOSUB122 

$:K=INST 

{SPACE}U 

ON K GOS 

20,1350, 

1040,106 

0,2120,1 

620,2330 

LOOP 

END 



UB3000:GOSU3270 

0:GOSU82010 

9:D0:D0:GETSEYK 

R(MNS,KS) :LOOP 

NTIL K 

UB 1260,1293,13 

1440,1220,1530, 

0,1120,1090,206 

850,1750,1590,1 

,1170, 1680,1380 



REM ERROR TRAP 

IF EL=1970 THEN RESUME 

(SPACE}SEXT:REM DIRECTO 

RY 

FM 220 IF EL>1759AND EL<1950TH 
EN RESUME 1920:REM LOAD 
/SAVE 

ES 230 GOSUB550:PRINTCS5LRS:IN 
PUT"EXIT Y/N";EXS:IFEXS 
<>"Y'"THEN PRINTLB$CS$:G 
OSUQ 1220:RESUHE 

AQ 240 PRINTLGSHHSHMSC.'>5E5"L"E 
S"N"; :END 

RA 250 : 

GX 270 DIHD(15) ,C (15) ,D9{15) ,C 
5(15) ,PXg(2) ,P0S(1) :WR= 
DEC C'CDCC") tRR^DECC'CDD 
A") :WH=WR-2:RH=RR-2:VD= 
15:CO=0:CS=0 

AG 289 E$=CHR$ (27) :DL$=CHR$(20 
) :IN$=CHR3(148) :RTS=CHR 
$(29) :LTS=CHRS (157) : DNS 
=CHR5 (17) :UP$=CHR${14 5) 
:CR.?=CHRS (13) :SPS=CHRS{ 
32) :HM5=CHRS(19) :CSS=CH 
R${147) 

JF 290 LCS=CHRS(14) :UC$ = CHR$ (1 
42) :UL$=CHR5(2) :U05=CHR 
$(130) :FLS=CHRS(15) :F0$ 
=CHR$ (143) :RVS=CHR$(18) 
:R0$=CHRS(14 6} :FORI=0TO 



13:RR$=RR$+RTS:NEXT 

AE 300 DB$=CHR$(31) :LR$=CHRS(1 
50) :DG$=CHR3(152) :GR$=0 
HR${153) ;LBS=OHRS(154) : 
LG$=CHR$(155) :YL$=CHRS( 
158) :CY$=CHR5(159) 

GK 313 PX${0)=LGS+SP5+CHRS (167 
) :PXS (1)=DGS+SP$+CHRS (1 
67) :FORI=0TO7:PXS (2) =PX 
S(2)+PXS (0) :NEXT:PC$ (0) 
=CHRS(155) :PC${1)=CHR$( 
152) :EW=1:CA=82 

SD 320 FORI=0TO15:CS(1)=PXS(2) 
:NEXT 

CP 330 FK$="(8 SPACES}":FORI=0 
TO1:FORK=0TO3:FS=CHR$ (1 
33+4*I+K) :KEY(I+1+2*K) , 
F9:MID$(FKS,I+1+2*K,1)= 
F$: NEXT; NEXT 

RX 340 HN5=DN$+RTS+UPS+LT$+SP$ 
+HMS+CSS+FS (0) +FKS+"CPO 
#"+RV$+CR$ 

QF 350 POKE2603,64:REM TURN ON 
CURSOR 
RETURN 



XR 360 

JJ 370 

JB 380 

FS 390 

RJ 433 



XH 410 
AC 420 



RP 430 
BB 440 
PR 450 
FA 460 
ER 470 
KB 480 



REM SCREEN SETUP 

COLOR6,7:PRINTLC$E$"M"E 

S"R"LB$HM$HMSGSS; 

WINDOW 40,1,64 ,5, 1:PRIII 

TDNSLT$"<I}'"RV$DNSLT$SP 

$DNSLTSSPSDN$LTSSPS" 

<25 I}"RO$; 

Pj^INTCYS; :WINDOW 39,1,6 

3', 4 , 1 

PRINTDN$TAB(4) "SUPER FO 

NT EDITOR": PRINTTAB (3) D 

NS"<C> 1993 COMPUTE"ES" 

L " • 

GOSUB830;GOSUB470 

RETURN 



REM EDIT WINDOW 
GOSUB760:GOSUB570 
PRINTE$"M"DB$; :IFSW THE 
N WINDOW 4,2,19,17,1 

KB 490 PRINTLG5; :WINDOW 2,1,17 
,16,EW 

AQ 503 GOSUB960:PRINTHM$LCSUO$ 



BO 510 
RB 520 
GG 530 



GK 543 

DQ 550 

RE 560 
AF 570 
KM 530 

AH 590 
BS 600 



EW=0:PRINTLG$; :RETURN 

PRINTLBS; :WINDnw 25,19, 

7 3,24:PRINTDN$LT$"{I>"R 

V$DN$LTSSP$DN$LT$SP$DN$ 

LTSSP$DN$LTSSPS"-C54 I>" 

R0$; 

PRINTLBS; :WIND0W 24,19, 

77,23:RETURN 

PRINTLBS; rWINDOW 2,19,2 

0,19: RET URN 

WINDOW 21,4,36,18 
PRINTES"M"LGSSPS"C"SP5L 
3S"il>-C0PY 
PRINTSP$RV$"'{3 I> 
PRINTLGSSPS"P"SPSLB5" 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-27 



PROGRAMS 



EJ 


640 


EB 


650 


AH 


660 


QA 


670 


ED 


680 


BQ 


693 


CG 


780 


HS 


710 



BF 


730 


XX 


740 


PK 


750 


BE 


760 


CM 


770 


CF 


780 



{I>-PASTE 
FM 610 PRINTSP$RVS"0 U 
A.J 620 PRINTLG$RT$5P$"CLR"SPSL 

BS"-fl3> 
RG 630 PRINTLG$RT$gP$ " HOME "LBS 

RV$SP$ 

PRINTSP$SPSRV$"<5 1} 

PRINTLGSSPS "SPACE" SP$LB 

$"<I}-ON/OFF 

PRINTLG$"CTRL"LB$"<CI)'"L 
G.?SP$"9"SP$LBS"{I}-REVR 
SE 

PRINTSP$RVS">{4 I}"RTS" 
a 1} 

PRINTLG$SP$"#"SP$La5" 
{I>-CHARCODE * 
PRI^JTSPSRVSES"Q{3 1} 
PRINTLGSSPS"0"SP$LB5" 
■Cl>-OPTIONS 
DB 720 PRINTSP$RVSES"Q{3 I}''RO 

S; 

RETURN 

REM INFO 

PRINTDB$; :WINDOW 4,21,1 
9,23,1 

PRINTYLS; :WINDOW 2,20,1 
7,22,1 

PRINTUOSLCSSPS"CHARACTE 
R:"SP$CHR${14 2-128*CS) S 
PSLT$LTSSPSLCS; :SYSWM,C 
OlPRINT 
ED 790 PRINTTAB(5) "CODE :";STR 
S (CO) :PRiNTTAB(6) "S^ET : 
";CS; 
RETURN 

REM MENU 

WINDOW38,6,79,24 
PRINTLG$"F1{2 SPACES)": 
PRINT"{2 SPACES}--"DG$" 
-"LB$"- FORWARD 1 CHARA 
CTER" 

SM 850 PRINTRT5DG3"F2 -"LBS"-- 
BACK 1 CHARACTER " 

JE 860 PRINTLG$"F3{2 SPACES}": 
PRINT"{2 SPACES} — "DGS" 
-"LB$"- SELECT FROM KEY 
BOARD" 

AQ 870 PRINTRTSDGS"F4 -"LB?"-- 
ALTERNATE CHARACTER SE 
T 

RX 880 PRINTLGS"F5 -"LBS"-- SE 
LECT 8/16 SCAHLINES 

DB 890 PRINTLG$"(2 SPACES} — "D 
G$"-"LB$"- "LG$"+ALT "L 
BS"- TOGGLE 16/lS 

JR 900 PRINTRTSDG$"F6 -"LB$"-- 
DOUBLE OR RESTORE S-LI 
NE FONT " 

CB 910 PRINTLGS"F7{2 SPACES}": 
PRINT"[2 SPACES}--"DG$" 
-"LB$"- LOAD FONT" 

HG 920 PRINTRT$DGS"F8 -"LB5" — 
SAVE FONT " 

MB 933 RETURN 

G-28 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



CK 


800 


KD 


810 


BD 


820 


AD 


830 


CJ 


840 



AQ 940 : 

FP 950 REM GET CHA 

HG 960 AD=DEC("200 
56+CO) :AH=I 
L=AD-256*AH 

SX 970 SYSWR,AH,18 

JX 983 F0RI=3TO15: 
(I) :NEXT 

XR 990 FORI=0TO15: 
B=7TO0STEP- 
)+PXS(-nD( 
) :NEXT 

RH 1000 PRINTRT5LT 
1+1,17,1+1 
I) ; :NEXT:P 
RETURN 



RACTSR DATA , 
0")+16* (CS*2 
NT (AD/256) :A 

:SYSWR,AL, 19 
SYSRM:RREG D 

D9 (1)="" :FOR 
l:D$(r) =D${I 
I) AND2JB) >0) 

S; : WINDOW 2, 

:PRINTUL$D$( 
RINTU05; 



DS 1010 

CA 1020 

PD 1030 

ME 1040 

JK 1050 

KF 1063 

FA 1070 

PH 1080 

HD 1090 



REM FORWARD 

C0= (CO + 1) AND255:GOSUB4 

70:GOTO1220 

REM BACK 

C0=C0-1 : IFCO<0THENCOa2 

55 

GOEUB470:GOTO1220 

REM ALT CHARSET 

CS>»-(CS = 0) :GOSUB470:GO 

SUB2910:GOTO1220 



GF 1100 
XQ 1110 
XG 1120 



REM KEYBOARD ENTRY 

PRINTYLSES"M"; ;WINDOW 

{SPACE}2,2O,17,20,1 
GS 1130 PRINTUOS" CHARACTER"CH 

RS (142-128*CS) ; JINPUTC 

HS 
FS 1140 PRINTHM3TAB(11) ": "; :SY 

SRM:RREGCO:GOSUB470:GO 

TO1220 



FK 1150 
GD 1160 
BX 1170 



REM GET CHAR CODE 
PRINTYLSE5"H"; :WINDOW 
{SPACE)2,21,17,21,1 
CX 1180 C=-1:PRINTU0$" 

{5 SPACES }C0DE "; : INPU 
TC: IFC<256ANDC>0THENCO 
=C 
GOSUB473:GOTO1220 



FJ 1190 
AP 1200 
HB 1210 
AX 1220 

GX 1230 
QS 1240 
HQ 1250 
CJ 1260 
FB 1270 
EC 1280 
ES 1290 

MB 1300 

CQ 1310 

AD 132 

DC 1330 

AP 1340 

SH 1350 

QE 1360 
GD 1370 



HK 1380 C=7:R=R+1:IFR>15THENR= 



REM HOME CURSOR 
PRINTES"M"; :WIND0W 2,1 
, 17,16:R=0:C=7 
SYSWR,64,ia:RETURN 

REM DOWN 

R=R+1:IFR>15THENR=0 

GOTO1400 

REM RIGHT 

C=C-1 : IFC<0THENC=7 : R=R 

+1: IFR>15THENR=0 

GOTO1400 

REM UP 

R=R-1:IFR<0THENR=15 

GOTO1403 

REM LEFT 

C=C+1:IFC>7THENC=0:R=R 

-1:IFR<0THENR=15 

GOTO1400 

REM RETURN KEY 



MK 1390 
KC 1400 
GX 1410 



FK 1420 
RA 1430 
QB 1440 



KF 1450 



DK 1460 
HM 1470 



JS 1480 

KA 1490 
EX 1500 
SX 1513 
GF 1520 
XD 1530 



PRINT RT$LT$; 
WINDOW 2,1+R, 17, 1+R: PR 
INT RTS LTS LEFTS (RR$, 
14-2*C) ; :RETURN 

REM TOGGLE PIXEL 

PX=-( (D (R) AMD2|C) =0) :P 

RINTUL$PX$ (PX)UOS; :G0S 

UB1410 

MIDS (D5 (R) ,22-3*C,3) =P 

X$ (PX) :D (R)=XOR (D(R) ,2 

JC) 

REM WRITE TO VOC 

AD=DEC("20O0")+R+16* (C 

S*256+CO) :AH=INT (AD/25 

6) :AL = AD-266*AH 

SYSWR, AH,18:SySWR, AL, 1 

9 

SYSWM,D{R) 

RETURN 



REM CLEAR 

AD=DEC ("2000")+16*(CS* 

256+CO) :AH=INT (AD/256) 

:AL=AD-256*AH 

JF 1540 GOSUB1220:FORI=0TO15:D 
$ (I) =PXS(2) :D(I)=0:PRI 
NTULSDS (I) ; : NEXT: PR I NT 
■U0$; 

PH 1550 SYSWR, AH, 18 :SySWR, AL,1 
9 

DF 1560 FORI=0TO15:SYSWM,D(I) : 
NEXT:GOTO1220 

RE 1570 : 

RE 1580 REM COPY 

DB 1590 GOSUB550:PRINTGR$CSSDN 
$ "COPYING. . .":FORI=0TO 
15:C5(I)=D5(I) :C(I)=D( 
I) :NEXT:PRINTLB$CS$:GO 
TO1220 



GE 1600 
AH 1610 
GE 1620 



REM PASTE 

AD=DEC("2000")+16* (CS* 
256+CO) :AH=INT (AD/256) 
: AL=AD-256*AH 

PF 1630 GOSUDl22a:FORI=0TO15:D 
5(I)=CS(I) :D(I)=C(I) :P 
RINTRT$LT5; :WIND0W2,1+ 
I ,17,1+I:PRINTUL$dS(I) 
; :NEXT 

BE 1640 SYSWR, AH, ia:SYSWR,AL,l 
9 

MD 1650 FORI=0TO15:SYSWM,D(I) : 
NEXT:GOTO1220 

EK 1660 : 

FC 1670 REM REVERSE 

HJ 1680 AD=DEC("2000")+16* (CS* 
256+CO) :AH«INT (An/256) 
:AL=AD-256*AH 

HM 1690 GOSUB122O:FORI=0TO15:D 
(I)=XOR(D(I) ,255) :DS(I 
)="":F0RB=7T0aSTEP-l:D 
$(I)=D5(I)+PX5(-((D(I) 
AND2TB) >0) ) :NEXT 



3G 1700 PRINT RT$LT$; :WINDOW 2, 
1+1,17,1+1: PRINTULSDSf 
I) ; :NEXT 

CA 1710 Sy3WR,AH,18:SYSWH,AL,l 
9 

ES 1720 FORI=0TO15:SXSWM,D(I) : 
NEXT:GOT0122a 

FR 1730 : 

HF 1740 REM SAVE 

DX 1750 PS="":GOSUB540:PRINTGR 
SCS$DN$" SAVE:": INPUT" 
FILENAME" ;FS: IF F5="" 
THEN1820 

INPUT" DEVICE S";DR:IF 
DR<80RDR>15THEN18 2CJ 
AD = DEC ("2000") :AH = INT { 
AD/256) : AL=AD-256*AH 
SirSWR,AH,18:SYSWR,AL,l 
9 

OPEN 2,DH,2,F$+",U,W": 
A=DS:A5=DSS:IFATHENiei 


SYSDEC("1386") 
CLOSE2:PRINTA$:SLEEP2 
GOSUB2010:GOTO1220 



BH 1760 
SR 1770 
HM 1780 
BD 1790 



PH 1800 
EJ 1810 
JD 1320 
JE 1830 
EA 1840 
PE 1850 



SF 1860 

GF 1370 

DG 1380 
KE 1890 

JA 1900 

QX 1910 
FA 1920 

SP 1930 

XP 1940 
JQ 1950 
DX 1960 



MR 1970 
GX 1980 
QX 1990 
KF 2000 
GR 2010 



REM LOAD 

GOSUB54 0:F$="":DR=0:PR 
INTGRSCSSDbJ$" LOAD ; ": 
INPUT" DEVICE #";DR:IF 
DR<80RDR>15THEN193 
PRINTDN$"ENTER '$' FOR 
DIRECTORY"UPSUP$:INPU 
T"FONT FILE TO LOAD";F 
$ 

IF F5="S"THEN GOSUB196 
0:GOTO1853:ELSE IF F$= 
""THEM 1930 

AD=DECC"2000") :AH=INT( 
AD/256) :AL=AD-256*AH 
PRINTES"M"; :GOSUB2010: 
SYSWR,AH,18:SYSWR,AL, 1 
9 

OPEN 2,DR,2,FS:A=DS:D? 
=DS$:IFATHEN1920 
SYSDEC ("1366") 
CL0SE2:PRINTHM$LH$D?; : 
SLEEP2 

EW=l:GOSUB39a:GOSUB20I 
a:GOTO1220 

REM DIRECTORY 

PRINTDBS; :WINDOW 51,1, 

78,18,1:PRINTYL$E$"L"; 

;WINDOW 49,0,76,17,1:P 

RINTLRS" £RESS NO SCRO 

LL TO PAUSE"E$"Q"YL$CR 

SE5"T" 

CATALOG ON U(DR) 

RETURN 



REM DISPLAY CHARSET 
GOSUB5 30:PRINTLG$CHR$ ( 
142-128*CS) ;CSS; 
MA 2020 FORI=0TO4: PRIHTSP5; :F0 
RJ = 0TO51:SYSWM, (J + 51*I 
) AND 2 55: NEXT: PRINTCR3; 



FA 2030 
DA 2040 
ER 2050 



;NEXT 

PRINTLC$; : RETURN 



REM TOGGLB 8/16 SCANLI 

NE SCREEN 
ME 20S0 IF VR=1AND (PEEK(211)A 

ND8)>0 THEN VD=14-(VD» 

14) :GOTO2083 
FQ 2070 IF VR THEN 2090 
DH 2083 VR=1:SYSWR,1, 36:SYSWR, 

3,8:SYSWR, VD,9:SYSWR,V 

D,11:SYSWR,VD,23:SYSWR 

,VD,29:RETURN 
BP 2090 VR=0:SYSWR,0,8:SYSWR,7 

,9:SYSWR,7, 11:SYSWR,7, 

23:SYSWR,7,29:RETURN 
BD 2100 : 
SF 2110 REM DOUBLE CHARACTER D 

ATA SIZE 
QH 2120 GOSUB543:PRINTYLSCS5DN 

S" SELECT : "RV5'"D"R0S 

" - DOUBLE 1ST EIGHT L 

INES" :PRINTTAB (10) RV?" 

R"ROS" - RESTORE SYSTE 

M FONT": PRINT" 

{2 SPACES }flNY OTHER KE 

Y ABORTS. . . " 
DC 2130 GETKEYK$: IFK$="R"THENG 

OSUB2010:SYSDEC("FF62" 

) :GOTO2200 
BS 2140 IFKS<>"D"THEN GOSUB201 

0:GOTO2200 

GOSUB2010 

SYSDEC ("1300") 

GOSUB470:GOTO1220 



BM 2180 
GB 2190 
DR 2290 
XB 2310 
AB 2320 
CE 2330 



REM OPTIONS 

GOSUB540 : PRINTLGSCSSVL 
S" OPTIONS :"LGS 
BR 2340 PRI¥TTAB{10) RV$"R"ROS" 

- COPY NORMAL TO "RV$ 
"BEVERSE"RO$" CHARACTE 
RS" 

BX 2350 PRINTTAB{10)RV$"T"ROS" 

- TRANSFER BETWEEN CH 
ARACTER SETS" 

JC 2360 GETKEYKS: IFK$<>"R"ANDK 

$<>"T"THEN GOSUB2010:G 

OTO2380 
KQ 237Q 0NINSTR("RT",K$)G0SUS2 

410,2510 

GOTO1220 



PH 2380 
HH 2390 
MJ 2400 

RJ 2410 
DQ 2420 



QF 2430 
KP 2440 
JA 2450 



REM CO 

DEO CH 

G0SUB2 

FO RCO = 

000")+ 

H=INT ( 

6* AH 

SYSWR, 

9 

FORI=0 

{SPACE 

AD=DEC 

256+CO 

256) :A 



PY TO REVERSE VI 

ARSET 

010 

0TO127:AD=DEC{"2 

16*(CS*256+CO) :A 

AD/256) : AL=AD-25 

AH,18:SYSWR,AL,1 

T015:SYSRM:HREG 
}D(I) :NEXT 
("2000")+16*{CS* 
+128) :AH=INT (AD/ 
L=AD-256*AH 



XE 248 
RS 2490 
RM 2500 



HD 2460 SYSWR,AH, 13 :SYSWR,AL, 1 

9 
AK 2470 FORI = 0TO15:SYf5WM,XOR(D 

(I) ,255) :NEXT 

NEXT: RETURN 

REM TRANSFER BETWEEN C 

HARSETS 
SB 2510 GOSUB540:PRINTLG$CS$"T 

RANSFER BETWEEN CHARAC 

TER S^ETS":INPUT"S^OURCE 
S^ET";S:IFS<0ORS>1THEN 

2610 
KM 2520 INPUT"FIRST SOURCE COD 

E";FC: IFFC<0ORFC>255TH 

EK2010 
SX 2530 INPUT" LAST ^OURCE COD 

E";LC:IFLC<FCORLC>255T 

HEN2010 
XH 2540 INPUT"1ST DESTINATION 

{SPACElCODE";DC:IFDC<0 

0RDO25 5-LC-FCTHENPRIN 

TUP$E$"Q"; :GOTO2540 
XM 2550 CG = - (S = 0) :GOSUS201fl 
XS 2560 SA=DEC("2000") +16* (3*2 

56 + FC) : SH = INT {SA/256) : 

SL=SA-256*SH 
FE 2570 DA=DEC("2003") +16* (CS* 

256 + DC) :DH- I NT {DA/2 56) 

:DL=DA-256*DH 
JC 2580 SYSWR, DH,18:SYSWR,DL,1 

9 
KK 2590 SYSRR, ,24:RREGA:SYSWR, 

A OR128,24:SYSWR,SH,32 

:SYSWR,SL,33 
BH 2600 FORI= FC TO LC:SYSWR,1 

6, 30; NEXT 
HC 2610 RETURN 
BF 3000 RESTORE:I=4364:DO:READ 

AS: IFA$="END" THEN EXI 

T 
AE 3010 POKEI ,DEC (AS) :I=I+1:L0 

OP:RETURN 
HC 3020 DATA 20 , 0F , 1 3 , A9 , 20 , 8 5 

,FA,A9,00,35,FB,3 5,FC, 

F0,19,A9 
CJ 3030 DATA 30, 35, FA, A9, 00, 85 

,FB,85,FC,F0,0D,A2,12, 

20, DA, CD 
JE 3040 DATA 35 , FA,E8 , 20 , DA,CD 

,85,FB,A5,FA,A2,12,20, 

CC,CD,E8 
CQ 3050 DATA A5 , FB , 20 ,CC , CD , AO 

,00,20,08, CD, 99, 30, 04, 

C8,C0,a8 
JC 3060 DATA D0,FS,A5,FA, A2,12 

,20,CC,CD,A5,FB,E8,20, 

CC,CD,A0 
RC 3070 DATA 00,B9,00,04,20,CA 

,CD,20,CA,CD,C8,C0,08, 

D0,F2,E6 
JB 3080 DATA FC, A6 , FC, 00,86 , 60 

,A2,0a,36,FB,86,FA,A2, 

2,20,C6 
XQ 3090 DATA FF,20,CF,FF, 2a,CA 

,CD,E6,FA,D0,F6,E6,FB, 

A6,FB,E0 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-29 



PROGRAMS 



MF 3100 DATA 20,90,EE,4C,CC,FF 

,A2,00,86,FB,86,Ffi,A2, 

02,20,C9 
JQ 3110 DATA FF,2fl,D8,CD,20,D2 

,FF,E6,FA,D0,F6,E6,FB, 

A 6 , FB , E 
DD 3129 DATA 23, 90 ,EE , 4C,CC , FF 

AUTOHEADER.MAKER 

PK 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COMP 
UTS PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
FQ 10 REM SUPERFONT AUTOHEADER 

MAKER 
FP 20 IMPUT "DESTINATION DEVIC 
E";DD: 1FDD<8ORDD>30THEN2 

AC 30 0PSN2,DD,2,"SF0NT.AUT0HE 

ADER,P,W" 
JF 40 RESTORE:DO:READ A$:IFAS= 

"END"THEN EXIT 
ES 50 PRINTt2,CHR5 (DEC (AS) ) ; :L 

OOP 
KX 60 FORI=3T0112:PBINT#2,CHR$ 

(96) ; :NEXT:CL0SE2 
GB 1000 DATA 01, IC, 31,1C,0A,00 
,9E,37,32,32,30,2C,31, 
35,3A,8F 
MQ 1010 DATA 20,53,55,50,45,52 
,46,4F,4E,54,20,41,55, 
54,4F,4C 
GS 1020 DATA 4F, 41, 44, 20,23,43 
,29,20,52,49,43,48,20, 
4B,41,4E 
AH 1330 DATA 45 , 00 , 00, 00 , 00 , AA 
, AD, 30,03,48,09,31,80, 
30,D0,aA 
GJ 1940 DATA 48,A2,24,A9,01,2O 
,CC,CD,A2,0B,A9,G3,20, 
CC,CD,'J8 
AG 1059 DATA A2, 09 , 20 ,CC,CD, A2 
,0B,20,CC,CD,A2,17,20, 
CC,CD,A2 
CS 1960 DATA 1D,20,CC,CD,A2,13 
,A9,0a,20,CC,CD,CA,A9, 
20,20,CC 
KR 1070 DATA CD , A9 , ID, 85 ,FB , A9 
,00,85,FA,A0,00,B1,FA, 
20,CA,CD 
PP 1080 DATA Ca,D0,F8,E6,FB,A5 
,FB,C9,3D,D0,F0,68,8D, 
30,00, 60, END 

Rick Kane is ttie author of I Paint, a 
trademark of Living Proof, Ltd. 



SCRIPT FIX 



By Rick Kane 

If you looked at the previous article on Su- 
per Screen Fonts, you know hovi^ this en- 
hanced Character mode can sharpen the 
onscreen text of a 128 from 8x8 pixels 
to 8 X 16 pixels. Wouldn't it be great to 
take advantage of this enhanced mode 

G-30 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



when using SpeedScrlpt 128. COM- 
PUTE'S word processing program? You 
can with Script Fix and Super Screen 
Fonts. 

Script Fix is written in BASIC. To help 
avoid typing errors, enter it with The Au- 
tomatic Proofreader. See "Typing Aids" 
elsewhere in this section. Be sure to 
save the program before you attempt to 
run it. 

Modifying SpeedScript 

When you run Script Fix, it will ask for 
a copy of SpeedScript 128 to load and 
modify. If you already use one of the 
SpeedScript enhancement programs 
such as SpeedSpell, start with an un- 
modified version of SpeedScript, If the 
patch program doesn't find the expect- 
ed bytes where the patch goes, it will 
abort. If it is successful, Script Fix will 
ask for a filename for the modified ver- 
sion. The program will suggest adding 
SF to the source file's name, truncating 
it if it's longer than 16 characters. 

When all done, run your installation 
program to set up the 8x16 charac- 
ters. Then run the modified 
SpeedScript. It's beautiful! 

SpeedScript with superfonts should 
be compatible with other add-ons to 
SpeedScript 128, especially if they are 
installed after the superfont fix. There is 
one certain caveat; Don't try to use the 
50-row mode of SpeedSpell, or your 
screen wiil turn to garbage, 



FIX 

REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COM 

PUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL L 

TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

DV=PEEK(186) :iFDV<8THEN 

DV=8 

GRAPHIC CLR:G=RGR(a) :GR 
APHIC llGRAPHIC G 
TRAP 265:PRINTCHRS (147) 
"SPEEDSCRIPT 128 : SUPE 
RFOHT FIX" 

F$="SPEEDSCRIPT 128" 
PRIHT "LOAD FILENAME 
{2 SPACES}"+F$+CHRS(27) 
+ "J";TAB (13) ; : iNPtJT N$ 

PRINT "FROM DEVICF " ; DV 
;CHR5 (27) "J";TAB (11) ; : I 
NPUT FD 

IF FD<8 OR FD>30 THEN 1 
50 

SFS=LSFT$(MS,13)+".SF" 
PRINT "LOADING. . . ":BLOAD 
(K$) ,B0,P(DEC("1C01") ) 
IFPEEK(174)+PEEK(175)*2 
56013578 THEN PRINT"I 



GJ 


(in 

59 


PX 


133 


CQ 


110 


HH 


120 


HX 


139 


JQ 


140 


XH 


150 


PF 


160 


CB 


170 


XQ 


180 


GB 


190 



RK 


200 


XA 


210 


FK 


220 


HE 


230 



KQ 240 



(SPACE} DON'T KNOW THI."; 
{3PACE}VERSI0N!":GRAPHI 
CCLH:END 

PRINT"PATCHING. . . ":REST 
ORE:D0:KEAD ADR:IF ADR< 
THEN EXIT 

READ BYTES :F0RI= 0TO BY 
TES:READ WAS, IS: IF PEEK 
(ADR+I)<>WAS THEN 280 
POKE ADR+I , IS:NEXT:LOOP 
PRINT"S^UCCES.SFUL! " : PRIN 
T "S_AVE FILENAME 
(2 SPACES)"+SF$-CHRS (27 
)+"J";TAB (13) ; :INPUT NS 
PRINT "TO DEVICE ";FD;C 
HRS (27) "J";TAB(9) ; :1NPU 
T TD 

IF TD<8 OR TD>30 THEN 2 
40 

PRINT"SAVIHG. . . ";BSAVE( 
NS) ,B0,P(7169)TO P(1357 
8) ,U (TD) 

if ds then printdss 
graphicclr:end 
print'mjnexpected bytes 
{spaceTfoundi":Graphicc 

LR;END 

DATA 7182,0,32,44 

DATA 7862,8,120,32,169, 

86,1,224,141,32,4,0,13, 

192,76,108,83,0,250,10 

DATA -1 



Rick Kane is an independent video 
and film cameraman who lives in Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. 



ED 


250 


HJ 


260 


XH 


265 


EG 


270 


DR 


280 


BJ 


290 


JK 


300 


PK 


310 



DOUBLE SIZE 



By Rick Kane 

Here's another program in which the 8 x 
16 characters can be used on a 128. Be 
sure to Start reading the Super Screen 
Fonts program in this issue for fuli details. 

In noninterlaced mode, the 8 x 16 char- 
acters are twice as tall as regular charac- 
ters. In combination with pixel double- 
width mode, they can be made twice as 
wide as weli. The end result is a screen 
40 characters wide and 12 characters 
tall. 

This added size might be useful for in- 
store advertising displays, giving your 
eyes a rest while programming, or allow- 
ing everyone to sit back instead of hud- 
dling around the monitor at computer 
club meetings! 

Double Size is written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter it 
with The Automatic Proofreader, See "Typ- 
ing Aids" elsewhere in this section. Be 
sure to save a copy of the program be- 
fore you attempt to run it. 



Bigger Text 

If you run Double Size without first in- 
stalling an 8 X 16 character set creat- 
ed from Super Font, you'll get the stan- 
dard characters with double line spac- 
ing — a result which might have some us- 
es of its own. Normally, you'll want to in- 
stall your favorite set or create one 
especially for use in double-size 
mode. 

This program is compatible with the 
screen editor as long as you don't de- 
fine a new window or undefine the win- 
dow by pressing Home twice. Your BA- 
SIC programs, program listings, and 
directories will work normally Again, re- 
set to normal by typing SYS 57721: 
SYS 65378. 

Beyond Big 

These techniques aren't limited to 8 x 
16 characters. You could easily define 
characters that are 8 x 9, 8 x 12, or 
even 8 x 5 if you wanted. You'd have 
to adjust the total number of screen 
rows displayed (8563 registers 4, 6, 7, 
and 9 particularly} according to your 
needs. 

With a little more difficulty you can 
go beyond 16, up to 8- x 32-pixel char- 
acters! Above 16, though, character 
memory is handled differently. The sys- 
tem automatically allocates 16 bytes 
per character for any character set 8 x 
16 or smaller. Above that, it switches to 
32 bytes per character, so you need to 
reposition the start of each definition at 
32-byte intervals, instead of 16-byte in- 
tervals. Also, note that one 256-byte 
character set now tal<es 8192 bytes. 
This means that for all practical purpos- 
es, you can use only one character set 
if you want to have any memory for dis- 
play and attributes! 

To try out even larger text, type in Be- 
yond Big. It is also written in BASIC 
and should be entered with The Auto- 
matic Proolreader. 

Save the program and then run it. Be- 
yond Big asks for an 8 x 16 superfont 
file to read. Then it asks which charac- 
ter set to use. Character set is upper- 
case/graphics, and set 1 is uppercase/ 
lowercase. The file is read and then 
automatically doubled for 8- x 32-pix- 
el characters. 

Then the screen is set for a 40-col- 
umn by 6-row screen! That's not a lot 
of space, but, as usual, the screen edi- 



tor works normally. Colors, blink, under- 
line, and so on are all available for scroll- 
ing, crawling text, or other clever (and 
big) displays. 

DOUBLE SIZE 

BM REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COUP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

QH 10 REM DOUBLE HIGH/WIDE USI 
NG SXlfi & PIXEL DOUBLE W 
IDTH 

GG 2G REM BY RICK KANE 

EH laa WR=DEC ("CDCC") 

RJ 113 SYS WR.ie.liSYS WR,15,7 
:SYS WR,12,6:S¥S Wt?,15, 
9:SYS WR, 15,23:SYS WR, 
15,11:SYS WR,15,29:SYSW 
R,0,8:REH HEIGHT 

AQ 129 SYSWR, 64+16+7, 25:3YSWR, 
6 3,0:SY.9WR,40,1:SYSWR, 5 
3,2:SYSWR,137,22:SYSWR, 
43,27:3YSWR,6 3,3 4 :SYSWR 
,52, 35: REM WIDTH 

QC 130 PRINT"{2 HOME} {CLR}":WI 
NDOW 0,0,39,11 

BEYOND BIG 

DJ a REM COPYRIGHT L993 - COHP 
UTE PUBLICATONS INTL LTD 
{SPACE}- ALL RIGHTS RESER 
VED 
JK 10 REM 8X32 PIXEL CHARACTER 

S 
GG 20 REM BY RICK KANE 
CC 30 RR = DEC("CDDA") :WR=DEC ("C 

DCC") 
XG 40 GOSUB1O00 
SG 50 INPUT"DEVICE";DV:IFDV<80 

RDV>30THEN50 
SR 60 INPUT"FONT FILE";F$ 
XQ 70 INPUT"WHICH CHARACTER SE 

T";CS:IFCS THEN CS=1 

QK 130 OPEN2,8,2,PS:SYSDEC{"CD 

CC") ,32, 18:SYSDEC ("CDCC 

") ,3,19:SYS4864,CS:CLOS 

E2 

AX 110 SYSWR,31,9:SYSVJR, 31,23: 

SYSWR,31,H:SYSWR, 31,29 

iSYSWR, 6,6;SYSWR, 8,7: 

SYSWR, 8, 4: REM SET 32 P 

IXEL NON INTERLACED 

DF 120 SYSWR, 64+16+7, 25:SYSWR, 

6 3,0: SYSWR, 4 0,1; SYSWR, 5 

3, 2: SYSWR, 137, 22: SYSWR, 

40, 27: SYSWR, 63, 34 : SYSWR 

,52,35:REM DOUBLE VJIOTH 

MP 130 PRINT" {2 HOME} {CLR}":WI 

NDOW 0,0, 3 9, 5: END 
HX 1000 RESTORE: I=4866:DO:READ 
h$: IFA$="END" THEN EXI 
T 
RJ 1010 POKEI,DEC(A$) :I=I+1:L0 

OP: RETURN 
XP 1020 DATA C9,00,F0,1A,A2,90 
,a6,FB,86,FA,A2,02,20, 



ce,FF,20 
BS 1030 DATA CF,FF,E6,i?A,D0,F9 

,E6,FB,A6,FB,E0, 10,90, 

F1,A2,00 
BC 1040 DATA 86,FB,a6,FA,A2,02 

,23,C6,FF,20,CF,FF,48, 

20,CA,CD 
AD 1050 DATA 6B ,20,CA,CD,E6,FA 

,D0 ,F1,E6,FB, A6,F3,E0, 

10,90,E9 
XR 1060 DATk 4C,CC,FF,END 

Rick Kane has been programming 64s 
and 128s since 1983. 



VERTISCROLL 



By Daniel English 

We've all seen programs that scroll text 
along the bottom of the screen or inside 
the screen's border. '\/ertiScroll is a pro- 
gram for the 64 that takes this idea to an- 
other extreme by allowing a message to 
scroll smoothly down the left side of the 
screen. The scrolling message won't in- 
terfere with any text, character, or 
bitmap display 

As you may have guessed, the tetters 
in the scroll are created with sprites. 
What you may not have guessed is that 
the entire message uses only a single 
sprite. The remaining seven sprites are un- 
affected by VertiScroll. VertiScroll efficient- 
ly uses the 64's raster interrupt feature to 
create its effects. You'll find that a 
smooth scrolling vertical message can en- 
hance many programs. 

Getting Started 

VertiScroll consists of three programs: 
two machine language programs and 
a BASIC one. Of the two machine lan- 
guage files, one is a code file and one 
a sprite file. To enter them, use MLX, 
COMPUTE'S machine language entry 
program. See "Typing Aids" elsewhere 
in this section. To enter VS.Code, re- 
spond with the following starting and 
ending addresses when MLX 
prompts. 

Starting address: 4000 
Ending address: 4217 

To enter VS. Letters, respond with the 
following starting and ending address- 
es when MLX prompts. 

Starting address: 5000 
Ending address: 5CC7 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-31 



PROGRAMS 



The third program, VertiScroll, is the 
text editor. Since it is written in BASIC, 
use The Automatic Proofreader to 
help avoid typing errors. Again, see 
"Typing Aids." All three files should be 
saved to the same disk. Be sure to 
save the programs with the filenames 
as listed, since the VertiScroll editor 
searches for and loads these files. 

The Editor 

To do a quick test of VertiScroll, load 
the editor and type RUN^ You will then 
be instructed to press the space bar to 
enter the text editor. When the screen 
clears, you may begin entering your 
message. All letters, numbers, and 
most punctuation are available. 

When typing, don't attempt to wrap 
words from one screen line to the otti- 
er; let them cut off. They will be con- 
tinuous in the scroll. You may use a 
maximum of 12 lines. 

W/hen you have finished entering 
your message, end it with the @ sym- 
bol. This tells the computer when to re- 
peat the message. When you press Re- 
turn, your message will be stored. 

Going Vertical 

When your scroll has been stored, you 
have a chance to preview your mes- 
sage as it will appear. You will then be 
prompted to either edit your message 
or save it to disk. 

After your message has been 
saved on disk, it's ready to be used in 
your own program. All you need to do 
is have your program load VS. LET- 
TERS, VS. CODE, and your message. 

The command to begin scrolling is 
SYS 16384, To disable the scrolling, en- 
ter SYS 16387. Don't press Run/Stop 
and Restore to disable the scroll, be- 
cause this will crash the computer. 

Custom Letters 

VertiScroll was designed to be custom- 
ized. The sprite data is stored in bank 
1 , at $5000, You can edit all of the let- 
ters, numbers, and punctuation using 
a sprite editor, 

Once the scroll has been installed us- 
ing the command SYS 16384. you can 
change the color, size, and location of 
the message, Changing the values for 
the sprite registers will change the en- 
tire scroti. For example, to move the 
scrolling text to the middle of the 

G-32 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



screen, try POKE 53248,150. 

You can change colors by altering 
the sprite color registers. See the table 
at the end of the article for a list of 
POKES. 

The default location for the text is at 
$4220. If you want to put your text some- 
where else, POKE 16076, HI: POKE 
1607B,LO will change the pointer. You 
will also need to change ihe start and 
end in line 40 of the editor. Remember, 
there is still a 12-line (480 character) 
maximum. 

When you enter SYS 16384, all graph- 
ic data including the text screen is 
moved to bank 1. When you disable 
the scroll, the data is restored to bank 
0. The letters scroll independently, leav- 
ing the computer free for other tasks. 
Whether you're writing business soft- 
ware or just playing games, VertiScroil 
will create a dazzling display. 

VertiScroll POKEs 

Here are a list of POKEs that you 
might want to use to customize your on- 
screen message. 



X— I 



POKE 53248 
right 

POKE 53264, 1- 
255th X position 
POKE 53269, 0- 
POKE 53269, 1- 
POKE 53275, 1- 
screen text 
POKE 53275, 
screen text 
POKE 53287, X- 
scroll message 
POKE 53285, X- 
color 

POKE 53286 
POKE 53277 
POKE 53277 



X- 
1- 
0- 



Move scroll left and 

-Move scroll beyond 

-Hide letters 
-Show letters 
-Display scroll under 

-Display scroll over 

-Change first color of 

-Change second 

-Change last color 
-Double width scroll 
-Normal width scroll 



VS.CODE 

4000: -10 
4008:A9 
4310:AD 
4018:0^ 
4020:15 
4028:12 
4B30:aD 
4038:D0 
4n40:5ft 
4043:8D 
4050:D0 
4058:CA 
4060:03 
4068:06 



9D 41 4C 
01 3D 19 

06 40 C9 
F0 27 AD 
8D 01 D3 
D0 20 B5 

07 40 8D 
8D 12 D3 
40 AD 01 
01 D0 8D 
20 B5 43 
4 AD 0D 
4C 31 EA 
40 hD 06 



78 40 
00 20 

00 F0 

01 D0 
3D 03 
40 4C 
01 DO 
23 B5 
D3 18 
03 D0 
20 CA 
DC 29 
4C BC 
40 C9 



00 26 E5 
67 40 F6 
19 C9 4D 
13 69 7E 
D0 8D 63 
5A 43 6D 
an 3 3 9 3 
40 4C 78 
69 15 92 
8D 12 4B 
43 20 C8 

01 F3 53 
FE EE SC 
OB F3 42 



4070 


01 


60 


A9 


00 


80 


06 


43 


60 


24 


4078 


A9 


00 


8D 


15 


D0 


78 


A9 


31 


BD 


4080 


8D 


14 


03 


A9 


EA 


8D 


15 


03 


82 


4088 


A9 


81 


8D 


0D 


DC 


A9 


00 


3D 


DB 


4090 


lA 


D0 


8D 


0D 


DC 


A9 


IB 


8D 


26 


4098 


11 


D0 


58 


A9 


15 


8D 


18 


DO 


5B 


40A0 


A9 


C7 


8D 


00 


DD 


A9 


3F 


BD 


3B 


40A8 


02 


DO 


A9 


04 


80 


88 


02 


A9 


53 


40B0 


93 


20 


D2 


FF 


60 


AC 


06 


40 


5F 


40B8 


B9 


BF 


40 


8D 


F8 


47 


63 


40 


cc 


40C0 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


40 


49 


40 


41 


40Ca 


40 


40 


EE 


07 


40 


AD 


07 


40 


CE 


40D0 


C9 


3B 


F0 


01 


60 


A9 


26 


30 


B6 


40D8 


07 


40 


A0 


00 


B9 


BF 


40 


99 


B7 


40E0 


A7 


02 


C8 


CO 


0A 


D0 


F5 


A0 


FA 


40E8 


00 


B9 


A7 


02 


99 


C0 


40 


C8 


06 


40F0 


C0 


0A 


00 


F5 


A0 


00 


Bl 


02 


38 


40F8 


AA 


E0 


00 


FO 


44 


E0 


IB 


93 


82 


4100 


11 


E0 


23 


90 


15 


E0 


3C 


98 


E5 


4108 


19 


E0 


3F 


F0 


ID 


A2 


58 


4C 


B6 


4110 


2F 


41 


8A 


18 


59 


53 


AA 


4C 


9B 


4118 


2F 


41 


8A 


18 


69 


20 


AA 


4C 


C2 


4120 


2F 


41 


8A 


18 


69 


IC 


AA 


4C 


BA 


4128 


2F 


41 


A2 


58 


4C 


2F 


41 


8A 


98 


4130 


8D 


BF 


40 


A5 


02 


18 


69 


01 


10 


4138 


85 


02 


A5 


03 


69 


00 


35 


03 


3C 


4140 


63 


A0 


42 


A2 


20 


86 


02 


84 


31 


4148 


03 


60 


AD 


0E 


DC 


29 


FE 


8D 


12 


4150 


0E 


DC 


A5 


01 


29 


FB 


85 


01 


IB 


4158 


A0 


D0 


A2 


00 


36 


FA 


84 


FB 


08 


4160 


A0 


43 


A2 


00 


86 


FC 


34 


FD 


C8 


4168 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FA 


91 


FC 


A5 


FA 


E7 


4170 


18 


69 


01 


35 


FA 


A5 


FB 


69 


Al 


4178 


00 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


13 


69 


01 


52 


4180 


85 


FC 


A5 


FD 


69 


00 


85 


FD 


ED 


4138 


A5 


FD 


C9 


50 


D0 


DA 


AS 


0i 


D9 


4190 


09 


04 


85 


01 


AD 


0E 


DC 


09 


CI 


4198 


01 


8D 


0E 


DC 


60 


A9 


00 


8D 


C5 


41A0 


15 


D0 


8D 


IB 


D0 


A9 


01 


8D 


02 


41R3 


IC 


00 


A9 


lA 


80 


00 


D0 


A9 


FB 


41B0 


00 


8D 


10 


00 


A9 


01 


8D 


27 


39 


41B8 


D0 


A9 


90 


8D 


25 


D0 


A9 


05 


4D 


41C0 


80 


26 


00 


A9 


C6 


BD 


00 


00 


92 


41C8 


A9 


3F 


80 


02 


00 


A9 


44 


80 


6D 


41D0 


88 


02 


A9 


93 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


7C 


41D8 


40 


A0 


00 


99 


BF 


40 


C8 


03 


3E 


41E0 


0B 


00 


F8 


20 


41 


41 


20 


4A 


07 


41E8 


41 


A9 


13 


80 


18 


D3 


78 


A9 


50 


41F0 


IB 


8D 


11 


D0 


A9 


01 


8D 


lA 


lA 


41F8 


00 


A9 


FF 


ao 


06 


43 


A9 


08 


B3 


4200 


8D 


14 


03 


A9 


40 


8D 


15 


03 


B0 


4208 


A9 


7F 


80 


00 


DC 


58 


A9 


01 


60 


4210 


BD 


15 


D3 


60 


33 


00 


00 


00 


C0 


VS.LETTERS 
















5000 


30 


00 


00 


30 


30 


30 


00 


00 


A0 


5008 


33 


03 


03 


98 


03 


33 


00 


00 


A8 


5010 


.33 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


90 


03 


80 


5018 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


B8 


5020 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


5028 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


C8 


5330 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


D0 


5038 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


30 


00 


00 


08 


5340 


:30 


30 


00 


30 


30 


00 


00 


80 


E0 


5048 


:0O 


30 


00 


30 


33 


03 


00 


30 


E8 


5050 


:80 


03 


00 


00 


03 


A0 


30 


30 


73 


5058 


:AA 


40 


00 


AA 


55 


00 


0A 


55 


ID 


5060 


:3F 


00 


15 


3F 


00 


00 


3F 


03 


B5 


5068 


:0O 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


09 



507B 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


11 


52A0 


FF 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


00 


30 


09 


54D0- 


00 


00 


AA 


50 


00 


AA 


55 


00 


29 


5078 


:0a 


00 


00 


00 


03 


30 


00 


00 


19 


52A8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


4D 


54D8- 


AA 


55 


F0 


A0 


55 


FF 


A0 


05 


45 


5380 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


33 


00 


00 


00 


21 


52B0 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


55 


54E0- 


FF 


A0 


00 


FF 


A0 


00 


0F 


A0 


75 


5388 


:00 


00 


30 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


29 


52B8 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


33 


5D 


54E8- 


00 


00 


A0 


00 


00 


A0 


00 


08 


28 


5093 


:00 


00 


30 


30 


30 


A8 


00 


00 


D3 


52C0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


30 


66 


54F0- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


99 


5098 


:AA 


00 


00 


AA 


33 


00 


00 


00 


39 


5 2C8 


00 


A0 


00 


00 


A8 


00 


00 


AA 


85 


54F8: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


Al 


50Aa 


:a0 


00 


00 


00 


AA 


00 


00 


A A 


41 


52D0 


00 


00 


2A 


40 


00 


0A 


50 


30 


87 


5500 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


AA 


50A8 


:00 


00 


A8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


5E 


5208 


02 


54 


00 


00 


55 


00 


00 


15 


53 


5508 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


01 


FO 


2A 


13 


50B0 


:00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


51 


52E0 


C0 


00 


05 


F0 


00 


01 


FC 


30 


93 


5510: 


45 


FC 


2A 


55 


FC 


A3 


55 


FF 


6C 


53B8 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


59 


52E8 


00 


FF 


30 


00 


3F 


00 


00 


3F 


96 


5513 


A8 


14 


3F 


AO 


14 


OF 


A0 


14 


40 


50C3 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


61 


52F0 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


F5 


5520 


0F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A8 


14 


OF 


A8 


4A 


50C8 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


69 


52F8 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


9D 


5528 


55 


3F 


2A 


55 


FF 


2A 


41 


FC 


10 


50D0 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


71 


5303 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


A6 


5530 


0A 


00 


F0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


FD 


50D8 


:2A 


00 


00 


AA 


40 


03 


A8 


40 


CC 


5308 


00 


00 


30 


00 


0A 


55 


F0 


2A 


60 


5538 


fc0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


E2 


50E0 


:00 


20 


40 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


91 


5310 


55 


FC 


2A 


55 


FC 


AA 


40 


3F 


8D 


5540 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


EA 


50E8 


:0O 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


89 


5318 


A2 


50 


OF 


A0 


54 


OF 


A0 


15 


45 


5548 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


55 


F0 


2A 


A4 


50F0 


:00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


33 


03 


30 


91 


5320 


0F 


AO 


05 


CF 


A0 


01 


FF 


A3 


C5 


5550 


55 


FC 


AA 


55 


FC 


A8 


15 


3F 


83 


50F8 


:00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


99 


5323 


00 


FF 


2A 


55 


FF 


2A 


55 


FC 


B9 


5558 


AS 


14 


3F 


A0 


14 


0F 


AO 


14 


80 


5133 


:00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A 2 


5330 


0A 


55 


F0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


4F 


5560 


0F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A8 


14 


3F 


AA 


EC 


5108 


:03 


30 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


03 


AA 


5338 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


DE 


5568 


54 


3F 


2A 


50 


FC 


2A 


50 


FC 


85 


5110 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


B2 


5340 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


E6 


5570 


0A 


40 


F0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


4E 


5118 


:80 


00 


03 


A3 


00 


0F 


2A 


55 


4B 


5348 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


0D 


5578- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


23 


5123 


:FC 


0A 


55 


F3 


00 


00 


30 


30 


7D 


5 3 50 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


3F 


42 


5580 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


2B 


3128 


;00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


CA 


5 3 58 


AA 


55 


FF 


AA 


55 


FF 


AA 


55 


A9 


5588 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


33 


5130 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


D2 


5360 


FF 


28 


00 


0F 


03 


00 


0F 


33 


63 


5590 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


3B 


5138 


t00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


03 


00 


DA 


5368 


00 


OF 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


OF 


5A 


5598 


0A 


41 


F0 


OA 


41 


F0 


0A 


41 


7A 


5140 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E2 


5370 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


17 


55A0 


F0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


C3 


5148 


.00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


EA 


5378 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


IF 


55A8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


53 


5150 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F2 


5380 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


27 


55B0 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


5B 


5158 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


55 


F0 


2A 


55 


B3 


5388 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


40 


0F 


2A 


C8 


55B8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


63 


5160 


FC 


A0 


00 


0F 


80 


00 


03 


00 


A4 


5390 


53 


OF 


2A 


50 


0F 


AA 


54 


0F 


48 


55C0 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


6B 


5163 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


03 


0B 


5398 


A8 


15 


0F 


A3 


15 


0F 


A0 


05 


EF 


55C8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


73 


5170 


00 


03 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


13 


53A0 


0F 


AO 


05 


CF 


A0 


01 


CF 


A3 


E5 


55D0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


7B 


5173 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


IB 


53A8 


01 


FF 


A8 


01 


FF 


2A 


00 


FF 


9D 


55D8 


0A 


41 


F0 


0A 


41 


FC 


0A 


41 


EA 


5180 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


23 


53B3 


2A 


00 


FF 


03 


00 


0F 


00 


30 


AS 


5580 


FC 


00 


00 


0C 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CA 


5188 


00 


00 


10 


00 


00 


10 


00 


08 


75 


53B8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


5F 


55E8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


93 


5190 


10 


C0 


0A 


11 


CO 


02 


55 


00 


76 


53C0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


67 


55F0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


9B 


5198 


00 


54 


00 


2A 


55 


F0 


00 


54 


B5 


S3C8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OA 


01 


Fa 


2A 


CF 


55F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


A3 


51A0 


00 


32 


55 


00 


OA 


11 


C0 


08 


8C 


53D0 


45 


FC 


2A 


55 


FC 


AS 


55 


FF 


29 


5600 


00 


00 


00 


00 


80 


00 


03 


00 


AC 


SlAS 


10 


C0 


00 


10 


00 


00 


10 


00 


A4 


53D8 


A8 


14 


3F 


Aa 


14 


OF 


A0 


14 


FC 


5608 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


40 


90 


2A 


30 


51B0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


53 


53E0 


0F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A8 


00 


3F 


A8 


17 


5610 


50 


03 


2A 


50 


00 


A8 


54 


00 


7A 


51B8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


SB 


53E8 


00 


3F 


28 


03 


3F 


2A 


00 


FC 


04 


5618 


A8 


14 


30 


A0 


14 


00 


Aa 


14 


IE 


51C0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


63 


53F0 


0A 


00 


FC 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


3C 


5620 


00 


A0 


14 


00 


A8 


15 


CF 


A8 


59 


51C8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


6B 


53F8 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


08 


9F 


5628 


15 


CF 


2A 


15 


CF 


2A 


00 


00 


11 


51D0 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


E6 


5400 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A8 


5630 


0A 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


El 


SIDB 


00 


14 


00 


0A 


55 


F0 


0A 


55 


F8 


5403 


30 


00 


05 


00 


00 


05 


00 


AA 


10 


5638 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E4 


51E0 


F0 


00 


14 


00 


03 


14 


00 


00 


CF, 


5410 


55 


FF 


AA 


55 


FF 


AA 


55 


FF 


63 


5640 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


EC 


51E8 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


FE 


5418 


A8 


05 


33 


2A 


05 


00 


2A 


05 


7A 


5648 


00 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


FF 


00 


E5 


51F0 


03 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


93 


5420 


00 


0A 


45 


00 


0A 


45 


00 


02 


5B 


5650 


05 


FF 


00 


55 


F0 


0A 


55 


C0 


EF 


51F8 


03 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


00 


9B 


5423 


55 


00 


02 


55 


00 


30 


55 


00 


BB 


5653 


AA 


51 


CO 


AA 


01 


C0 


AA 


01 


02 


5200; 


30 


00 


00 


33 


00 


00 


30 


00 


A4 


5430 


00 


55 


00 


00 


15 


00 


00 


00 


06 


5660 


C0 


AA 


01 


C0 


AA 


51 


C0 


0A 


6A 


5208: 


00 


00 


30 


00 


03 


00 


00 


00 


AC 


5438 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


03 


00 


E0 


5668 


55 


00 


00 


55 


F0 


00 


05 


FF 


D6 


5210: 


00 


00 


00 


33 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B4 


5440 


00 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


E8 


5670 


00 


00 


FF 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


59 


5218: 


00 


00 


FC 


00 


31 


FF 


00 


01 


65 


5448 


30 


00 


01 


C0 


A0 


05 


F0 


A0 


88 


5673 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


25 


5220: 


F3 


00 


30 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CA 


5450 


15 


FC 


A0 


15 


FC 


A8 


54 


3F 


7A 


5680 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


2D 


5228: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


30 


00 


00 


CC 


5458 


A0 


54 


3F 


A0 


50 


OF 


A0 


50 


A8 


5688 


30 


0A 


00 


F0 


2A 


41 


FC 


AA 


Cl 


5230: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


02 


00 


00 


00 


D4 


5460 


0F 


A0 


50 


0F 


A0 


50 


3F 


A0 


19 


5693 


41 


FF 


A0 


55 


3F 


A0 


14 


0F 


FA 


5238: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


DC 


5468 


50 


3F 


AA 


50 


3F 


AA 


50 


FC 


A5 


5698 


AO 


14 


3F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A0 


14 


B8 


5240: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


E4 


5470 


AA 


50 


FC 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


22 


56A0 


0F 


A0 


14 


OF 


A0 


14 


0F 


A8 


84 


5248: 


00 


00 


00 


03 


30 


00 


00 


00 


EC 


5478 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


30 


21 


56A8 


14 


OF 


AA 


55 


FF 


AA 


55 


FF 


23 


5250: 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


68 


5480 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


00 


29 


56B0 


A0 


00 


0F 


A0 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


05 


5258: 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


B6 


5488 


30 


00 


00 


03 


0A 


01 


F0 


2A 


91 


56B3 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


65 


5260: 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


03 


00 


D7 


5490 


05 


FC 


2A 


05 


FC 


A8 


15 


FF 


45 


56C0 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


60 


5268: 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


00 


14 


00 


80 


5498 


A8 


15 


3F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A0 


14 


FE 


56C8 


00 


0A 


00 


FO 


2A 


01 


FC 


2A 


80 


5270: 


00 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


15 


54A0 


0F 


A0 


14 


0F 


A8 


14 


3F 


A8 


29 


56D0 


00 


FC 


A8 


00 


3F 


AS 


00 


3F 


AD 


5278: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


30 


00 


00 


ID 


54Ae 


54 


3F 


2A 


55 


FF 


2A 


55 


FC 


36 


56D8 


A0 


00 


0F 


A0 


00 


0F 


A3 


00 


3F 


5280: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


25 


54B0 


3A 


55 


F3 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


Dl 


56E0 


0F 


AS 


00 


3F 


A8 


00 


3F 


A8 


9F 


5288: 


00 


03 


03 


00 


00 


03 


00 


00 


2D 


54B8 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


61 


56E8 


00 


3F 


2 A 


00 


FC 


2A 


55 


FC 


E2 


5290: 


00 


03 


30 


03 


00 


00 


00 


03 


35 


54C0 


30 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


69 


56F0 


0A 


55 


F0 


02 


55 


CO 


00 


00 


E3 


5298: 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


FF 


00 


00 


04 


■ 54C8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A0 


00 


00 


AA 


21 


56F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A5 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



5700; 
5708: 
5710; 
5718; 
5720! 
5728; 
5730! 
5738! 
5748; 
5748: 
5750! 
5753; 
5760; 
5768; 
5770: 
5778: 
5780: 
5783: 
5790: 
5798: 
57A0: 
57A8: 
57B0: 
57B8: 
57C0: 
57C8: 
57D3: 
57D8: 
57E0; 
57E8: 
57F0: 
57F8: 
5800: 
5833: 
5810: 
5818: 
5820: 
5828: 
5830: 
5838: 
5840: 
5848: 
5850: 
5858: 
5860: 
5863: 
587B: 
5878: 
5830: 
5888: 
5890: 
5393: 
53A0: 
58^8: 
58B0: 
5883: 
58C0: 
58C8: 
58D0: 
58D8: 
SSEB: 
58ES: 
58F3: 
58F8: 
5900: 
5908: 
5910: 
5913: 
5920: 
5928: 



;00 ee 

:00 00 
;55 FC 
:A8 00 
:0F A0 
; 55 FF 
;A0 30 
: 00 00 
;90 00 
:00 A3 
;00 0F 
;A0 14 
;0F fl0 
;14 0F 
:A0 00 
;00 00 
00 00 
00 A3 
00 00 
A0 14 
00 A0 

14 0F 
A0 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 0A 
05 F0 
A0 05 
0F A8 
00 3F 
0A 55 
00 93 
00 00 
00 A0 
55 FF 
A0 14 
00 A0 
55 FF 
A0 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 A8 
00 0F 
A0 00 
FF AA 
00 OF 
AS 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 A3 
00 00 
AA 55 
3F A0 
00 OF 
00 15 
00 00 
00 00 
00 A0 
00 3F 
0A 40 
C0 00 

15 00 
A0 30 
3 3 30 
SO 00 
30 00 
00 0F 
30 00 
0F A0 
55 FF 



00 00 
55 00 
2A 41 
3F AO 
00 0F 
AA 55 
3F A0 
00 00 
03 03 
00 3F 
A3 55 
3F A3 
14 0F 
AA 55 
0F A0 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
AO 55 
00 AO 
14 00 
AA 55 
OF AO 
00 00 
30 00 
35 FC 
A8 05 
3F A0 
00 3F 
2A 00 
FO 02 



00 00 
0A 55 
FC A8 
30 3F 
AO 00 
FF AA 
00 0F 
00 00 
00 00 
A8 00 
0F AO 
14 OF 
A0 14 
FF AA 
00 0F 
00 00 
00 00 
A8 00 
00 A0 
14 00 
AO 14 
FF AA 
00 OF 
00 00 
30 00 
2A 05 
FC A8 
00 OF 
AS 03 
FC 2A 
55 C0 



09 00 00 00 



93 00 
00 0F 
AA 55 
OF AO 
14 90 
AA 55 
ap A0 
00 00 
00 00 
00 3F 
A0 00 
OF AA 
55 FF 
A0 00 
3F AS 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
AO 00 
FC AA 
00 0F 
AS 00 
FC 00 
00 00 
00 09 
09 OF 

2 A 09 
F9 02 
55 CO 
AA 55 
0F A0 

03 03 
00 03 
00 3F 
30 00 
3F 03 
30 3F 
AA 55 



30 00 
A0 09 
FF AA 

14 00 
A0 14 
FF AA 
90 0F 
00 00 
00 30 
A3 03 
0F A9 
55 FF 
A0 00 
gp A9 
00 3F 
00 00 
00 00 
A8 00 
03 AA 
55 FF 
A0 00 
OF 00 

15 F0 
00 00 
09 00 
A8 00 
3C 0A 
51 F0 
03 55 
FF AA 
00 0F 
00 09 
00 00 
30 00 
0F 00 
00 OF 
A0 00 
FF AA 



30 00 AE 
FO 2A 13 
30 3F CB 
A0 00 8A 
0P AA 3D 
55 FF 81 
00 00 57 
00 00 Ee 
00 00 EE 
3F A0 79 
55 OF E0 
AO 14 7A 
0F A0 46 
55 FF E4 
00 00 97 
00 30 27 
30 30 2F 
00 A0 47 
55 00 D5 
AO 14 9C 
0F AO 0E 
55 FF 25 
00 00 D7 
00 00 67 
00 00 6F 
CC 2A 93 
05 3F 77 
A0 00 88 
3F A8 Al 
55 FC E4 
90 00 E5 
00 00 A7 
00 00 BO 
0F AA 9F 
55 FF 6B 
00 14 BE 
OF AA 99 
55 FF 83 
00 00 59 
00 00 E8 
00 00 F9 
3F A0 7B 
09 OF E2 
AA 55 3B 
OF A0 2A 
00 0F FA 
00 00 E4 
00 00 29 
00 30 31 
30 A0 49 
55 F0 98 
A0 30 2A 
OF AS D5 
14 3F 12 
00 00 B2 
00 00 69 
00 00 71 
OF A8 9E 
00 FC 9D 
02 55 84 
00 00 FD 
55 FF 24 
00 00 lA 
00 00 A9 
00 00 B2 
3F 00 2D 
00 OF 0E 
00 00 E8 
0F AA 41 
55 FF 85 



5930 

5938 

5940: 

5948: 

5930: 

5953; 

5960: 

5968: 

5970; 

5978; 

5980; 

5988; 

5990: 

5993; 

59A0; 

59A8; 

59Bfl; 

59B8! 

59C0! 

59C8; 

5900! 

59D8: 

59E0: 

59E8: 

59F0: 

59F8: 

5A0O: 

5A03: 

5A10: 

5A18: 

5A20: 

5A28: 

5A30: 

SA38: 

5A40: 

5A48: 

5A50: 

5A53: 

5A60: 

5A68: 

5A70: 

5A78: 

5A80: 

5A88: 

5A90: 

5A98: 

5AA9: 

5AA8: 

5AB0: 

5AB8: 

5AC0; 

SACS: 

5AD01 

5AD8: 

5AE0: 

5AE8: 

5AF0: 

5AF8: 

5B00: 

5808: 

5810: 

5B1S: 

5B20: 

5B23: 

5830; 

5B38: 

5B40: 

5B48: 

SB50: 

5858: 



:A0 30 
:00 00 
:30 30 
:00 00 
:55 FF 
:02 40 
:00 02 
:40 00 
:AA 55 
: 00 00 
:0O 00 
:00 AA 
:55 FF 
:00 05 
:00 02 
:55 FF 
: 03 00 
:0O 00 
;30 93 
:O0 3A 
:55 FC 
:A0 00 
:0F A0 
:0O 3F 
:0A 55 
:0O 00 
:09 00 
:0O 0A 
:54 00 
:A0 05 
:09 A0 
;05 00 
:A9 90 
; 90 93 
;00 00 
;30 OA 
;55 FC 
;A0 01 
;0F AO 
;O0 3F 
;0A 55 
;00 00 
;00 00 
;09 00 
:53 3F 
A0 14 
CO A0 
15 00 
AO 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
05 FC 
A8 14 
OF A0 

54 3F 
OA 4 
00 00 
09 00 
03 A8 
99 09 
A0 09 
FF AA 
30 9F 
A8 90 
00 00 
00 00 
00 AA 

55 FO 
00 00 



0F AB 
00 00 
30 00 
00 0F 
2A 55 
00 02 

54 00 
2A 55 
FF 00 
00 00 
00 00 

55 FF 
A0 00 
CO 00 
50 00 
AA 55 
OF 00 
09 00 
09 00 
55 FO 
A8 09 
OF A0 
00 0F 
28 00 
F0 02 
00 00 
00 00 
50 00 
AA 5 5 
00 A3 
05 00 
AA 5 5 
0F AO 
00 00 
90 00 
55 C3 
AS 00 
CF A0 
30 OF 
28 00 
F0 02 
00 00 
00 00 
00 0F 
AA 50 
F0 A0 
15 C0 
AA 55 
OF A0 
90 00 
00 00 
00 09 
2A 05 
OF AO 
14 0F 
2A 53 
FC 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
A0 00 
0F AA 
55 F? 
Ag 03 
90 A3 
00 09 
00 09 
55 C9 
AO 00 
OF 00 



00 OF 
00 00 

00 00 
AA 55 
FF 0A 
50 00 
02 50 
FF AA 
90 9F 
00 03 
00 09 
AA 5 5 
FC A0 
15 30 
0A 40 
FF AA 
00 OF 
00 00 
00 00 
2A 55 
3F A8 
00 0F 
AO 09 
3C 2A 
55 CO 
09 09 
00 09 
2 A 54 
00 A3 
95 30 
A3 05 3 
FF AA 
00 0F 
00 00 
00 00 
2A 55 
FF A8 
00 OF 
A0 00 
3C 2A 
55 C0 
00 00 
93 09 
9A 49 
3C A0 
15 F0 
AO 15 
FF AA 
00 OF 
00 00 
00 00 
OA 01 
FC A3 
14 OF 
A3 14 
3F 2A 
00 90 
00 00 
00 00 
AS 00 
00 AO 
55 FF 
A0 00 
00 A0 
00 00 
00 00 
09 09 
A A 55 
3C 00 
93 9F 



00 00 58 
00 00 EA 
00 00 F2 
FF AA 41 
40 00 F0 
03 54 13 
00 OA 79 
55 FF 2B 
09 00 0A 
03 90 2B 

90 90 33 
FF AA E5 

91 F0 5F 
90 54 Al 
30 2A 59 
55 FF 06 
00 00 81 
00 00 6B 
00 00 73 
FC 2A 82 
00 3F 5E 
AO 00 45 
0F A8 FF 
55 FC A2 
09 90 E9 
09 00 AB 
99 00 B4 
00 2A 16 
15 00 66 
A9 05 D6 

A0 57 
55 FF 5F 
00 00 5D 
30 00 EC 

00 00 F4 
FF 2A 37 

01 FF A3 
AO 00 IF 
OF A3 81 
55 FC 24 
00 00 SB 
00 03 2D 
00 00 35 
OF 2A C7 

14 FC 21 
A0 15 8D 
00 A0 86 
55 FF E7 
00 00 DD 
00 00 6D 
00 09 75 
F0 2A DD 

15 3F D0 
A0 14 05 
0F A8 15 
50 FC 22 
09 90 5A 
00 90 AD 
00 00 86 
00 AO CE 
00 OF 6C 
AA 55 01 
OF A0 EF 
00 00 39 
00 00 C5 
09 9 EE 
00 3a F6 
F0 AA 97 
99 3F 23 
00 00 2D 



5B60 
5B6S 
5B73 
5B78 
5383 
5B88 
5B90 
5B9a 
5BA3 
5BA8 
5BB0 
SBB8 
5BC0 
5BC8 
5BD0 
5808 
58E0 
5BB3 
5BF0 
5BF3 
5C00 
5C08 
5Cia 
5C13 
5C20 
5C23 
5C30 
5C33 
5C40 
5C43 
5C50 
5C53 
5C60 
5C63 
5C70 
5C78 
5C80 
5C88 
5C90 
5C98 
5CA0 
5CA8 
5CB0 
5CB8 
5CC0 



;0F 00 
:00 3C 
:AA 55 
;90 00 
! 00 00 
: 00 A0 
:54 00 
;90 05 
:3F 00 
:55 FC 
lAA 40 
;00 00 
100 00 
;00 AO 
:55 FF 
100 05 
:00 00 
:01 FO 

AA 55 

00 00 

00 00 

00 A0 

00 0F 

02 51 

00 00 

51 FO 

A3 00 

00 09 

00 09 

00 00 

00 00 

02 50 OF 00 55 

FF 

50 OF 



00 OF 00 
AA 55 PC 
CO 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 AA 
AA 55 CO 
FF 00 00 
00 FF 00 
AA 55 CO 
00 A0 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 AA 
AA 55 FC 
CO 00 15 
05 C0 00 
AA 55 FC 
FP A0 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 0P A8 
2A 00 3C 
F0 00 55 
15 00 00 
0A 4 FC 
0F A9 09 
00 99 09 
09 09 09 
09 93 A9 
2A 93 90 



:A8 09 

:00 00 

:00 <3d 

:00 AS 

:00 OF 

:A0 50 

:0F A9 

:05 OF 

:AA 00 

: 00 03 

: 00 00 



15 FF 00 
0A 43 03 
00 A0 03 
00 09 00 
00 00 09 
FF AA 
A2 43 OF 
OF A0 50 
14 9F A0 
A9 01 CF 
FF AA 09 
09 90 09 
99 90 00 



00 3F 
AA 55 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
40 30 
00 55 
FF 30 
05 FF 
AA 54 
00 30 
00 30 

00 00 
55 FF 
AO 01 
C0 00 

01 C0 
AA 55 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 OP 
0A 4 9 
C0 00 
55 CO 
2A 00 
OF 90 
09 90 
09 90 
00 00 
0A 4 9 
FF 90 
54 gF 
2A 00 
00 90 
00 00 
00 00 
00 FF 
A2 40 
OF A0 
05 0F 
A0 91 
3P 00 
00 90 
00 00 



AO AE 
P0 07 
00 E9 
00 2F 
90 37 
AA 63 
FC C9 
00 90 
00 0B 
00 4D 
00 D6 
00 6F 
00 77 
AA FC 
F0 3A 
15 A9 
A0 6A 
FF 44 
00 5C 
00 AF 
00 BS 
AS E5 
FC 59 
15 07 

02 54 
3F DA 
09 65 

03 F9 
90 F8 
AS AE 
9F 06 
15 C7 
9 2 2D 
9 9 FA 
90 87 
90 31 
00 3 9 
AA 6B 
OF F7 
14 B5 
AO 54 
FF CE 
09 66 
90 71 
00 79 



VERTISCROLL 

MS 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COM 

PUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL L 

TO - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
PX 20 IF A=0THENA=1:LOAD"VG.CO 

DE",a,l 
DH 30 IF B=OTHENB=1:LOAD"VS.LE 

TTERS",8,1 
DG 40 S=16923:E=17407 
BE 50 PRINT"{CLR} {3 D0WN}{WHT) 

[4 SPACES )VERTISCROLL - 

[SPACElSCROLL TEXT EDITO 

R" 
QH 60 PRINT" {3 DOWN] PRESS SPA 

CE TO ENTER THE TEXT EDI 

TOR." 
RC 70 PRINT" {down} YOU CAN USE 

12 LIMES MAXIMUM." 
KS 30 PSINT"{D0WN} PLEASE TYPE 
AN e AT THE END OF YOUR 
QS 90 PRINT" (DOWN) TEXT AND PR 

ESS RETURN TO STORE." 
FP 100 GET A$:IF AS<>" "THEN10 



G-34 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



MX iia 

DS 120 
AM 130 
EQ 140 



e 

PRrNT"{CLR}"; :OPEN 1,0: 

INPUT#1,T$:CL0SE1 

FOR X=1024 TO 1503: POKE 

S+X-1024,?EEK(X) : POKE 
{SPACE)X,42:NEXT 
PRINT"CCLR} {3 DOWNlPRES 
S SPACE TO SEE YOUR VER 
TISCROLL." 

GET A$:IF A$<>" "THEN14 
3 

SYS16384 

PRINT" {CLRHS DOVra}PRES 
S 'S' TO SAVE, OR 'E' T 
EDIT." 

GET KS: IFKS=""THEN170 
IF KS="E"THEN SYS 16387 
:GOTO40 
SYS16387 

INPUT" {2 DOWN)SAVE FILE 
NAME";F$ 

F$="@0:"+FS:OPEN1,8,1,F 
$: POKE 2 52,5/256: POKE 251 
,S-PEEK(252) *256 
POKE78 2,E/2 56:POKE7 81,E 
-PEEK (782) *25 6:POKE73 0, 
251:SYS65496:CLOSEl 
PRINT"<7>" 
TF STO0THEN PRINT" 
(2 DOWNlERROR DURING SA 
VE!":END 



Daniel English is a frequent contributor. 
He hopes someday to open his own 
business to create and distribute soft- 
ware for the 64 and Amiga. He lives in 
Moreno Valley, California. 



FX 


150 


JC 


160 


SE 


170 


QA 


180 


PF 


190 


RR 


200 


JP 


210 


XM 


220 


JB 


230 


CH 


240 



EASY DOES IT 



By Hugh Rountree 

Erasable programmable read only mem- 
ory, better known as EPROM, is a great 
concept. It lets you load your favorite pro- 
grams onto a cartridge that plugs into 
your 64 or 128, and these programs are 
instantly available whenever you boot 
your computer. Whatever is stored in an 
EPROM chip acts like regular ROM, but 
you can erase the chip and refill it with oth- 
er programs whenever you wish. 

I purchased a Promenade 01 
EPROM programming device about six 
or seven years ago from the Jason-Ra- 
nheim Company, but I'll have to confess 
that I've used it very little untH recently. 
There are two main reasons for this. 

First of all, Motorola's EPROM 68766, 
the 24-pin 8K x 8-bit version of the 2764 
found in early Commodores, was priced 
at five times the cost of the 2764 original. 
The Motorola chip was the only EPROM 
that would exactly replace the ROM IC's 



used in Commodore's early computers 
and disk drives. 

Second, the original Promos software 
that came with Promenade was for ex- 
perienced programmers. It was compli- 
cated to use. You had to swap back and 
forth from the Promos' BASIC environ- 
ment to a machine language monitor 
such as Micromon, Supermon, or 
Hesmon. 

During the past several years, how- 
ever, the price of the 68766 has 
dropped from approximately $25.00 to 
less than $5.00 each. The last ones that 
I purchased from Jameco cost $4.75 
each. So now I can afford to program all 
of the EPROMs that I wish for all of my 
Commodore equipment. 

In contacting Jason-Ranheim, I 
learned that they now have a version 2 of 
Promos, which has many added com- 
mands, including most of those found in 
a ML monitor. Also Promos had been al- 
tered so that you can enter manual com- 
mands with hexadecimal numbers in- 
stead of decimal. Another improvement 
is that commands can be executed from 
within a BASIC program using integer var- 
iables, which of course work only with dec- 
imal numbers. 

Since I prefer entry in hex instead of 
decimal, that meant I had to use a hex-to- 
decimal conversion routine. So when 1 
got the new Promos software, I began writ- 
ing Easy Does It to augment the superb 
qualities of Promos V2.0. 

Typing It In 

Easy Does It is written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
it with The Automatic Proofreader. See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. Be sure to save a copy of the pro- 
gram before you attempt to run it. I 
have also included a boot program 
that will automatically load and run 
Easy Does It and Promos. Make sure 
that all of these programs are on the 
same disk. 

When Easy Does It loads Promos, 
you'll see the following menu. 

Zero Socket — Z 

Fill Memory(Zero)— F 

Check Eprom/Erasure — E 

Load Disk File-~L 

Save Disk File—S 

Set Eprom PaRAMeter— P 

Set Ram Addresses— ADD 



Read Eprom — R 
Write Eprom — W 
Write EpromA/erify— '\/ER 
Verify Eprom/Ram — V 
?h 

If you notice, the letter Hap pears be- 
neath the cursor. If you hit the Return 
key with the /-/showing, you'll find your- 
self viewing an auxiliary help screen. It 
looks something like the following. 

COMMAND ADDENDUM 

( M/l/D/A/C/T) 

TOGGLE (CHECKSUM OFF) 

Each letter is a different command lo en- 
ter. These commands are similar to 
those found in ML Monitors such as Su- 
permon or Micromon. M is the memory 
command used to view the hex value 
of memory addresses. 

I displays the ASCII value of these 
same addresses. 

D for data lets you view the hex val- 
ue of addresses read directly from an 
EPROM installed in the Promenade 
socket. 

A displays the ASCII value of these 
EPROM addresses. 

C lets you compare one range of 
RAM addresses to another range. 

T transfers the data from one RAM 
address range to another. 

Toggle will in effect enable the check- 
sum and hash total reporting built into 
Promos. This feature is normally lost 
when Promos commands are executed 
from BASIC. 

Be careful using the Toggle com- 
mand because it works by taking the 
computer out of BASIC mode and put- 
ting it into manual mode. If you have a 
DOS wedge installed with Promos and 
operate a BASIC program in manual 
mode, should you inadvertently enter a 
wedge command from the keyboard, 
the DOS command may respond with 
disastrous results. I have had a whole 
disk directory scrambled by inadvertent- 
ly entering a DOS command in these cir- 
cumstances. I recommend operating in 
Checksum Off mode when possible. 

Using Easy Does It 

Easy Does It makes it no longer neces- 
sary to figure out and enter the correct 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-35 



PROGRAMS 



control word or program method num- 
bers. They are automatically selected 
from a buiit-in database within the pro- 
gram. All that is required for automatic 
selection of these values is entry of the 
program voltage and the EPROM 
type. 

When you enter a P to set EPROM 
parameters, you will be asked to enter 
the voltage, EPROts/l type, and also the 
EPROfvl start address. The EPROM 
end address will be automatically set 
for the last byte of the EPROfvl itself. 
The RAM hex start and end addresses 
control how many bytes will be pro- 
grammed, which you are asked to en- 
ter upon entry of the Add command or 
Set RAM Addresses. 

The Zero Socket command, Z, sets 
all pins of the EPROM socket to volt- 
age. The Fill Memory command. F, fills 
the memory address range between 
the RAM hex start address and the 
RAM hex end address. The Check 
EPROM/Erasure command, E, checks 
to see if the EPROM is in an erased 
state (all FF) from the EPROM start ad- 
dress to the EPROM end address. 

The Load Disk File command, L, will 
load a disk file with the specified file- 
name to RAM beginnirig at the RAM 
hex start address. The Save Disk File 
will save RAM contents beginning with 
the RAM hex start address and ending 
with the RAM hex end address. If you 
enter any disk file commands acciden- 
tally, you may return to the menu by 
pressing Return on a blank fiiename. 

The Read EPROM command, R, 
reads data from the EPROM start ad- 
dress to RAM beginning at the RAM 
hex start address and ending at the 
RAM hex end address. 

The Write EPROM command, W, pro- 
grams an EPROM beginning at the 
EPROM start address with code begin- 
ning at the RAM hex start address and 
ending at the RAM hex end address. 
The Write EPROM/Verify command, 
VER, first performs an Erasure. E, com- 
mand, and then if it passes this com- 
mand, it begins a W command. After 
this comimand finishes, it then does a 
V command. 

The Verify EPROM/RAM command, 
V, verifies that the code in the EPROM 
beginning at the EPROM start address 
is identical with code beginning with 
the RAM hex start address and ending 

G-36 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



with the RAM hex end address. 

Once entered, all of the data except 
for the main menu input and the file- 
name inputs will stay with the last en- 
tered value. Simply press Return to re- 
tain the earlier data at the appropriate 
prompt. 

I could have created a much longer 
BASIC program with more features, but 
! decided that it was best to keep it as 
short as possible and leave a larger 
RAM buffer for use in holding code for 
programming EPROMs. Jason-Ra- 
nheim advises leaving 14K of RAM for 
the BASIC program. Warning: Promos 
V2.0 v/ill not allow disk file saves above 
SCFFF 

Upon running, Easy Does It sheds a 
little excess baggage by deleting the 
first seven lines (10-70) of the program 
when they execute, OthenA/ise, the pro- 
gram would give an OUT OF MEMORY 
error message and refuse to run before 
all of the variables were executed. The 
first 70 lines are REM statements for 
information on the program:, creating 
the RAM buffer by moving the top of BA- 
SIC down to SIFFF, filling memory 
from hex 2000 to hex DFFF with zeros, 
and finally deleting the first 70 lines, 
whereupon the program runs again be- 
ginning with line 80. 

If you own a Promenade EPROM de- 
vice and don't have the latest Promos 
V2.0 software with a manual, you may 
order it for S29.95 on a 5'/i-inch disk or 
S32.95 on a 3V2-inch disk. The ad- 
dress is Jason-Ranheim Company, 
3105 Gayle Lane, Auburn, California 
95602; (800) 421-7731. The company 
also carries EPROM supplies. 

BOOT 

PK 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 

- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
QS 10 REM BOOT PROGRAM FOR EAS 

y DOES IT & PROMOS V2.0 

{SPACE]By HUGH ROUKTREE 
DF 20 D$="8":D=PEEK(ia6) :IFD>7 

THENDS=RIGHT5(STRS(D) , LE 

N(STR$ (D) ) -1) 
FR 30 PRINTCHR$(147) :PRINT:PRI 

NT"L0RD";CHR5 (34) ;"PB";C 

HRS(34) ;","D$",1" 
KE 40 F0RI=1T09:PRINTCHR? (13) ; 

: NEXT: PRINT "P0KE56, 32 :NE 

W";PRINT:PRINT 
CP 50 PRINT"LOAD";CHRS(34) ;"EA 

SY DOES IT";CHR$(34) ;"," 

D5;CHRS(19) ; 



KJ 60 F0RI=631T0633:READDA:P0K 
EI,DA:NEXTI:P0KE198,3:NE 
W:DATA13,13,131 

EASY DOES IT 



KD 13 

RS 20 

AA 30 

HG 40 

PX 5 3 

GR 60 

DD 70 

HS 80 

PX 90 

RR 101 

XA 110 

GP 120 

PR 130 

MM 14 

CK 150 



FJ 16 
XF 17 



KD 180 



AX 190 



REM EASY DOES IT BY HUGH 
ROUNTREE COPYRIGHT 1993 
- COMPUTE PUBLICATIONS 
REM*ENABLE PROMOS V2,0 P 
REVIOUSLy*LINES 10-70 AU 
TO -DELETE WHEN PROGRAM R 
UNS* 

REM*SET W=l IN LINE 90 T 
DISABLE SOUND TONE* 
PRINTCHR$ (147) ;" 
{7 SPACES)AUTO-DELETING 
{SPACE}LINESC2 SPACES}10 
-70": PRINT 

PRINT " 10 " : PRI NT " 20 " : PRI N 
T"30":PRINT"40":PRINT"5f 
":PRINT"60":PRINT"70" 
PRrHT"F 2000, DFFF, 00:RUN 
";CHR$(19) ; 

FORI =1T0 8: POKE 630+1, 13 :N 
EXT:POKE198,a:POKE56, 32: 
END 

DIMH (15) ,W(8,3) ,PH(8, 3) , 
CA{7) ,AS(4) ,D5(2) ,RS(7} , 
X? (4) :F0RI = 1T04:READDV(I 

) 

NEXT:FORI=1T08:RSADE$(I) 
:F0RIA=1T0 3:REA0W(I ,IA) , 
PM(I,IA) : NEXT : NEXT :W=0 
DATA40 96,25 6,16,1,"O7FF 
",42,70,0,0,4O,71,"0FFF 
",226,70,225,7,224,7 
DATA"1FFF",6,14,5, 14,20 
,14,"3FFF",6,14,5,14,0, 
0,"7FFF",230,70,229,70, 
0,0 

DAT A" FFFF", 226, 6, 0,3,0, 
0,"1FFF",0,0,0,0,48,70, 
"03FF",0,0,O,0,4O,7 
TG$ (0)="OFF) ":TGS(1) -" 
{SPACE} ON) ":IA=43:F0RI= 
0TO15:H (I)=I+1A:IFI=9TH 
ENIA=55 

NEXT:DS(1)="C0MPARE":D$ 
(2) ="TRANSFER":R${1)="L 
OW UNERASED BYTE" 
RS(2)="HIGH byte LOADED 
":RS{3)="HIGH byte SAVE 
D":R$ (4)="HIGH byte REA 
D" 

RS(5)="FAIL ADDRESS":RS 
{6)=R?(5) :R$(7}=RS(5) 
A$ (1) ="START":A$(2)="EN 
D":A5 (3)="C0MPARE":AS (4 
) ="TRANSFER" 
CS (1) ="ERASURE":CS(2) =" 
DISK LOAD":C$ (3)="DISK 
{SPACE} SAVE" :C$(4)="REA 
D EPROM" 

CS(51="WRITE eprOM":C5( 
6)="VERIFY EPR0M":CS(7) 
'"COMPARE RAM":S$=" 
{8 SPACES}" 



SK 203 KS(1) ="PASSED":KS(2)="F 

AILED":Db]% = 8:DN = PEEK(18 

6) :IFDN>7THEtgDN% = DN 
AH 210 PRINTCHR5(147)CHR${14)S 

$S$"PROMENAOE" 
PQ 220 PRINT: PBINTS$"Z^ERO ^OCK 

ET > Z" 

CD 230 PRINT: PHINTSS"FILL MEMO 

RY(£ERO) > F" 

EF 240 PRINT:PRINTS$"CHECK EPR 

OH/E^RASaRE-> E" 
KF 250 PRINT:PRINTS5"L0AD DISK 

FILE > L" 

MA 260 PRINT :PRI NTS $"S^AVE DISK 

FILE > S^" 

SC 270 PRINT: PRINTS$"S^ET EPROM 

£ARAMETER-> P" 
AG 280 PRINT: PRINTS$"SET RAM A 

DDRESSES > ADD " 

EC 290 PHINT:PRINTSS"READ EPRO 

M > r'^ 

EA 300 PRINT: PRINTSS"WRITE EPR 

OH > W" 

EG 310 PRINT: PRINTSS"WRrTE EPR 

OM/VERIFy--> VER " 
BK 320 PRINT;PRINTSS"VERIFY EP 

ROM/RAM > V" 

FH 330 PRINT:PRINTSS" 

{2 SPACES }H{ 3 LEFT}";: I 

NPUT C$ 
FP 340 IFCS="Z"THENGOSUB540:GO 

SUB550 
PK 350 IFC$="F"THENGOSUB540:GO 

SUB830:GOSaB560 
SE 360 IFC$="E"THENGOSUB540:CM 

=1:GOSUB600:CM=0 
BJ 370 IFC$="L"THENGOSUB540:CM 

=2;GOSUB62O:CM=0 
CB 380 IFCS="S"THENGOSUB540:GO 

SUBi3a0:IFEA<53248THENC 

H=3:GOSUB653:CM=3 
JB 390 IFCS="P"THENGOSOB540:GO 

SUB680 
HP 400 IFCS="ADD"THENGOSUB543: 

GOSUB830 
AR 410 IFC$="R"THENGOSUB540:CM 

=4:GOSUBa90:CM=0 
MJ 420 IFC$="W"THENGOSUB540:CM 

=5:GOSUB9O0:CM=0 
GP 433 IFC$="VER"THENGOSUB540: 

CM=1:GOSUB910:CM=0 
BH 440 IFCS="V"THENGOSUB540:CM 

=6:GOSUB970:CM=3 
HE 450 IFC$="H"THENGOSUB54a:GO 

SUB980 
RD 460 IFC5="M"THENGOS!JBS40:GO 

SUB1290 
PB 470 IFCS="I"THENGOSUB543:GO 

S'JB13aa 
RB 480 IFCS="D"THENGOSOB540:GO 

SUB1310 
DB 490 IFC$="A"THENGOSOB540:GO 

SUB1320 
DG 500 IFC$="C"THENGOSUB540;CM 

=7:GOSUB1350:CM=0 
SJ 510 IFC5="T"THENGOSUB540:GO 

SUB1370 



SR 520 IFC$="T0GGLE"THENG0SUB5 

4a:GOSUB1400 
BC 530 GOTO210 
BS 540 PRINTCHRS(147}CHRS(142) 

: RETURN 
QQ 550 Z:RETURN 
PQ 560 BYl=0:PRItgT"{2 SPACES}E 

NTER VALUE FOR MEMORY F 

ILL" 
EM 570 PRINT"{2 SPACES}HEX (50 

0-SFF) "; :INPUTB$:L=LEN 

(BS) :IFL<>2THENGOTO560 
MG 580 H5="00"+BS:HA=0:GOSUBla 

40:IFHA<aORHA>2 5 5THEN5 6 


DF 590 BYI=HA%:F BA% , EA% ,BY% : R 

ETURN 
EX 600 IFEE%=0ORCW%=0THENGOSUB 

680 
JF 610 E ES%,EE%,CW%:GOSUB1220 

: RETURN 
HQ 620 IFBA%=0THENGOSUB830 
AA 630 GOSUB100(}:IFN5 = ""THENRE 

TURN 
HG 640 L N$,DN%,BA%:GOSUB1220: 

RETURN 
JE 650 IFBA%=0ANDEA%=0THENGOSU 

B830 
QR 660 GOSUB1000:IFN$=""THENRE 

TURN 
DX 670 S N$,DN%,BA%,EA%:G0SUB1 

22a:RETURN 
QG 680 PRINT" {2 SPACESjENTER P 

ROGRAH VOLTS (12.5/21/25 

) ":PRINT"{2 SPACES}"; :I 

NPUTVS 
CJ 690 IFV$<>"12.5"ANDV$<>"21" 

ANDVS<>"25"THENGOTO68 
RQ 700 PV=1:IFVAL(V$)>12.5THEN 

PV=2:IFVAL(V$)>21THENPV 

= 3 
XM 710 PRINT:PBINT"{2 SPACES}E 

NTER EPROM TYPE(275a/27 

15/2732/2764) " 
EG 720 PRINT"(2 SPACES }( 27128/ 

27 256/27 512/6 8764/687 66 

/68769) " 
JQ 730 PRINT"{2 SPACES}"; :INPU 

TPS:IFP$="687 64"ORPS="6 

8769"THENPS="68766" 
GC 740 OK=l:IFPS<>"2758"ANDPS< 

>"2716"ANDP$<>"27 32"AND 

PS<>"2764"THENOK=0 
QS 750 IFOK=0RNDPS<>"2712a"AND 

PS<>"272 56"ANDP$<>"27 5i 

2"ANDPS<>"687 66"THENGOT 

0710 
SS 760 BT=16:S=1:PRINT" 

{2 SPACES}"; :L=LEN(P$) : 

ET=VAL (RIGHTS (PS, L-2) ) : 

ML=2:GOSUB1130 
JH 770 PRINT: IFCW%=0ORPM%=0THE 

NCOS UBl 160: GOTO 68 3 
HE 780 H5=E$(S) :EAS(2)=H$:HA=0 

:GOSUB104 3:MA=HA:EE%=HA 

%:A1=1:GOSUB790:ES%=HA% 

: RETURN 



XM 793 PRINT" {2 SPACES }ENTER E 
PROM "A5(A1)" ADDRESS": 
ES=H5:IFA1=1THENLA=0:ES 
= "00" 

QK 800 PRINT"{2 SPACES } (S"ES"- 

$";E$ (S) ;") "; rINPUTEAS 

(Al) 
BD 810 PRINT:HS=RIGHTS ("0000"+ 

EAS(Al) ,4) :HA=O:GOSUB10 

40;IFHA<LAORHA>HATHEN79 


HJ 820 RETURN 
AC 833 Al=l:CA=8192:GOSUB840:B 

A=HA:BA%=HA%:A1=2:CA=BA 

:GOSUB840:EA=HA:EA%=HA% 

:RETURN 
QF 840 PRINT"t2 SPACES}ENTER R 

AM "A$(A1)" HEX ADDRESS 

":X$=XS(1) :IFA1<>2THENX 

S="2000" 
CB 850 PRINT"(2 SPACES}S"XS"-S 

DFFF) "; :INPUTXS (Al) :PR 

INT 
HG 860 L=LEN(X$ (Al) ) :IFL<>4THE 

N840 
FP 873 H$=XS (Al) :HA=0:GOSUB104 

0:IFHA<CAORHA>57343THEN 

840 
ex 880 RETURN 
RR 890 GOSUB930:R BA%,EA%,ES%, 

CW%:GOSUB12 20: RETURN 
HA 930 GOSUB933:GOSUB960:RETUR 

N 
CC 910 GOSUB600:CM=5;IFCK=2THE 

N1170 
XP 923 GOSUB930:GO3U3960:CM=6: 

GOSUB970:RETURN 
XE 930 IFBA%=0OREA%=0THENGOSOB 

830 
AA 940 IFCW%=0ORPHI=0THENGOSUB 

680 
CD 950 RETURN 
FM 960 P BA%,EA%,ESI,CW%,PM*:G 

OSUB1220:RETURN 
PF 970 GOSUB930:V BA%,EAI,ES%, 

CW%:GOSUB1220: RETURN 
QP 980 PRINTS$"[3 SPACES}COMMA 

ND{2 SPACES}ADDENDUM":P 

RINT:PRINT"(7 SPACES} ( 

{ SPACE )M / X / D / A / 

[SPACE}C / T ) " 
FJ 990 PRINT:PRINTSS" TOGGLE ( 

CHECKSUM "TGS{TG) :G0T01 

170 
KP 1000 NS="" :PRINT:PRINT" 

{2 SPACES}ENTER FILENA 
ME" 
GB 1010 PRINT"{2 SPACES}";:INP 
UTN5: PRINT: IFNS=""THEN 
RETURN 
DH 1020 IFKS=","0RNS="?"0RNS=" 
*"0RNS="@"0RNS-" ; "ORNS 
="."THENGOTO1000 
SB 1030 RETURN 

QR 1043 L=LEN(HS) :F0RI=LT01STE 
P-1:B=1S:A=ASC (MIDS(Hg 
,1,1)) :IFA>47ANDA<58TH 

NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-37 



PROGRAMS 



SP 1050 

AP 1960 
FB 1070 

RP 1080 
QE 1090 
XS 1100 
GX 1110 
PR 1120 

CK 1130 



JH 1140 
XM 1150 

DS 1160 



ER 1170 

FQ 1180 
AG 1190 

KD 1200 

XG 1210 
GH 1220 

CP 1230 

GG 12 4 

PB 1250 

QQ 1260 

MJ 1270 

KC 1280 
JD 1290 

BS 1300 

PA 1310 

PS 1320 

ED 1330 

DA 1340 

HB 1350 



ENl0e0 

FA=0: IFA<65ORA>70THENF 

A=1:GOTO1070 

GOSUB1090 

SEXTI:IFFATHENFA=0:HA= 

-1: RETURN 

GOSUB1120:RETURN 

B=B-1:IFH (B) >ATHEN10 90 

GOSUB1110:RETURN 

HA=HA+ (B*DV(I) ) : RETURN 

HA%=HA+65 53 6*(HA>327 67 

} : RETURN 

RE-ET-BT:BT=BT*ML: IFRE 

THENS=S+1:IFS>6THENML= 

l:BT = 766: IFS>7THENBT=»5 

8 

IFRETHB^^GOTO1130 

CW%=W(S,PV) :PM%=PH{S,P 

V) :ML=2:RETURN 

PRINT3S"SELECTED EPROM 

TYPE AND":PRINTSS"PGM 
. VOLTAGE NOT VALID," 
PRINT:PRINT"{6 SPACES} 
-PRESS ASY KEY TO CONT 
INUE-" : PRINT : IFWTHEN12 
00 

POKE54 296,15:POKE54 278 
,89:POKE54276,33 
POKE 54 27 3, 34: POKE 54 272 
, 75; FORI =1TO103: NEXT:? 
OKE5427 3,45:POKE54272, 
90 

GETAS: IFA$=""THENONW+i 
GOTO1193,1Z00 
POKE54296,0:RETURN 
AD=PEEK{166) +256*PEEK ( 
167) 

IFPEEK (165) =0THENCK=1 : 
IFCH>4THEN1260 
PRINT: IFPEEK (165) =2 5 5T 
HENCK=2 
IFCM>10RCK=2THENPRINT" 

"AD"= ADDRESS OF "R${ 
CM) 

POKE165,0:POKE166,0:PO 
KE167,0:IFCM<>4THENPRI 
NT"{2 SPACES}"C$ (CM)" 
{SPACE JCOMMAND "K$(CK) 
IFC$="VER"THENIFCH=10R 
CM=5THENfiETURN 
GOTO1170 

GOSUB830:M BA%,EA%:PRI 
NT:G0T0117a 

GOSUB830:I BA%,EA%:PRI 
NT:GOTO1170 



GOSUB1330:D ES%,EE%,CW 

%:GOTO1170 

GOSUB1339:A BS%,EE%,CW 

%:G0T0117a 

PRINT: IFCW%=0THENGOSOB 

680 

Al-l:GOSUB79S;ES%=HA%: 

LA=HA:Al=2:GOSUB79a:EE 

%=HA%: RETURN 

GOSUB8 33:CA=3192:LA=57 

343:A1=3:GOSUB8 40:CT%- 

HAl 

G-38 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



QM 1360 C BAI,EA%,CT%:PRINT:GO 
SUB1220:RETURN 

JA 1370 GOSUB830:CA=8192:A1=4: 
GOSUB840:CT%=HA%:T BA% 
,EA%,CT%: PRINT: RETURN 

HD 1380 IFEA>53247THENPRINT" 

{2 SPACES} -DATA SAVE N 
OT ALLOWED ABOVE 5CFFF 
-":PRINT:GOSUB1170 

XK 1390 RETURN 

DQ 1400 TG=TG+1:TG%=128:IFTG>1 
THENTG=3:TGl=0 

AR 1410 POKEi57,TG%:GOSlJfl990:R 

ETURU 

Hugh Rountree lives in Perry, Florida. 



RAM-D 



By Joseph Bolin 

RAM-D is a RAM disk program for saving 
programs under ROM, I/O, and the 
block of memory at 49152 and recalling 
them at speeds 80 times faster than a 
1541 disk drive. You can use a utility, 
store it in RAM-D, run another program, 
and then call back the first one almost in- 
stantaneously. There's no waiting for 
long: disk saves and loads. 

Just remember that a RAfvl disk is vol- 
atile; it's a temporary storage device. 
That means you1l lose the data or pro- 
gram should you turn off your computer 
without first saving it to disk. 

RAM-D is written entirely in machine lan- 
guage for the 64, To enter it, use MLX, 
COMPUTE'S machine language entry pro- 
gram. See "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. When MLX asks for the start- 
ing and ending address, respond with 
the following values. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 0C88 

When you have finished entering it. 
save a copy to disk before exiting. 

Using a RAM Disk 

To run RAM-D, load it and enter SYS 
2051. DEVICE. AUTOSAVE. Device is 
the device number of the RAM disk. It 
can be any device number normally 
used for a disk drive. Using 1 for Auto- 
save automatically stores in RAM-D 
any program as it is loaded off a disk. 
When you access the program for the 
second time, the program is removed 
from RAM-D. This keeps the last pro- 
gram that you've accessed from disk 
ready for reuse in RAM. Enter a to dis- 



able this feature. 

You can ioad and save to RAM disk 
with the normal format, but to scratch 
files, you must type SAVE'S: FILE- 
NAME". DEVICE. Filename is the 
name of the file to be scratched, and 
device is the device number of the 
RAM disk, To erase all the files on the 
RAM disk, type SAVE"N:". DEVICE. 

To list the directory, type 
LOAD''*-". DEVICE. This lists the 
directory to the screen and does not 
erase the program in memory You can 
pause the listing by pressing any con- 
trol key. This listing provides the num- 
ber of bytes in each file, the filename, 
the saved address, and the number of 
bytes free. With no files in RAM-D, it 
will report 24K of space for storage. 

You can also save a specified area 
of memory to the RAM disk by typing 
SAVE-FILENAME". DEVICE. ISA. EA. 
SA is the starting address, and EA the 
ending address. 

You can load a file into a specified 
area of memory from RAM-D by typing 
LOAD"FILENAME".DEVICE ILA. LA is 
the loading address. RAM-D saves the 
load and save vectors, so the program 
can be used with TurboDisk and Tur- 
boSave if you relocate and load them 
first. 

If you want to enable or disable the 
automatic saving feature, type POKE 
3110. 1 to enable or POKE 3110.0 to dis- 
able. To change the device number 
without erasing the disk, then enter 
POKE 3110.DEVICE. To see the gain 
you get with the automatic saving fea- 
ture, enable it and load a program off 
the disk twice. 



RAM-D 

aS01:00 
3809: AD 
0811:83 
0819:42 
8 21:08 
0829:03 
0831:83 
0839:8E 
0841:B7 
0849:A9 
0851:A9 
0859:A9 
0861:3A 
0B69:A0 
O871:0C 
0879:CD 
0881:86 
0889:C9 
0891:4E 



00 AD 
31 03 
8D 41 
0C A9 
8D 3 3 
A9 84 
0E 20 
3E 0C 
BE 3D 
09 8D 
00 20 
84 3D 
0C A9 
8D 3C 
18 60 
3E 0C 
C9 53 
3A D0 
D0 07 



30 03 
8D 40 
0C AD 
77 SD 
03 A9 
85 2B 
FD AE 
20 FD 
OC A9 

31 03 
42 A6 
39 0C 
00 8D 
0C A9 
5C 41 
D0 F6 
D0 0A 
0E 4C 
C8 Bl 



8D 3F 
3C AD 
33 03 
32 03 
C6 8D 
A9 00 
20 9E 
AE 20 
0E 85 
20 59 
4C 7B 
A9 0C 
3B 0C 
00 80 
0C A5 
A0 00 
Ca Bl 
53 0A 
BB C9 



0C A2 
32 35 
8D EC 
A9 DE 
30 E2 
8D 9B 
B7 55 
9E 2D 
2C F5 
03 88 
E3 9F 
8D 51 
A9 El 
84 62 
BA A0 
Bl 7A 
BB EB 
C9 95 
3A B4 



0899 


F3 


BE 


A5 


B9 


F0 


11 


08A1 


0C 


84 


FB 


85 


FC 


20 


08A9 


84 


FD 


8 5 


FE 


4C 


C0 


0831 


2B 


8 5 


FB 


A5 


2C 


85 


08B9 


2D 


85 


FD 


A5 


2E 


83 


08C1 


0F 


0C 


E6 


FD 


D0 


92 


08C9 


A5 


FD 


38 


E5 


FB 


85 


08D1 


FE 


E5 


FC 


85 


04 


A5 


08D9 


65 


03 


48 


A5 


A4 


65 


0851 


a 


48 


A4 


B7 


88 


Bl 


08E9 


05 


38 


10 


F9 


A4 


B7 


08F1 


91 


05 


C8 


A5 


A3 


91 


08F9 


A5 


A4 


91 


05 


C8 


C8 


0901 


05 


88 


68 


91 


95 


ca 


0909 


FB 


91 


05 


C8 


A5 


FC 


0911 


C8 


A9 


00 


91 


05 


98 


0919 


20 


50 


0C 


78 


A9 


34 


0921 


A0 


00 


4C 


39 


09 


4C 


0929 


81 


FB 


91 


A3 


E6 


FB 


0931 


E6 


FC 


E6 


A3 


D0 


02 


0939 


Bl 


FB 


91 


fl3 


A5 


FB 


0941 


D0 


E6 


A5 


FC 


C5 


FE 


0949 


A9 


37 


85 


01 


58 


20 


0951 


18 


60 


4C 


04 


F7 


AD 


0959 


F0 


68 


A6 


BB 


A4 


BC 


0961 


3B 


90 


6F 


A5 


BA 


C9 


0969 


59 


A9 


03 


35 


90 


A4 


0971 


03 


4C 


10 


F7 


a6 


B9 


0979 


F5 


A9 


60 


85 


B9 


29 


B981 


A9 


08 


20 


09 


ED 


A5 


0989 


C7 


ED 


23 


13 


EE 


85 


0991 


90 


4A 


4A 


B0 


BO 


29 


0999 


85 


AF 


BA 


D0 


08 


A5 


09A1 


AE 


A5 


C4 


85 


AF 


AS 


09A9 


FB 


A5 


AF 


85 


FC 


20 


09B1 


99 


03 


4C 


F9 


E9 


86 


0989 


FE 


20 


C0 


08 


A6 


FD 


09CI 


18 


60 


6C 


3F 


0C 


85 


9C9 


68 


D0 


F7 


A5 


BA 


CD 


0901 


D0 


83 


20 


0F 


0C 


A5 


09D9 


19 


A9 


09 


Bl 


7A 


09 


a9El 


0C 


20 


7B 


0C 


85 


FE 


a9E9 


A9 


01 


4C 


FD 


09 


A3 


09F1 


FD 


09 


A0 


01 


A5 


2B 


09F9 


A5 


2C 


85 


FE 


84 


AA 


0AO1 


Bl 


BB 


C9 


5F 


D0 


03 


0A09 


0B 


A6 


BB 


A4 


3C 


20 


0A11 


90 


03 


4C 


CA 


0B 


78 


0A19 


85 


01 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


0A21 


E6 


FB 


D0 


02 


E6 


FC 


0A29 


C5 


A8 


D0 


06 


A 5 


FC 


0A31 


F0 


09 


E6 


FD 


DO 


02 


0A39 


4C 


ID 


0A 


A6 


FD 


A4 


0A41 


AA 


F0 


07 


A9 


37 


85 


0A49 


18 


60 


03 


A6 


2D 


A4 


0A51 


44 


3A 


A9 


01 


85 


AA 


0A59 


A4 


BC 


18 


65 


BB 


90 


0A61 


AA 


C6 


B7 


C6 


B7 


29 


0A69 


90 


03 


4C 


CA 


0B 


A5 


0A71 


E5 


FB 


85 


03 


AS 


A9 


0A79 


85 


04 


A5 


A5 


48 


A5 


0A81 


C8 


93 


85 


A7 


A2 


05 


0A89 


0C 


A4 


A7 


Bl 


AS 


A0 


0A91 


A5 


A5 


A5 


C5 


05 


D9 


0A99 


A6 


C5 


06 


F0 


0A 


A2 


0AA1 


01 


20 


50 


0C 


40 


8A 


0AA9 


85 


A6 


68 


85 


A5 


A0 


0AB1 


A5 


F0 


2C 


20 


08 


0C 


0AB9 


38 


E5 


03 


91 


A5 


08 


0AC1 


E5 


04 


91 


A5 


C8 


Bl 



20 


7B 


A9 


7B 


0C 


10 


08 


AS 


37 


FC 


A5 


A9 


FE 


20 


81 


E6 


FE 


74 


03 


A5 


33 


A3 


13 


E8 


04 


BO 


34 


BH 


91 


4A 


A9 


00 


97 


05 


C8 


B5 


68 


91 


54 


CS 


AS 


60 


91 


05 


F3 


A2 


05 


DF 


85 


01 


82 


7E 


B9 


D0 


DO 


02 


4A 


E6 


A4 


0E 


C5 


FD 


36 


D0 


£0 


A6 


24 


0C 


56 


3D 


0C 


4E 


20 


97 


7E 


08 


D0 


43 


B7 


D0 


42 


20 


AF 


A5 


D5 


F3 


43 


B9 


20 


98 


AE 


A5 


CO 


13 


EE 


56 


C3 


85 


9C 


AE 


85 


5C 


F0 


F4 


B0 


FD 


84 


97 


A4 


FE 


61 


93 


48 


5F 


3E 


0C 


33 


B9 


F0 


7D 


2C 


D0 


DF 


34 


FD 


61 


00 


4C 


00 


85 


FD 


40 


A0 


00 


9A 


4C 


17 


4E 


97 


0B 


AE 


A9 


34 


26 


91 


FD 


E2 


A 5 


FB 


54 


C5 


A9 


IB 


E6 


FE 


18 


FE 


A5 


8C 


01 


58 


ac 


2E 


40 


90 


C8 


98 


50 


01 


C8 


33 


97 


0B 


58 


A3 


38 


35 


E5 


FC 


F4 


A6 


48 


CE 


20 


5A 


OF 


00 


91 


IE 


06 


A5 


10 


A5 


A9 


12 


0A 


68 


12 


00 


Bl 


F0 


Bl 


A5 


D5 


Bl 


A5 


36 


A5 


38 


E6 



0AC9 


:E5 


03 


91 


A5 


C8 


Bl 


A5 


E5 


5C 


0AD1 


:04 


91 


AS 


CS 


C8 


08 


98 


A2 


CA 


0AD9 


:A5 


20 


50 


0C 


40 


AE 


0A 


78 


3D 


0AE1 


:A9 


34 


35 


01 


Bl 


A8 


91 


FO 


E7 


0AE9 


:A5 


Aa 


C5 


A3 


D0 


06 


A5 


A9 


81 


0AF1 


:C5 


A4 


FO 


OF 


E6 


FB 


00 


02 


E8 


0AF9 


E6 


FC 


E6 


A8 


D9 


02 


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2E 


0BO1 


:4C 


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0A 


A9 


37 


85 


01 


58 


BC 


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A5 


FB 


85 


A3 


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FC 


85 


A4 


AC 


0B11 


:20 


24 


0C 


4C 


7B 


E3 


A9 


01 


46 


0B19 


85 


AA 


A9 


84 


85 


A5 


A9 


3C 


3C 


0B21 


85 


A6 


AD 


8D 


92 


D0 


FB 


A9 


27 


0B29 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


90 


Bl 


A5 


36 


0B31 


■F0 


49 


20 


08 


30 


20 


DA 


0B 


38 


0B39 


88 


84 


A7 


AS 


AS 


3B 


E5 


FB 


Fl 


0B41 


AA 


AS 


A9 


E5 


FC 


20 


CD 


BD 


6B 


0B49 


A9 


20 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


22 


20 


78 


0B51 


,D2 


FF 


A6 


A5 


A4 


A6 


29 


68 


68 


0B59 


00 


A 9 


22 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


20 


30 


0B61 


20 


D2 


FF 


A4 


A7 


Bl 


A5 


AA 


80 


0B69 


C8 


Bl 


A5 


OS 


84 


A7 


20 


CD 


62 


0B71 


BD 


A2 


A5 


A5 


A7 


20 


50 


ac 


88 


0B79 


4C 


23 


0B 


A9 


12 


20 


D2 


FF 


31 


0B81 


A5 


A3 


49 


FF 


AA 


AS 


M 


49 


FA 


0B89 


FF 


29 


CD 


BD 


A2 


43 


A9 


3C 


AC 


0B91 


29 


68 


0C 


40 


7B 


E3 


86 


3B 


4C 


0B99 


84 


BC 


A9 


34 


85 


A5 


A9 


30 


C0 


0BA1 


85 


A6 


A0 


00 


Bl 


AS 


F0 


26 


64 


0BA9 


Bl 


A5 


F0 


24 


Bl 


BB 


C9 


2A 


9C 


OBBl 


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40 


C9 


3F 


F0 


4E 


Dl 


AS 


8A 


0BB9 


F0 


4A 


20 


08 


OG 


93 


18 


69 


BB 


0BC1 


06 


A2 


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20 


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0C 


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R3 


29 


0BC9 


0B 


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04 


4C 


37 


A4 


38 


50 


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0BD1 


C4 


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Fg 


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88 


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BB 


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ca 


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20 


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08 


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60 


AD 


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9B 


0011 


00 


8 5 


A3 


AD 


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Al 


0C19 


AD 


39 


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05 


AD 


3A 


00 


8F 


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85 


06 


60 


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0C 


B9 


0C29 


A5 


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8D 


3C 


00 


AS 


OS 


8D 


41 


0C31 


39 


00 


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80 


3A 


00 


60 


CB 


0C39 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


03 


00 


00 


51 


0041 


00 


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20 


42 


59 


54 


45 


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7B 


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20 


46 


52 


45 


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18 


90 


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75 


00 


90 


02 


F6 


01 


95 


00 


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60 


85 


02 


38 


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02 


42 


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01 


95 


00 


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8E 


39 


9069: 


71 


00 


80 


72 


0C 


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00 


B9 


92 


0C71: 


FF 


FF 


F0 


F2 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


EB 


0079: 


D0 


F5 


20 


FD 


AE 


20 


9E 


AD 


30 


0081: 


4C 


F7 


B7 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B4 



Joseph Bolin lives in Rockwell, lowa.n 



Send new product 

announcements 

and/or press releases 

on your Commodore 64/128 

products to 
Tom Netsel c/o COMPUTE. 



TYPING AIDS 

MLX, our machine language entry 
program for the 64 and 128. and 
The Automatic Proofreader are util- 
ities that help you type in Gazette pro- 
grams without making mistakes. To 
make room for more programs, we 
no longer include these labor-saving 
utilities in every issue, but they can 
be found on each Gazette Disk and 
are printed in all issues of Gazette 
through June 1990. 

If you don't have access to a 
back issue or to one of our disks, 
write to us, and we'll send you free 
printed copies of both of these 
handy programs for you to type in. 
We'll also include instructions on 
how to type in Gazette programs. 
Please enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. Send a self-ad- 
dressed disk mailer with postage to 
receive these programs on disk. 

Write to Typing Aids, COM- 
PUTE'S Gazette, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408. 



ONLY ON DISK 

Here's a special program that you'll 
find only on Gazette Disk. 

Unbreakable Cipher 

By James I Jones 
Klondike, TX 

There's no reason to leave your love 
letters lying around for prying eyes to 
read. You may have some financial or 
business data that you'd like to send 
to an associate and know thai it won't 
be read by the wrong people. Use Un- 
breakable Cipher to protect your se- 
cret correspondence. 

You can have this program, our 
PD picks, and all the other programs 
in this issue by ordering the November- 
Gazette Disk. The U.S. price is S9.95 
plus $2.00 shipping and handling. 
Send your order to Gazette Disk, COM- 
PUTE Publications, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408. 



NOVEMBER 1993 COMPUTE G-39 



HOW TO TYPE IN GAZETTE PROGRAMS 



Each month, Gazette publishes pro- 
grams for the Commodore 128 and 64. 
Each program is clearly marked as be- 
ing written for the 128, 64, or both. Be 
sure to type in the correct version for 
your machine, All 64 programs run on 
the 128 in 64 mode. Be sure to read the 
instructions in the corresponding article. 
This can save time and eliminate any 
questions v^hich might arise after you be- 
gin typing. 

At irregular intervals, we publish two 
programs designed to make typing in 
our programs easier: The Automatic 
Proofreader, for BASIC programs, and a 
128 and 64 version of MLX, for entering 
machine language programs. In order to 
make more room for programs, we do 
not print these handy utilities in every is- 
sue of the magazine. Copies of these pro- 
grams are available on every Gazette 
Disk. If you don't have access to a disk, 
write us, and we'll send you free copies 
of both of these programs, Please en- 
close a stamped, self-addressed enve- 
lope. Write to Typing Aids. COMPUTE'S 
Gazette, 324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North Carolina 
27408. 

When entering a BASIC program, be 
especially careful with DATA statements, 
as they are extremely sensitive to errors. 
A mistyped number in a DATA state- 
ment can cause your machine to "lock 
up" (you'll have no control over the com- 



puter). If this happens, the only recourse 
is to turn your computer off and then on, 
erasing what was in memory. This could 
cause you to lose valuable data, so be 
sure to save a program before you run 
it. If your computer crashes, you can al- 
ways reload the program and look for 
the error. 

Special Characters 

Most of the programs listed in each is- 
sue contain special control characters. 
To facilitate typing in any programs 
from Gazette, use the following listing 
conventions. 

The most common type of control char- 
acters in our listings appear as words 
within braces: {DOWN| means to press 
the cursor-down key: |5 SPACES} 
means to press the space bar five 
times. {RVSI means to enter Reverse 
mode by simultaneously pressing the 
Ctrl key and the 9 key. 

To indicate that a key should be shift- 
ed (hold down the Shift key while press- 
ing another key), the character is under- 
lined, For example, A means hold down 
the Shift key and press A. You may see 
strange characters on your screen, but 
that's to be expected. If you find a num- 
ber followed by an underlined key en- 
closed in braces (for example, jS A)), 
type the key as many times as indicated 
(in our example, enter eight shifted A's). 

If a key is enclosed in special brack- 



ets, [<>], hold down the Commodore 
key (at the lower left corner of the key- 
board) and at the same time press the in- 
dicated character. 

Rareiy, you'll see a single letter of the 
alphabet enclosed in braces. This can 
be entered on the Commodore 64 by 
pressing the Ctrl key while typing the let- 
ter in braces. For example, JAj means to 
press Ctrl-A. 

The Quote Mode 

You can move the cursor around the 
screen with the Crsr keys, but you may 
want to move it under program control, 
as in examples like {LEFT} and |HOME| 
in the listings. The only way the comput- 
er can tell the difference between direct 
and programmed cursor control is the 
quote mode. 

Once you press the quote key, you're 
in quote mode. It can be confusing 
when you are in this mode if you 
mistype a character and cursor left to 
change it. You'll see a graphics symbol 
for cursor left. Use the delete key to 
back up and edit the line from the begin- 
ning. Type another quotation mark to get 
out of quote mode. 

If things get too confusing, exit quote 
mode by pressing Return: then cursor 
up to the mistyped line and fix it. If the 
mistake involves cursor movement, how- 
ever, you must press the quote key to 
reenter quote mode. 3 



When You Read: 

(CLR) 

{HOMEl 

{UP} 

{DOWNl 

{LEFT) 

{RIGHT} 

{RVS) 

{OFF) 

(BtKl 

{WHT) 

(RED) 

(CYN| 



Press: 



See: 



SHIFT 


aifHOME 




aaiHOME 


SHIFT 


f CRSR J 



I SHIFT 



I CRSR [ 



— CRSR— »| 



«— CRSR — 



CTRL 


9 


au 






CTRL 


2 


CTRL] 


i 



u 



IM 



When You Read: 

{PUR} 

(GRN) 
{BLU} 
{YELI 

( Fl ! 

( F2 I 

! F3 ( 

{ K } 

{ F5 ) 

{ F6 ( 

{ F7 } 

{ F8 } 



Press: 



CTRL 


^ 




CTRL 


t 




CTRL 


7 



CTRL 



SHIFT 



SHIFT 



SHIFT 


fl 








n 






SHIFT 


1 » 








15 



][Z 



See: 



ss 



When You Read: 

T 



Press: 



See: 



IT 



For Commodore 64 Only 



COMMODORE 


1 


n 


COMMODORE 


n 


COMMODORE 


s 


COMMODORE 


Ul 


COMMODORE 




R 


[COMMODORE 




■1 


1 COMMODORE 1 


7 


u 


I COMMODORE 


8 


■ ■ 

■ ■ 



G-40 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 





kT^if^ 



Fatty Bear and tiis friends have a lot to do before Kayla wakes up. 
Matilda Rabbit's busy witti ttie cake. Gretctien's working on ttie 
decorations. The puppy's getting into mischief, and the garage door 
opener has disappeared. 

Fatty Bears Birthday Surprise™ is an adventure game designed 
especially for children. Children enhance their problem-solving 
skills, while happily exploring Fatty Bear's world; the goals even vary 
in response to your child's actions. 



So, what are you waiting for? Morning's almost here, 
and a bear can only do so much alone. 







imi 












circle Reader Service Number 259 
Humongous Entertainment™ Creating software that doesn't underestimate your child. Available on Disk or CD-ROM 
for Macintosh and IBM PC systems. BRP $49.95 Disk/ $54.95 CD-ROM. To purchase, visit your favorite software retailer 
or order direct from Humongous Enturtainment, 13110 NE 177th P!. Box 180, Woodinville, Wa. 98072. (206) 485-1212. 





■■With Peter Pan, EA^^Kids is doing 
something absolutely new with 
storytelling and giving real meaning 
to the phrase Interactive adventure'. 



-Peter Scisco, Kids and Computers 







•.V.S., 



emember the sense of wonder you felt as 
you watclied Peter Pan discover he could reaily 
fly? Well, in Peter Pan, A Story 
Painting™ Adventure from EA*Kidsr 
it's your child's imagination that 
"^an -::::^'-^, really soars. Boys and girls ages 
5-9 become the "hands of the 
animator," to help Peter save Wendy from the 
evil Captain Hook. Along with the Paintbox 




(Actufl/ computer screen s/iotj 

Palsr children actually change events in the 
story, expanding their reading, problem-solving 
and decision-making skills like never before. 

It's the kind of fun your children will 
return to again and again. Unless of course, 
you're playing it yourself. 
To order a FREE EA^Kids demo disk 
or videotape call I 800 KID-XPRT. 
For IBr* compatibles, Macintosh® and 3D0.® 
Available on floppy disk and CD-ROM. 






^'Hficldf 



The Kios Software Expert* 
Circle Reader Service Number 165 

_)I993 Novotrade InternttmfS^iil'illt'fTglits reserved. EA*Rids, Eleclrotiic Arts, 5tory Painting"'Siid fainlbox Pals are trademarks (i( Electronic Arts. 

IBM, Maciniosh and 3D0 are registered irademarks of Inttrnaiional Business Machines Corp., Ajple Computer. Ire. and The 3D0 Coinpany respectively. 



eiEWS 



ALR EVOLUTION 
IVMPC 

ALR's Evolution IV MFC 
boasts good looks, power, 
and an attractive price. How- 
ever, it's ttie system's ex- 
pandability, quality, and 
great software bundle that 
make it a standout in thie 
crowded MPC market. 

Let's start with ttie basics. 
The standard Evolution !V 
MPC package comes with 
an Intel 486DX/33, 4IvlB of 
RAM, and six drive bays 
(three accessible from the 
front). The system sports six 
16-bit ISA-bus slots, two of 
which can be used with VL- 
Bus extensions and one of 
which can be used with 
ALR's proprietary local-bus 
extension. The ZIF socket 
lets you upgrade the CPU 
with one of Intel's OverDrive 
chips {including the 32- or 
64-bit P24T version of the 
Pentium), and you can up- 
grade memory all the way to 
52MB on the motherboard. 

My review system was ful- 
ly decked out with a 240MB 
Western Digital Caviar 
drive, a VL-Bus ATI fVlach 
32 video adapter, 8MB of 
RAM, and the optional 256K 
cache, which provides zip- 
py performance even in de- 
manding multimedia applica- 
tions. It also came with a 
3'/2-inch floppy drive, a So- 
ny CDU 31-A2 CD-ROM 
drive (the system now ships 
with a Texel DM-3024 dual- 
speed drive), a Media Vi- 
sion Pro AudioSpectrum 16 
sound card, and a Labtec mi- 
crophone. ALR routes the au- 
dio board's sound through 
the PC's speaker (which is 
very good, as PC speakers 
go), and you can fiook up 
your own external speakers. 
I found the system's case sol- 
id and accessible. 

A standout feature is the 
TriCombo card, which occu- 

126 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




ALR's Evolution IV packs great multimedia performance 
into an attractive package with an attractive price. 




The Cyrix Cx436DRx' replacement microprocessor brings 486 
performance and compatibility to your current 386DX system. 



pies the proprietary local-bus 
slot and provides ATI local- 
bus video, a 256K processor 
cache, and an Ethernet net- 
working adapter. 

While a number of manufac- 
turers—even some of the big 
names — have had trouble 
with quality control in the 
form of faulty motherboards, 
short-lived hard drives, and 
similar problems, I encoun- 
tered no such difficulties with 
this MPC. The components 
come from respected, reliable 
manufacturers, and ALR of- 
fers a limited five-year (chas- 
sis, motherboard, and power 
supply)/15-month (labor 
costs and peripherals) warran- 
ty with optional on-site service 
and available extended-war- 
ranty options. While there was 
a longer-than-usual delay in 
switching from graphics to 
text mode on the bundled 
ALR 14-inch noninterlaced 
SVGA monitor, that's only a 
very minor quibble; generally, 
I found it sharp, stable, and 
easy to look at. I liked the 
feel and action of the key- 
board, and the two-button 
mouse worked fine, 

Preinstalled on the system 
are MS-DOS 6, Windows 3.1, 
WinCIM (for access to Com- 
puServe, if you opt for a mo- 
dem), and several CD-ROM ti- 
tles, including Cinemania, 
Works for Windows, Multime- 
dia Beethoven, Bookshelf for 
Windows, Kodak Photo CD AC- 
CESS software, and Micro- 
soft's Multimedia Pack 1,0. If 
you opt for a fax/data mo- 
dem, you'll also receive 
Eclipse Pax for Windows. If 
you'd rather avoid the hassle 
of installing a number of hard- 
ware and software items on 
your new system, this may be 
the MPC for you. I thoroughly 
enjoyed this system and 
found it ready for the most 
demanding applications. ALR 
offers a multitude of system op- 
tions; contact the company 
for a system configured to 



Beat The NFL Coaches 
At Their Ovifn Game. 




Marv Levy, Jimmy Johnson, Bill Parcells, Chuck Knox. Marty Schottenheimer, Bill 
Cowher. These are just a few of the sideline strategists waiting for you on the gridirons of 
NFL Coaches Club™ Football, the most authentic football game ever created for the PC, 

Each gameday, you'll go head-to-head against NFL coaches. Coaches that will be 
cursing themselves as you create your own trick plays, bark out any of 80 offensive and 
80 defensive plays, and hand-pick the players that will carry your team to the Super Bowl. 

This is NFL action so real you'll be scraping the mud from your face. You'll plow through 
the trenches. Shake off bone-crunching tackles, Pertorm acrobatic catches. And choose 
players based on true-to-Iife characteristics like blocking and coverage skills, height, 
weight, and speed. 

No other football game brings more to the playing field. Full 3-D field display lets you 
view the action from every conceivable angle. Detailed instant replay function lets you 
quickly analyze plays. And individual plays or entire games can be saved so you can view 
your greatness (or learn from your mistakes!). 

NFL Coaches Club"" Football from MicroProse. Your chance to learn from the best. 
Then beat them at their own game. 



Create your own NFL team dynasty 
and head to the Super Bow[. 



^^% 



M^ 












Choose players based on 
skills, size, and speed. 





» i 



cNIERTAINfvlENI • SOflWARE 

Seriously Fun Sop^.vare 

e 1993 UmPfflse Soflvrara. Inc. ALL Rights fl6SERV6D. 

NFL Coaclies Club is a Irademarft or the National Football Leagi>e and is licensed 

exdLiSively by Leader Enlerprises, Inc , Orlando, FL 

Cirde Reader Service Number 133 



I To get our free catalog, call 1 -HOO-S/g-PLAV Mon.-Fri., 8:30 am-5:00 pm KT ' 

I or fill out the coupon and mail it to: MicroProse Software, Inc. 

I 180 Lakefront Drive • Dept, DIO • Hunt Valley, MD 21030-2245 . 

I Name: I 



u 



.■Xddrcss: 
Citv: 



_ State: 



. Zip: . 



GAO 



IJ 



REVIEWS 



meet your specific needs. 

MIKE HUDNALL 

ALR 

(BOO) 444-4 ALR 

(714)581-6770 

S3.047— base ISA system with 33- 

MH; 4e6DX and 240MB drive 

$149— 256K cache 

$270— extra 4MB of RAM 

$79— ALR 96/48/24 fax/data 

modem 

Circle Reader Service Number 434 

CYRIX 
CX486DRX2 

It's no fun owning a 386 any- 
more. With today's more pow- 
erful software, 386 ma- 
cfiines feel slow. You could 
sell your 386 and buy a new 
486, or you could buy a new 
486 motherboard and swap 
out your old one. But there's 
a third solution that's much 
!ess complicated. 

Cyrix has a single-chip up- 
grade that can bring 486- 
level performance to your 16- 
MHz, 20-MHz, or 25-MHz 
386DX system. All you do is 
pull out your old CPU {a 
chip puller is included), put 
the new Cx486DRx2 chip in 
its place, install the heat 
sink on top of the chip (20- 
MHz and 25-MHz upgrades 
only), and install the cache 
software (which simply 
turns on the processor's 
cache; it doesn't take up 
any memory). 

The new chip speeds up 
your computer in three 
ways. First, it acts as a 
clock doubter, so your 16- 
MHz machine will run at 32 
MHz, ycur 20-MHz machine 
will run at 40 MHz. or your 
25-MHz machine will run at 
50 MHz. Second, the chip in- 
cludes a built-in IK cache, 
which isn't found on 386 
chips. (A true 486 has a 
built-in 8K cache, which 
gives it a greater advantage 
in this area.) Finally, the 
Cx486DRx2 has an instruc- 
tion set that's compatible 

128 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



with Intel's 486 instruction 
set. According to Cyrix, all 
DOS, 'Windows, and OS/2 
software will work with its up- 
grade chip. 

The upgrade chip 
doesn't include a math 
coprocessor (which the 
486DX has, but the 486SX 
doesn't have). However, it is 



getting the Cyrix 486 up- 
grade chip is the best way 
to speed things up. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Cyrix 

(214) 994-8388 

$299— Cx486DRx= 16/32 

$349— Cx486DRx2 20/40 

$399- Cx4e6DRx= 25/50 

Circle Reader Service Number 435 




Wtng Commanae' Academy leis you crease your own custom 
missions against cunning, feline Kilratlii opponents. 



compatible with Intel's 387 
math coprocessors and Cy- 
rix s own FasMath 83D87 
math coprocessor. 

I tested a Cx486DRx2 20/ 
40 chip on a four-year-old 
ZEOS 386DX system. Be- 
fore I installed the Cyrix 
chip, Norton Utilities 
showed an Intel 20-MHz 
386DX with a speed of 8.9. 
After the installation, Norton 
showed a Cyrix 40-tvlHz 486 
with a speed of 47.9. 'With 
the 386DX, WindSock report- 
ed speeds of CPU: 85, Vid- 
eo: 37, Disk: 82, Memory: 
35, and Overall: 70. With the 
486DRx2, WindSock report- 
ed CPU: 268, Video: 86, 
Disk: 113, Memory: 35, and 
Overall: 160. 

As you can see from the 
WindSock numbers, a faster 
processor can even acceler- 
ate your system's video and 
hard drive performance. 
Short of buying a new moth- 
erboard or a new computer, 



WING 

COMMIANDER 

ACADEMY 

Piloting two ponderous Cross- 
bow attack ships, you and 
your wingman drop out of au- 
topilot at Nav Point 4. As 
you survey the starscape. a 
strange sense of dSja vu 
overcomes you. Two Ra- 
latha capital ships, your pri- 
mary targets, hang motion- 
less in the distance. Be- 
tween you and your targets 
swarm a mess of Kilrathi fight- 
ers, like angry bees protect- 
ing their queen. You give 
Hobbes the order over the 
communication circuit to 
break and attack, then pull 
the ship hard to the right 
and do the same . . . 

That sense of deja vu 
could be caused by a num- 
ber of things. Perhaps you 
spent many hours playing 



one of the first two Wing 
Commander games, and 
you've encountered the fe- 
line Kilrathi before. Or may- 
be it's just the tenth time in 
an hour that you've tried to 
make it through this specific 
mission. Cursing as you ex- 
plode yet again, you have 
no one to blame but your- 
self — after all, in Wing Com- 
mander Academy, you're 
the one who made it so 
tough. 

In Academy, you aren't fly- 
ing in the persona of "old 
blue brow," the familiar hero 
from the preceding games. 
Instead, you're a cadet at 
the Confederation Acade- 
my, Rather than facing actu- 
al combat, you experience 
missions courtesy of a 
holodeck-styie simulator. De- 
signing these missions is up 
to you. 

Academy uses the Wing 
Commander II engine and 
scraps the story line that 
wraps around the missions 
in the earlier games in favor 
of an elegant, albeit simplis- 
tic, mission design editor. 
You design your own mis- 
sions and then play them 
through. Missions can be 
saved to disk and shared 
with friends. Gamers looking 
for cinematic drama won't 
find it in Academy: Wing 
Commander fans, however, 
will find combat scenarios 
limited only by their imagina- 
tion and skill. 

In Design mode, you 
place enemy craft and obsta- 
cles at each navigation 
point as you see fit. There 
are 16 ship types to choose 
from, including two new de- 
signs. Adding variety and 
challenge are asteroids and 
minefields, retrievable data 
pods and ejected pilots, 
and a space station to de- 
fend. You can choose wing 
men— simulated versions of 
the sidekicks from the first 
two games — or choose to 



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Dr.rs SING ALONG 



26 

Classic 

Children's 

Songs 




Sing Along 

With Music & 

Animations 



usic, animations, song lyrics, 
I and musical notation 
combine to make singing 
I along a real treat for children 
and parents. Dr. T's Siiig-A-Lofi}> 
introduces your child to the 
wonders of music! Each song has 
its own unique characters, 
animated stor\' and sound cflccts. 
Notes and lyrics scroll in time 
with the music. Older children 
re-enforce reading skills and !eam 
to read 
music. 
Younger 
children 
love to 
sing and 
watch the 
animations. 



Dr. T's Software 

For information, call 1-800-989-6434. 



Circle Reader Servit^c Numbor 136 




eiEws 



go it alone. The relative skill of each en- 
emy pilot is also selectable. 

Turning tradition on its head, you 
can fly missions as a Kilrathi pilot up 
against Confederation fighters. If you 
just want to dive in and start shooting, 
the Wave mode skips the mission de- 
sign altogether. You face progressively 
tougher ships in progressively larger 
numbers and shoot for the highest 
score. 

Taking the story out of a game is a 
bold move by Origin and a concept 
that would be anathema to many of to- 
day's top designers. Narrative frame- 
work almost always helps to bridge the 
emotional distance between player 
and game. Yet Academy succeeds be- 
cause designing the missions puts 
some of "you" into the game. An add- 
ed benefit is that jettisoning story anima- 
tion lets Academy fit in just under 5MB 
of hard drive space. 

If you're looking for some outer 
space action while you await Wing Com- 
mander 111, you'll find that Wing Com- 
mander Academy is a great, all-action 
playground where you can keep your 
battle skills honed. 

OAVID GERDING 



Origin 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

(512) 335-5200 

$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 436 



SYNDICATE 



The recent trend in science fiction has 
been to paint the near future as a 
dark, dirty dystopia. Electronic Arts' sci- 
ence-fiction strategy game, Syndicate, 
is no exception. Created by Bullfrog, 
which brought us Populous and Power- 
Monger, Syndicate is a dark, bloody, Ri- 
dley Scott-esque strategy game set in 
2096. You take on the role of a pseu- 
dogodfather, riding herd on a crime 
syndicate iooking to cash in on a 
world made ripe for plundering by 
megacorporations. 

The task is simple: You must con- 
quer the globe through a series of cov- 
ert assassination, bloodbath, and per- 
suasion missions. The tools of your 
trade are genetically augmented 
cyborgs, outfitted with a neural control 
device which allows you to alter the 
brain chemistry of the agents, boosting 
their intelligence, perception, and adre- 
naline levels. While the agents battle it 
out on the streets of tomorrow's cities, 
you hover safely overhead in an ultra- 
modern airship. 

You conquer each territory by com- 



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l<»-|g,|B-|(t^|. ■•■■■■■ 



The Windows version of Dr. Schueler's 
Home Medical Advisor may be the 
closest thing to a modern house call. 



OOPS! 



In our August 1993 issue, we ran a 
review of the Windows version of 
Doctor Schueler's Home Medical Ad- 
visor, but we showed a screen shot 
from the DOS version. Here's the 
Windows screen shot that should 
have appeared with the review. 

Doctor Schueler's Home Medical Advisor, 
Windows Version 

Pixel Perfect 

(800) 788-2099 

(407) 779-0310 

$87,50 

Circle Reader Service Number 437 



pleting a specific mission plan, and as 
your spliere of influence grows, so 
does your revenue from taxes, Reve- 
nue is important, because the only way 
to succeed in ttie series of increasingly 
difficult missions is to fiave stronger 
and faster agents armed witfi more 
and better firepower. Tfie cyborg 
agents can be updated in any number 
of ways, from cybernetic limbs to en- 




Syndicate's futuristic cities are full of 
numerous deadly challenges. 

hanced computerized brains. Weap- 
ons range from simple automatic pis- 
tols to high-powered laser rifles and 
beyond. To have access to these 
toys, though, you must research the 
technology, and as any good tech- 
nohead knows, research costs serious 
money. 

Once the agents have been outfitted 
with the tools of the trade necessary for 
the mission, they're delivered to the 
scene of the mission, and you assume 
control. The play screen is divided in- 
to three main windows. The first gives 
control of the agents, either singly or 
as a group. You can alter the agents' 
chemical levels and may even choose 
to induce a state of controlled panic, 
pumping all drug levels to maximum. 
When pumped up, the cyborgs really 
fly, but when the drug wears off, they 
slow down considerably. The second 
window is an overhead sensor display 
which shows the direction of the olDJect 
or person that is your mission objective 
and indicates the location of civilians, 
police, and rival cyborgs. The main win- 
dow shows a skewed 3-D overhead 
view of the city, rendered in crisp, 
brooding Super VGA. The attention to 
details — such as working levitation 
cars, magnetic-levitation trains, and ne- 
on billboards — is impressive, but the cit- 
ies are just a touch too clean and 
sharp-edged for such a bleak future. 

You control the movement of the 
agents, as well as which weapons 
they shoulder and whom they fire up- 
on. Often missions become bloo- 
dbaths, with rival agents and police of- 
ficers descending from all corners. The 
Al is decent, although not brilliant. I do 
like the way the civilians run away 
when you level your sights on them. 

Syndicate is a lot of fun. The game 



Most People Caift See a 

Single Reason to Try 

Something Besides SimCity* 

We See 2000. 

Coming this Christmas. 



M(A X I S 



Circle Reader Service Number 158 



The IHWil!lll , I if .1 J and 
Improvisation 
Program 



Hifi'Hofi 






Add echoes and pitch 
fihift to the mu&tc . 



Tempo Slider 

lets you control 

the groove 



So\o pads trlq^er 
aupplted rap 

samplee or your 
own soundel 



Flay melodies 
or hfp-hop loops with 
PCjoyfltick or mouse 






,0D' 






y y i\^^\^^"'^^ Kft, *-!^ 



Change drum, base &nd oynth 
patterns as the mueic plays 



Control the Mix of 

Drums. 0a&9. Synth 

and 3oIo parts 



■ Record your 
performance 

Backward play, 

double flpeed, 

retrJggerand loop 

DJ turntable 

effecte 

Trigger flamples, 

melody parts or 

drum loops with the 

computer keyboard 




Circte Reader Service Number 192 




Dare 



To TaKe The 



Challenge 

or thousand, oi 

A 




J kin to the 
.nefarious 
Rubik's Cube, 
but witli over 
120 levels, you 
must restore 
order from 
chaos in this 
challenging 
strategy game, 

MAC or PC Ultimate 
Computer System 

■cl.l:lil,l,MJIJ.lJJ»H 
Hot Software 



l.OOO's of Honorable Mentions 



COGITO T-Shlrts 

Q ^^ ^^ See your local 
^ ^B ^B retailer, or call 

« COGITO 1-800-453-7671 

!^ Ext 120 

Play COGITO and Win Prizes! 

irs simple. Fill oul an entry lorm, included in all COGITO fB&- 
ages, return it wilh your dated sales receipt (price circled) M a 
25-word essay on why you enjoy playing COGITO. As a special 
bonus, if you reach level 120, write the password code on your 
entry form. anC vie'll send you an "I Beat COGITO" T-Shirt. 
atKOlulely free (a SI 5.95 ualue). Bu: tiufry, the contest runs 
from June 1 to Deramfcier 31 . 19S3, Void whece protiibiled. 

INLINE SOFTWARE 

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203-435-4995, Fax: 203-435-1091 



CQGITO is a registered trademark or 

Atreid Conce[>ts. S.A. 
Availatjie tor Macintosh and Windows 




eiEws 



Circle Reader Service Number 155 



is easy to learn, but the missions are 
challenging enough to keep the inter- 
est level high. While scenarios are cen- 
tered on offensive firepower, you've 
got to develop a unique defensive strat- 
egy for each mission. You may for in- 
stance, need to split your agents, hid- 
ing one behind a corner to rush in and 
flank the enemies. As you battle, weap- 
ons run dry pretty quickly, but you can 
always use the rather nasty tactic of 
cop hunting. One shot will take a police- 
man out, and your agent can then re- 
trieve a fully loaded shotgun to pursue 
more important targets, This isn't a 
game to use as a morality lesson for 
the kids — it's bloody it requires you to 
be ruthless, and some people may 
take issue with the use of drugs to con- 
trol your agents, But it's a ball to play 

PAUL C, SCHUYTEMA 

Electronic Arts 

(800) 245-4525 

S59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 43S 

PANASONIC KX-P2023 

If I had the same luck with light switch- 
es as I do with DIP switches, I'd have 
to learn to read in the dark and sleep 
with the lights on. So I was pleasantly 
surprised to see the Panasonic KX- 
P2023 dot-matrix printer has no DIP 
switches at all. None. The printer 
comes with a 3Vs floppy disk with a 
DOS setup program that takes the 
place of the missing — but not missed — 
DIP switches and lets you control the 
printer from your computer 

The control panel on the printer is 
easy to understand and operate — not 
one of the five buttons has more than 
two functions, and they're all clearly la- 
beled. In addition to simplicity, the 
P2023 offers 24-pin quality and sever- 
al useful features, including paper park- 
ing, tear-off advance, and automatic 
loading for both single-sheet and trac- 
tor-fed paper, It has four letter-quality 
typefaces resident, and with 360x360 
dpi resolution, TrueType and other 
graphic soft fonts print beautifully, al- 
beit slowly 

The P2023 offers a Super Quiet 
print mode; but it's an inherantly quiet 
printer even in standard mode, and I 
don't think the slight reduction of print- 
ing noise in Super Quiet mode is 
enough to justify its slower printing, 

In spite of its quiet, easy operation, 
the P2023 can arouse some typical dot- 
matrix frustrations. If you like precise 
margins, you can expect to fiddle with 
your software's margin settings and the 



paper position for each application 
that uses its own phnter driver. The in- 
cluded Windows 3.1 driver offers great- 
er control over default settings than the 
printer's DOS setup program (it offers 
Epson and IBM printer emulations), so 
once you get the paper positioned and 
margins tweaked, you shouldn't have 
to adjust them each time you change 
Windows applications. 




The KX-P2023 comes with disk-based 
software for easy configuration. 

On the printer I tested, tractor-paper 
jams were another frequent annoy- 
ance. The problem appeared to be the 
clear-plastic paper guide above the plat- 
en, which often caught the top edge 
the paper. (It didn't seem to cause a 
problem with single sheets) Avoid the 
problem by swinging the guide out of 
the way to keep the first sheet from 
catching. 

Paper feeding problems aside, the 
KX-P2023 is a good choice for home 
or small-business use if you want to fore- 
go the extra expense of an ink-jet or if 
you need to print multi-copy forms. 

PHILLIP MORGAN 

Panasonic 
(800) 222-0584 
$249.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 439 

THE NORTON UTILITIES 
7.0 

The Norton Utilities 7,0 is Symantec's 
counterpoint to DOS 6, DoubleSpace, 
Stacker, and SuperStor. It's true that 
you'll find minor improvements in most 
of the 7.0 utilities, but if you're using 
DOS 6 and one of these compression 
programs, you'll have more reason to 
upgrade. 

The best of 7.0's compression-sawy 
utilities is the Norton Disk Doctor 
(NDD). NDD is a one-stop hard disk 
hospital that offers everything from di- 
agnostics to surgery— all packaged in 
an automated, easy-to-use shell, The 
new NDD has ail the powerful discov- 
ery and repair tools of its predeces- 
sors, plus it's aware of compressed 



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Circle Reader Service Nu 







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^11 Eiitertainincnt 



HOLLYWARE ENTERTAINMENT P.O. Box 9148 Marina Del Rey, Ca. 90295 [310) 822-9200 
See your Local Software Retailer or call HOLLYWARE Ervtertainmenl. Copyright © 1993 HOLLYWARE Entertalnmervt, Trademark TM 1993 Sony Electronic Publishing. 



eiEws 



drives and handles them in- 
telligently. If you ask NDD to 
scan a compressed drive, 
for example, it not only 
scans the compressed 
drive but also scans the 
host drive and tests the da- 
ta structures on the com- 
pressed drive. 

It's worth noting, hov^/ev- 
er, that with Stacker, I've en- 
countered some problems 
that NDD couldn't fix but 
Stac's Check could, fvtany us- 
ers run NDD in their AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT files to catch disk er- 
rors on startup, so that they 
can be fixed before they 
multiply. 

Like NDD, SpeedDisk is 
hip to compressed drives, 
but you might feel safer us- 
ing the defragger that 
comes with your compres- 
sion program. 

Of the other utilities, the 
most improved is Disk Edi- 
tor. This program lets you ed- 
it your hard disk on the phys- 
ical level (sides, tracks, and 
sectors), the organizational 
level (partitions, boot sec- 
tors, and FATs), and the log- 
ical level (files and directo- 
ries). New in 7.0 is ARM, Ad- 
vanced Recovery Mode, an 
automated system that 
makes recovering data easi- 
er. Learning to use Disk Ed- 
itor may well save your ba- 
con some day. 

Arrrrrrrgh! That's the 
sound most of us make 
when we accidentally delete 
a file, Peter Norton made his 
reputation in 1982 by turn- 
ing this sound into a sigh of 
relief with Undelete, Natural- 
ly, no edition of The Norton 
Utilities would be complete 
without undeleting tools, 
and this version boasts new 
incarnations of Undelete 
and SmartCan, which is the 
Norton equivalent of Delete 
Sentry in DOS 6. 

To mention just a few of 
the remaining tools, you'll 
find NOGS (a powerful COM- 

134 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



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The updated version of File Find is just one of many enhanced 
utilities included with The Norton Utilities 7.0. 




Funny, but sometimes gory, animated sequences play v/iien you 
capture a piece in Chess Maniac 5 Billion and 1. 



MAND,COM replacement 
based on COMPUTE 
Choice Award winner 
4D0S), much improved sys- 
tem diagnostics, a new ver- 
sion of File Find, and my fa- 
vorite, NCD, the Norton 
Change Directory, I 
wouldn't be caught dead at 
the DOS prompt without 
NCD. 

For a set of time-tested 
DOS utilities, The Norton Util- 
ities is a solid choice. And if 
you're using DOS 6 or a 
disk compression program, 
it's definitely worth owning, 

CLIFTOr^ KARNES 

Symantec 

(800)441-7234 

SI 79 

$49 (upgrade) 

S99 (for DOS 6 owners) 

Circle Reader Service Number 440 



NATIONAL 
LAMPOON'S 
CHESS MANIAC 5 
BILLION AND 1 

Chess Maniac is a chess pro- 
gram that refuses to take it- 
self seriously. In a market 
dominated by programs 
with an emphasis on speed 
and strength, a chess game 
with a definite sense of hu- 
mor is a welcome break. 

The manual for Chess Ma- 
niac, written in the style of 
National Lampoon maga- 
zine, is a delightful parody 
of everything pompous 
about intense chess play- 
ers; however, the program it- 
self is disappointing. It 
ships on 12 disks and re- 



quires 27MB of hard drive 
space — the installation proc- 
ess took over two hours on 
my system. Like too many 
games, it requires EMS, so I 
had to reconfigure my start- 
up files to play. 

The game Is a fairly sim- 
ple chess game which of- 
fers a choice of standard or 
animated character sets in ei- 
ther two- or three-dimension- 
al views. You choose from 
ten opponent strength levels 
(the opponents tend to be 
weaker than those in other 
chess programs). Of 
course, if Chess Maniac 
was the chess program that 
grabbed your attention at 
the local computer empori- 
um, you may be more inter- 
ested in watching the on- 
screen antics of the chess 
pieces than in searching for 
a cybernetic Bobby Fischer 
anyway. 

The pieces capture each 
other in unusual ways, rang- 
ing from a deathly lambada 
by the belly-dancing pawn 
to gory decapitations by the 
sickle-wielding rook. Fre- 
quently, animated distrac- 
tions flash across the 
screen, and the program oc- 
casionally cheats by steal- 
ing your pieces. This is an in- 
teresting feature, but it isn't 
very useful to your computer 
opponent, since you can eas- 
ily use the program's board 
editor to get your pieces 
back. Moving the pieces 
with the mouse can be very 
difficult, and at times it 
seems impossible to place 
a piece on the correct 
square. Two-dimensional 
and standard chess sets 
are available to help keep 
you oriented, as the charac- 
ter board is often cluttered 
and difficult to see. 

Chess Maniac doesn't 
play world-class chess, but 
it does add some hilarious 
touches to what can be a 
staid, stuffy game. Unfortu- 




"Nothing will 
stop me this 
time!!" 








HOLLYWARE Entertainment in 
association with Hanna-Barbera 
bring you the "cult classic 
cartoon", Jonny Quest*. True 
to the television series, this 
game emphasizes fast action 
and a unique storyline. 

Join Jonny and Team Quest as 
they fearlessly trek through 
the Guatemalan jungle as 
they seek to solve the 
mysterious "Curse of the 
Mayan Warrior". 

Game Features include: 
A 3D raised perspective 
for exploration, an icon 
controlled interface, 
combat sequences, 
full cast of interactive 
characters, a full 
sound track, stun- 
ning graphics, and 
literally hours of < 
entertainment. 

Available for IBM 
PC and compati 
ble machines. 

Check your 
local retail 
stores for Gear 
Works and other 
HOLLYWARE Games. 

circle Reader Service Number 119 




»i5}iWi^-^'"'^-^i»iW 



HOLLYWARE ENTERTAINMBIT 

P.O. iox 9148 Marina Del Rey, Ca. 90295 

(3101822-9200 

Copyright © 1993 HOLLYWARE Entertainment. Copyright © 1993 Hanna-Bartiera Productions, Inc. See your Local Software Retailer or call HOU.YWABE Entertainment 



REVIEWS 



nalely, the difficulty of dis- 
cerning piece positions, 
along witfi the stiff fnard 
drive requirements, puts a 
bit of a damper on [be fun. 

JIM SMITH 

Speclrum HoloByte 
(800) B95-GAME 
$69.95 (disk version) 
$59 95 (CD-ROM version) 
Circle Reader Service Number 441 

BATTLE CHESS 
4000 

Not long ago, Interplay re- 
vamped ctiess, giving the 
classic game a whole new 
look and feel. Instead of sto- 
ic bishops and banal 
queens of plastic, ivory, or 
stone, the original Battle 
Chess brought pieces to lus- 




Interplay's spaced-out Battle Chess 4000 takes the classic 
animated chess challenge into a weird, distant chess future that's 
tuit ol robots, aliens, and futuristic humanoids. 



cious, violent life and 
breathed a bit of magic into 
the standard affairs of play. 
Today. Interplay takes us far 
beyond the medieval visions 
of its earlier offering, beyond 
the Asian feel experienced 
in its Chinese variant, and 
headlong into an unearthly fu- 
ture. A.D. 4000, here we 
come! 

If you're familiar with cias- 
sic chess, you'll be right at 
home in Battle Chess, The 
primary graphic innovation 
is obvious, with each piece 
a futuristic humanoid of 
some sort. These pieces pos- 
sess their own unique char- 
acteristics: rough-and-tum- 
bie queens that always 
mean business, leechlilie 
pawns that squish around 
the board, self-assured bish- 



YDURMIDEA DF A GDDD TIME 



IS SITTING ALDNE IN THE DARK, 



FIGHTING DFF EVIL FORCES 



TIL THE SUNBCDMES UP 




ops that practice a science 
so advanced it seems magi- 
cal. Wtien the pieces clash, 
a combat sequence is cer- 
tain to follow, so keep your 
eyes on the screen. In Bat- 
tle Chess 4000 these com- 
bat sequences run on the hi- 
larious side. The rook — 
which transforms from a ti- 
ny, inert form into a tower- 
ing, ambling robot — seems 
to have the greatest sense 
of humor. Unfortunately, the 
combat ends as you might 
predict: the attacking piece 
always wins. This predetermi- 
nation, common to a,ll ver- 
sions of Battle Chess, 
marks the ceiling for innova- 
tion. Everyone knows a mon- 
ster robot will squash a 
leech. As a variant. Interplay 
could offer chess with more 



tactical considerations, 
such as how many attacks a 
rook can sustain before col- 
lapsing or how many at- 
tacks a bishop can make be- 
fore he needs a recharge. 
Even in A.D. 4000, Battle 
Chess remains merely com- 
puter chess with impressive 
graphics. 

The graphics here are out- 
standing. The SVGA version 
provides extreme detail, 
right down to the grimaces 
and smirks on the pieces' 
outsize faces. The overall 
look seems a bit cartoonish. 
but that, in turn, makes the 
explosions, decapitations, 
and general violence more 
acceptable. Some may find 
it disturbing that both this 
game and Spectrum Holoby- 
te's National Lampoon's 



Chess Maniac 5 Billion and 
1 both feature violence at 
the level of decapitation. 

An outstanding array of op- 
tions including moves by 
the book, forced moves for 
the computer, and hints on 
demand makes Battle 
Chess 4000 a chess game 
for everyone. It allows you to 
take back moves, explore 
what-if possibilities, and 
choose from a list of more 
than 300,000 moves, When 
the combat animations lose 
their appeal, you can acti- 
vate the standard two-dimen- 
sional playing field, the famil- 
iar face of computer chess. 
We can hope, however, that 
the next version will allow us 
to adjust the speed of the an- 
imations. While watching the 
rook unfold into a robot and 



walk across the screen 
proves initially delightful, af- 
ter only a game or two, the 
time required for the anima- 
tion IS just aggravating, 

If you haven't encoun- 
tered Battle Chess before, 
you might want to pick up a 
copy of Battle Chess 4000. 
If your tastes run toward the 
more exotic or to the medie- 
val, consider the other mem- 
bers of the product line. Any 
version of Battle Chess pro- 
vides a worthy computer op- 
ponent for potential grand 
masters. 

DAVID SEARS 



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REVIEWS 

KIPLINGER'S a-SIWlPLY 
MONEY 

Some would say that you'd have to 
give away a new program to get any 
kind of market penetration in today's ul- 
tracompetitive PC software market- 
place. That's exactly what Computer As- 
sociates decided to do with its new 
personal finance manager program: 
Through November 4, 1993. the com- 
pany IS giving away up to a million cop- 
ies of Kiplinger's CA-Simply Money. 
The only charge is a $6.95 fee for post- 
age and handling. 

The incredible price doesn't mean 
you're stuck with a limited, special- 
version package, either. It's the full- 
blown package, complete with a thick, 
heavy, and well-written reference man- 
ual. CA-Simply Money is a personal fi- 
nance manager that also helps you 
make decisions about mortgages, refi- 
nancing, retirement, debt payoff, invest- 
ments, college tuilion, and even house- 
hold help and payroll. Along with the 
usual electronic check register, the pro- 
gram includes the Kiplinger Financial 
Advisor, which tracks all your transac- 
tions and offers you personalized finan- 
cial advice. 

CA-Simply Money runs under Win- 
dows 3.1 and provitdes a simple, icon- 
based user interface. Instead of forc- 
ing you to scroll through long lists of 
accounts looking for the one you 
need, CA-Simply Money provides 
Browsers: typing one or more letters pro- 
duces a pop-up window which con- 
tains a list of related buttons, catego- 
ries, or classifications. This makes re- 
cording transactions much faster and 
easier. And you can easily call up any 
of 50 preprogrammed reports which 
provide quick, useful information 
about your accounts to help control 
and direct financial matters. 

For the novice in financial 
recordkeeping, CA-Simply Money 
goes a step past the automatic budg- 
eting systems of other financial pro- 
grams by automatically prompting for 
repetitive payments and drafts. Repet- 
itive transactions are recorded so that 
payees and account distributions are 
processed automatically You'll have to 
compute percentages manually lor 
transactions involving a home office or 
automobile that's used for business pur- 
poses, though: it would be nice if the 
program had a data feature that 
would compute these automatically 

The Financial Advisor feature pro- 
vides context-sensitive advice and com- 
ments written by the prestigious Kiplin- 



ger editorial staff. Its handy Alert fea- 
ture can optionally pop up whenever 
you start Windows, warning you when 
you need to take care of pending items 
such as payments or deposits. Finan- 
cial Advisor will warn you if a recurring 
transaction seems overly large or 
small, alerting you, for example, if your 
normally $80 phone bill jumps to $553. 
The Advisor feature looks at your cur- 




Kiplinger's CA-Simply l\/loney is a powerful, 
but easy to learn, finance program, 

rent financial situation and offers tips 
for saving money. For instance, it 
might advise you to take out a home eq- 
uity loan to pay off your credit cards, 
lowering the amount of interest you pay 
each month. Unfortunately, the finan- 
cial advice can't currently be printed 
out for offline review. 

I did run into a few quirks when us- 
ing the program. Check numbers ar- 
en't automatically assigned when you 
enter transactions, a limitation which a 
company representative said will be cor- 
rected in a future release. Also, when 
I entered after-the-fact transactions, au- 
tomated date functions became confus- 
ing, making entries more difficult than 
necessary 

CA-Simply Money imports and ex- 
ports files in Quicken format, exports to 
any tax-exchange-format (TXF) tax prep- 
aration program, and can use DDE to 
communicate with databases and 
spreadsheets. Of course, you can 
print checks on your printer, but CA- 
Simply Money also works with Prodi- 
gy's BillPay USA system to pay bills 
electronically You can also use it with 
CompuServe's online financial data- 
base and stock quote system to get up- 
dates on stock prices and live financial 
advice. 

For the lucky million or so purchas- 
ers who order the program before No- 
vember 4, CA-Simply Money Is the 
least expensive finance manager pro- 
gram available. But CA-Simply Money 
is by far the easiest-to-use, most ad- 
vanced financial recordkeeping and 
money management package availa- 
ble today — so it's worth taking a look at 
even at the full retail price. 

ALFRED C GIOVETTt 



138 COIulPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



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STYLUS 800 



The Stylus 800, a 48-ri02zle ink-jet print- 
er from Epson, was hard al work in my 
office just minutes after it arrived. I had 
been using my 24-pin dot-matrix print- 
er to print several letters, but I decid- 
ed to finish the job with the new Epson. 
All I did was disconnect the printer ca- 
ble and plug it into the Stylus 800. 
which performed fiawlessly. I had to ad- 
just the margins from my word proces- 
sor, but I never even switched printer 
drivers. 

Many older applications may not 
have a Stylus 800 driver, but the man- 
ual suggests more than a dozen Epson 
SQ- and LQ-series drivers that should 
work with most applications. I had no 
problem printing out banners, corre- 
spondence, and graphics with the driv- 
er that I had used with my dot-matrix 
printer. For convenience, the Stylus 
package includes drivers for ten pop- 
ular applications, including Windows 
3.1, AutoCAD 2.5 or higher, WordPer- 
fect 5.1 or higher, Microsoft Word for 
DOS 5.5, and Lotus 1-2-3 3.1 and 
3.1-1-. 

The Stylus 800 delivers crisp 360- 
dpi text and graphics. Overall print qual- 
ity is not quite laser-sharp, but it's pret- 
ty darned close. The drop-in ink car- 
tridge is rated at 700 pages with 1000 
characters per page. I've been crank- 
ing out page after page for weeks now, 
and the print quality is still high. When 
the ink supply is low. a light on the pan- 
el lets you know. Replacing a cartridge 
shouldn't put much of a dent in your 
budget: the suggested retail price of a 
new one is less than $20. 

You can load as many as 100 
sheets of paper into the SOO's built-in 
paper holder. This is fine for most print- 
ing jobs. If you prefer, you can feed sin- 
gle sheets and envelopes manually with- 
out disturbing the other paper. 

Paper quality does affect print qual- 
ity, however. If the paper is porous or 
rough, you may see some blurring. 
Most conventional computer paper 
works fine. Should the print quality 
start to diminish, you can press two but- 
tons on the control panel to clean the 
printhead. This simple 30-second pro- 
cedure assures a good stream of ink 
through the nozzles. 

The ink-jet technology makes the Sty- 



140 COfjlPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 





I 

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Ctfcle Reader Sereico Number 132 " ii^^i.^ 





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REVIEWS 



lus quiet and reasonably fast. Printing 
speed is rated at 180 characters per 
second. The compact size lets [he Sty- 
lus fit easily into most any work area. 

The Stylus has seven built-in charac- 
ter fonts; four of them are scalable 
from 8 to 32 points in 2-point incre- 
ments. There's also an economy 
mode that uses less ink for draft cop- 
ies and a condensed mode that's 
handy for printing spreadsheets. Many 
of the printer's controls can be set by 
your program rather than from the con- 
trol panel. 

Internal settings control the charac- 
ter tables for different language appli- 
cations and similar settings. If your soft- 
ware has problems printing scalable 
font text combined with graphics, the 
Stylus has a mixed text and graphics 
mode that should help. There's even a 
setting for using the printer with sever- 
al computers on a network. 

If you're used to the large size of 
many dot-matrix or laser printers, you 
may wonder about the strength and re- 
liability of the Stylus. Don't let its small 
footprint and light weight fool you. 
This little gem is a real workhorse. It's 
proved itself in my office. 

TOM NETSEL 



Epson America 
(800) 922-8911 
$449 

Circle Reader Service Number 444 



THUNDER BOARD 

Do you find that hearing "bleep, beep, 
bloop, buzz" sort of ruins the fantasy 
when you're playing your favorite flight 
simulator? Are you tired of watching 
your computer grind to a halt every 
time the Windows sound driver plays a 
digitized sound? It's time to join the mul- 
timedia party and purchase a sound 
card. If you're looking for a quality 
sound card at a low price, check out 
Media Vision's Thunder Board. 

This haif-size 8-bit ISA card includes 
an Ad Lib-compatible 11 -voice FM syn- 
thesizer and supports 22-kHz digital au- 
dio. The back of the card has audio in- 
put and output jacks, a volume-control 
dial, and a joystick port. An internal con- 
nector allows you to mix sound from a 
CD-ROM drive or Pro AudioSpectrum 
card. 

The card is advertised as being ful- 
ly compatible with the industry-stan- 
dard Sound Blaster It worked perfectly 
with all the games with which I tried it. 
as well as with Windows, using the 
Sound Blaster setting. And like Win- 
dows, many games now directly sup- 



144 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



port the Thunat Lsoard as well ;_ve 
seen a few reports of problems witf -al- 
con 3.0 and tht Thunder Boar;- in 
some systems, tut 't worked fine with 
Falcon when I tried it. Hardware com- 
patibility is no proL)lem; the board func- 
tioned perfectly in both a 16-MHz 
386SX and a 66-MHz 486DX2 system 
and even in an Amiga 4000 with a 
386SX Bridgeboard. Dynamic filtering 
on the digital inputs and outputs 
makes for sound about as clean and 
crisp as you can expect from an 8-bit 
sound system. 

You can edit digitized sound files us- 
ing the bundled Thunder Master soft- 
ware. The real fun comes, though, 
when you plug a microphone into the 
input jack and sample your own 
sounds. Your kids will love it, for exam- 
ple, if their own voices welcome you to 
Windows when you start up your sys- 
tem. You can save disk space by com- 
pressing sounds at a 2 : 1,3: 1, or 
4 : 1 ratio; the Thunder Board will de- 
compress the sounds in realtime. 

If you're looking for a card just to 
play With sampled sounds or add 
some background music to your 
games, a 16-bit card is probably over- 
kill. For banishing beeps and buzzes, 
the Thunder Board is an 8-bit bargain. 

DEr^NY ATKIN 



Media Vision 

(800} 845-5870 

(510) 770-8600 

S129 

Circle Reader Service Number 445 



MICHAEL JORDAN IN 
FLIGHT 

Air Jordan is flying Electronic Arts off 
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The one-player game lands you in 
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camera angles, instant replays, high- 
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Barr's end-of-game stats. 

The designers depart from previous 
efforts in the genre with full-size animat- 
ed players, digitized from live-action vid- 
eo. No rotoscoped, computer-en- 
hanced characters here; you see and 





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REVIEWS 



control photorealist images 
of actual players. The tech- 
nique is visually stunning, 
but the task of simultaneous- 
ly animating six digitized fig- 
ures weighs heavily on sys- 
tem resources. Don't expect 
smooth play on anything 
less than a 33-rviHz 386 ma- 
chine with as much expand- 
ed memory as you can mus- 
ter. The game also offers 
limited support for SVGA 
cards. Hi-res mode looks 
great, but it's virtually unplay- 
able on an average PC, 
with characters moving as if 
glued to the floor. 

True to its roots in street 
basketball, gameplay is most- 
ly improvised, featuring only 
four preset offensive plays. 
Unfortunately, there's no pro- 
vision for designing your 
own shots. You can control 
either Jordan exciusively or 
the player closest to the 
ball. Jordan's trademark 
moves are all here, but un- 
less you're next to the buck- 
et, control is limited to gener- 
ic passing, jumping, and at- 
tempted steals. One of the 
game's best attributes is its 
crisp sampled sound ef- 
fects, including Jordan's 
own colorful digitized asides 
during the heat of play; 
"Thanks for the Nike post- 
er!" he exclaims when he 
makes a particularly pretty 
jump shot. 

Given the power to drive 
its high-end graphics en- 
gine, Michael Jordan in 
Flight soars beyond any 
hoops action seen on the 
computer screen. However, 
the game's scant features 
and unfinished, experimen- 
tal feel suggest that the 
best may be coming in fvli- 
chael Jordan II. 

SCOTT A, MAY 

Electronic Arts 
(800) 245-4525 
$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 44S 

146 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



THE OREGON 
TRAIL 

Migrating westward across 
the United States in the 
1840s was a hardship few 
of us today can appreciate. 
When you consider the 
treacherous traii through the 



sions to make and hard- 
ships to overcome before 
reaching Oregon's Willam- 
ette Valley. 

On the trail, you must 
hunt for food, cross rivers, re- 
pair your wagon, rest in or- 
der to heal sick compan- 
ions, fight bad weather, and 
handle any number of other 




The Oregon Trail, one of the first educanonai computer games, is 
available in a new VGA edition. 



wilderness between Missou- 
ri and Oregon — a trail 
fraught with danger, sick- 
ness, and even death — it's 
a wonder this great country 
ever managed to grow from 
sea to shining sea. While 
the trip today is as easy as 
hopping on the interstate, 
MECC's Oregon Trail (in a 
new deluxe VGA edition) on 
your computer will let you ex- 
perience the triais that the pi- 
oneers faced on the 2000- 
mile journey across Ameri- 
ca's unsettled frontier. 

You start your journey by 
assigning your character 
one of eight occupations; 
your choice determines the 
game's overall difficulty. 
Then it's off to Matt's Gener- 
al Store, where you pur- 
chase supplies, including ox- 
en, clothes, bullets, food, 
and various wagon parts. 
Once supplied, you hit the 
road and hope for the best. 
You and your four compan- 
ions will have many deci- 



difficulties. Disasters, too, 
need to be dealt with. You 
never know, for example, 
when a fire in your wagon 
may destroy supplies or 
when death will strike sick 
companions. Luckily, you 
can stop at various land- 
marks and forts along the 
way to rest and stock up on 
supplies. The online guide- 
book provides historical 
background on these nine- 
teenth century locales. In ad- 
dition, you can talk to peo- 
ple during your travels to 
gather information. 

In this new VGA edition, 
the Macintosh-like displays 
feature a colorful miniwin- 
dow that shows a map of 
your journey or a graphic of 
the current landmark. Digit- 
ized sound effects have 
been added to the program, 
although they're sparse; 
they include simple effects 
such as gunshots and wag- 
on wheels breaking. Still, 
the new graphics add much 



to a classic educational 
game, a game that's easy 
for older elementary-school 
children to learn and interest- 
ing enough for adults to en- 
joy as well. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 



MECC 

(800) 685-6322 

(612) 569-1500 

$59-95 

Cirda Header Service Number 447 



A PLACE FOR MY 
STUFF 

A Place for My Stuff is just 
what its name implies: a 
place (relational database) 
for your stuff (random infor- 
mation you want to store). 
Since it's not a full-blown da- 
tabase like Access or 
FoxPro, it requires no pro- 
gramming knowledge. This 
makes it easier to use but 
more limited than a more 
structured database. 

Adding an entry to a data- 
base is as simple as typing 
a sentence. The program 
converts the sentence into 
grammatical elements and 
places the words in their ap- 
propriate fields, cutting the 
extraneous verbiage. For ex- 
ample, you could activate 
the sentence template and 
type 101 Dalmatians is a 
great video for kids, create 
a new category called Vide- 
os, and start tracking your 
videotape collection. Or you 
could use the name-and-ad- 
dress template to enter ad- 
dress data. 

You can view your re- 
cords one at a time in detail 
or in a list format. You can 
set filters to search for items 
that share common charac- 
teristics. Unrelated items 
can be linked by clicking on 
them in a list and saving 
them as a group. 

Reports are easier to for- 
mat than in a traditional da- 
tabase, but they aren't com- 




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For the cost of shipping and handling, only $4.00, you'll receive 
Episode One, Escape from Wolfensteiu. Or download Episode One 
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REVIEWS 



pletely automatic. You'll still have to 
define headers and footers, margins, 
column width, and spacing. 

A Place for f^y Stuff uses a standard 
Windows interface, with pull-down men- 
us, dialog boxes, and pick lists for com- 
monly used responses. Data can be im- 
ported from and exported to other cop- 




everything from connector cables to 
motherboards, a time line that starts 
with the abacus and ends with the lat- 
est microprocessors, and loads of infor- 
mation on related topics. You can 
browse through screens of text and 
illustrations, use an index to locate spe- 
cific topics, or follow lesson plans. 
Many text entries include hypertext — 
highlighted words or phrases on 
which you can click to see a definition 



A Place for My Stuff lets you create 
database entries using normal sentences. 

ies of the program, or in ASCII format. 
By sacrificing power and customi- 
zability for simplicity, A Place for (vly 
Stuff cripples itself. Its sole notable 
advantage over low-cost PIMs lies in 
its ability to interpret complete sentenc- 
es. But even users who appreciate not 
having to learn a database language 
might be frustrated its limitations. 

Still, it's capable at what it does. It's 
easy to use, once you understand its 
structure. And if you're more enamored 
with writing a sentence and viewing da- 
ta in that format than more rigid data- 
base screen shapes, it may be a 
good choice for you, especially with its 
low street price of about $79. 

Quadrangle has compiled several 
add-on databases that contain informa- 
tion on topics like PC software and hard- 
ware, vacation and travel, and sports. 
These range fronn S9.95 to $17.95, 
and, if they sound useful to you, might 
make A Place for fyly Stuff the right 
place for your database information, 

KATHV YAKAL 



Quadrangle 

(313) 769-1675 

$129 

Circle Reader Service Number 443 



COMPUTERWORKS 

If you're mystified by your computer's 
inner workings, curious about the many 
boards and peripherals you can add to 
it, or interested in the development of 
computers. Software Marketing's Com- 
puterWorks can be your graphic 
guide. 
ComputerWorks packs diagrams of 




ComputerWorks is an online reference that 
tells you all about your computer 

or a cross-referenced illustration. 

With so much information, getting 
through ComputerWorks in one sitting 
would be a daunting task. It's best suit- 
ed for browsing in your spare time, and 
its tools include bookmarl<s to keep 
your place or mark a screen to which 
you want to return. A button bar at the 
bottom of the screen makes navigation 
a breeze. After you've spent some 
time with the program, you can test 
what you've learned by taking one of 
its eight topical quizzes, (Watch out for 
the history quiz!) 

You can print any of the text or graph- 
ics from within the program or export 
them for use in your word processor or 
desktop publishing software, The graph- 
ics are colorful and detailed and 
would be useful as computer hardware 
clip art. 

Unfortunately, ComputerWorks' 
many graphics make it a fairly large pro- 
gram to keep on your hard drive, tak- 
ing up about SfvlB. Installation is easy 
and relatively quick, so you can take 
the program off your hard drive after 
you've gone through it a few times and 
reinstall it if you need it later 

ComputerWorks is filled with useful 
information, but it won't take the place 
of a manual or reference book. One 
mail-order outlet was selling it for $55. 
That seems a bit pricey compared to a 
good book, particularly if you're the on- 
ly one who will use it. But Computer- 
Works is a good introduction to comput- 
ers, and for a teacher or family, it might 
prove more flexible and accessible 
than most introductory books. Although 
it contains an abundance of informa- 
tion, ComputerWorks is general 



INTRODUCING 

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-' _' a must for pinball 
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need for a 
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you can play 
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Watch for more of the classic games you grew up with... 
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For product information, send your name and oddress to: AMTEX 
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All Irndemorks Qie Ihe property of Iheii lespecfivB companies. CopyrigH! '^- 19« AMTEX Sodware Coipmotion. J 1981 ECGHI BALI DELUXE" Is a IrodBmott or Mldwov Momitocluring Company 
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Circle Reader Service Number 157 



REVIEWS 



enough in scope that it 
won't be dated by the time 
you get it installed. 

PHILLIP MORGAN 

Software Marketing 

(602) 893-2400 

$79.95 

Cfrcle Reader Service Number 449 



VISIO 



p" 



Few tasks are more daunt- 
ing to nonartists than having 
to create good-looking busi- 
ness or technical graphics. 
For all their claimed ease of 
use, most drawing pro- 
grams — with their multiple 
tools, drawing modes, and 
nested sets of features — ar- 
en't easy at all. Worse, with 
most applications it takes 
way too much time to create 
anything more complex 
than a pie chart, and if 
you're not artistically in- 
clined, the results are likely 
to look amateurish. 

Visio is one drawing pro- 
gram that does just what it 
says: It makes creating busi- 
ness graphics a snap. The 
key to Visio's simplicity is its 
drag-and-drop approach to 
drawing. If you've ever 
used technical-drawing sten- 
cils — those green plastic 
sheets with cutouts of flow 
chart symbols, architectural 
shapes, and the like — then 
you already know how to 
use Visio, Visio has its own 
versions of those plastic sten- 
cils, with intelligent symbols 
(called SmartShapes In Visio- 
speak) for engineering sche- 
matics, flow charts, organiza- 
tion charts, network layouts, 
and 11 other common types 
of drawings. Additional sten- 
cils are available from Sha- 
peware, or you can create 
your own. 

The stencil floats in a win- 
dow next to the main draw- 
ing area, and all you have to 
do is drag the desired Smart- 
Shape from the stencil to its 

150 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



fae £JI HtncE YflnWw ijtrfp 



Sr ^ W; 

imt Oftmm ricA 

«4 mm 

«w ^\ w! 

>U P>rt M 

a «i s 

.fe .§] i 

Sj ^ m 

a i e 







\= 



::az 



ZSi 



You don't have to be an artist to create impressive charts and 
piaures with Visio, thanks to its shape library. 



place on the drawing. You 
can drag the shapes 
around, group them, add 
text, and attach connecting 
lines that extend and con- 
tract as adjustments are 
made to the drawing. Each 
SmartShape is backed by a 
minispreadsheet that de- 
fines the shape's geometry, 
text style, and other charac- 
teristics. Spreadsheet users 
can program shapes to per- 
form and display calcula- 
tions. Though Visio lacks 
most of the mode-based 
drawing tools contained in 
other drawing programs, it 
does have a smart pencil 
tool that knows when you 
are trying to draw a straight 
line or a curve and creates 
a geometrically perfect line. 
No professional artist will 
want to use Visio as his or 
her only drawing tool. It 
lacks many high-end fea- 
tures, such as 24-bit color 
and PostScript support, gra- 
dient blends, and object 
blending. But if you have to 
crank out lots of technical 
drawings of low-to-moderate 
complexity and don't want to 
spend a lot of time or money 
doing it, then Visio is for you. 

STEVEf-J ANZOVIN 



Shapeware 

(206) 467-6723 

$299 

Circle Reader Service Number 4S0 

SHERLOCK 

MS-DOS has seen many im- 
provements over the years, 
but unfortunately, it's still sad- 
dled with the painful file- 
name limitation of eight-plus- 
three characters. When you 
create a file, you must make 
up some clever abbreviation 
to remind yourself of the 
file's contents. But a few 
months later, you probably 
can't remember whether 
you stored your expense re- 
port as M07EXREXC or EX- 
PRPT7.EXC and you're 
forced to go on a tedious 
search. 

Sherlock is designed to 
solve this problem. It organ- 
izes your hard disk files just 
as you would your paper- 
based files in an office. 
Files go into folders, folders 
go into drawers, drawers go 
into cabinets, and cabinets 
go into offices. 

The program runs under 
Windows and comes up as 
a TSR when you use the 
Save As command from a 



Windows application. I 
used Sherlock often with Lo- 
tus Ami Pro. for example. 
The Sherlock Save card 
asks you for a document de- 
scription, which can be 
many words; document 
type (memo, car expenses 
or anything else you like) 
contact; user name; format 
and keywords. Most of 
these are optional, and 
when you finish the task, the 
program asks where you 
wish to store the document. 

The first time through, 
you name an office, a file 
cabinet, a drawer, and a fold- 
er. Each of these names 
can consist of several 
words. Sherlock remembers 
these, and when you save 
your next document, it offers 
you your earlier system, 
which you can change or 
supplement at any time. 

The fun comes when you 
wish to retrieve a document. 
Perhaps you've forgotten 
which folder or drawer or 
cabinet you used. Sherlock 
will find documents for you 
on the basis of words in the 
description, document type, 
or keyword list and present 
you with a list of those doc- 
uments which meet your 
specifications. Choose one, 
and Sherlock will tell you 
where it is filed and open it 
if you wish. (The newest re- 
lease also supports stan- 
dard MS-DOS filenames.) 

Sherlock is a very good 
program, It's fast, friendly, 
and easy to learn. The man- 
ual is well written, and the tu- 
torial IS very helpful. Sher- 
lock offers a solution to your 
tiling problems that's better 
than a file clerk — and much 
better than trying to remem- 
ber MS-DOS filenames, 

CHARLES l[X)L 



2010 Software 
(800) 952-2314 

S139 

Circle Reader Service Number 451 



IV rift in the fabric of time and space, a deadly ft 
the past and the judgment of all humanity await the 
t_ crew of the Starship Enterprise™ 

... the five year missioii continues. 




DcniEnT R 




Join Captain James T. Kirk and tlie crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise"' 
in all new episodes that place }/oii in command. Beam down to 
alien worlds, communicate with new life forms and take the helm 
as yon join the legendary crew of the Starship Enterprise"' in their 
continuing five year mission to explore the final frontier. 



Software © i993 Interplay Paxturtions, Inc. All n^hss rewned. Star Trek",® and © 1993 Paramounl Pictures. All rights tesen-ed. 
Star Trek is a rerisScrvd tr,idi™ark of Faramoiml Pictiia's. 




17922 Fitch A\'e. 
InHne.CA 92714 

(714) 553-6678 



REVIEWS 



WYSTERYATTHE 
MUSEUMS 

Washington's massive Smitin- 
sonian Museums form a fan- 
tastic backdrop for learning 
in fvlystery at tfie fvluseums, 
Binary Zoo's educational 
wfiodunit. In addition to build- 
ing logic skills and engag- 
ing m creative thiinking, play- 
ers are exposed to a wealtfi 
of information culled from 
the Smithsonian's 12 world- 
famous museums. 

Your guide on this whirl- 
wind tour is Edison, a 
squeaky-voiced little chap 
whose hair, complexion, 
and clothing color can be 
modified by the player. After 
inspecting your choice, 
Edison responds, "Cool!" 
He then leads you to the of- 
fice of Smitty, a private detec- 
tive in charge of a most pe- 
culiar case: It seems that 
somebody has been playing 
hide-and-seek with the muse- 
um exhibits, misplacing doz- 
ens of treasures and arti- 
facts. Your job is to visit 
each museum and, by solv- 
ing a puzzle, locate a miss- 
ing exhibit piece. A presiden- 
tial visit, scheduled for 10:00 
the next morning, adds ur- 
gency to your quest. 

The program targets ag- 
es 7 to 14 and does a tre- 
mendous job of satisfying 
this broad range with eight 
progressively challenging 
skill levels. Advanced play- 
ers can also create and 
save their own custom lev- 
els with the icon-driven 
game editor. The 16 puzzle 
types are both entertaining 
and surprisingly sophisticat- 
ed. The puzzles cover mem- 
ory, logic, mathematics, spa- 
tial relationships, pattern 
matching, and general knowl- 
edge. Along the way, al- 
most as a bonus, players 
are treated to tidbits of Smith- 
sonian knowledge, carefully 

152 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



disguised as puzzle pieces, 
ctues. and solutions. All the 
puzzles offer multiple levels 
of difficulty, assuring long- 
term interest for all age 
groups. Also worth noting 
are the context-sensitive 
help screens, responsive 
mouse controls, and excel- 
lent audiovisual feedback. 
Another hallmark of Bina- 



V FOR VICTORY: 
MARKET GARDEN 

Market Garden, the third 
game in Three-Sixty Pacif- 
ic's V for Victory line, is 
more likely to open up the 
line to a wide audience 
than either the hedgerow 
slugfest of Utah Beach or 



g^jf ftip OfiT+ftn* ilntt RutlPt Plnnnlftq PnB«# 



m-t'ii UJ '^^ J 




V for Victory: Market (Jaraen is one ol Vie best computerised 
imptementalions of classic board wargames yet. 



ry Zoo products is the mag- 
nificently rendered graph- 
ics, available in regular 256- 
color VGA or crisp high-res- 
olution Super VGA. The 
game's 30-plus screens un- 
fold like an exceptional artis- 
tic vision. 

Mystery at the Museums 
takes its distinct style from Ar- 
tech Digital Entertainments' 
Rick Banks and Paul Butler, 
best known for their long, pro- 
lific association with Acco- 
lade. The designers have def- 
initely found their creative 
niche at Binary Zoo, and 
this program is one of the 
best works of their careers. 

SCOTT A MAY 



Binary Zoo 
(518) 298-2470 
S34.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 452 



the relatively obscure caul- 
dron that was Velikiye Luki. 

fvlarket Garden was an am- 
bitious plan to plant the Al- 
lied flag on German soil be- 
fore the winter of 1944-45 
and so speed the end of 
World War II. The problem: 
Paratroopers assigned to 
seize a series of six critical 
bridges across Holland in 
September 1944 weren't 
aware of the presence near- 
by of substantial German 
forces — including two SS 
panzer divisions — until they 
were forcefully made aware 
of them. The results were 
heavy losses, retreat, disas- 
ter. This battle was the sub- 
ject of the popular film A 
Bridge Too f^ar. 

fvlarket Garden shares 
the same basic look and 
feel of its predecessors in 



the series. Among V for Vic- 
tory's strengths are ease of 
use, with an intelligent click- 
and-drag system for moving 
units: an efficient toolkit of 
micromanagement controls; 
shimmering Super VGA dis- 
plays (war games simply 
don't look any better than 
this); an array of what-if var- 
iants and scenarios that 
give the game a long life; 
and the ability to delegate au- 
thority to your staff. 

Better Al means you'll 
face a more rigorous chal- 
lenge than in earlier VfV 
games. This is on top of the 
substantial difficulty of the 
f^arket Garden campaign. 

Rather than offering set- 
piece battles in the fashion 
of the earlier two games, IVlar- 
ket Garden forces more mul- 
tidimensional thinking, as 
players have to deal simulta- 
neously with several mini- 
fronts — sometimes widely 
separated along the narrow 
corridor — operating under a 
variety of different circum- 
stances and pressures. 

Market Garden is every 
bit as solid as its predeces- 
sors, and when Three-Sixty 
upgrades the game, it will be- 
come the first in the series 
to accommodate modem 
play. My only misgiving is 
that Market Garden and its 
brethren are essentially 
board games played on a 
computer, complete with hex- 
es, phases, and turns. This 
seems to slight the medi- 
ums potential for realistic, 
free-flowing, simultaneous 
combat. Still, as far as com- 
puterized board games go, 
you'd be hard-pressed to 
find one smarter and better- 
looking than Market Garden. 

PETEH OLAFSON 



Three-Sixty Pacific 
(800) 245-4525 
(408) 879-9144 
$69.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 453 



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eiEWS 



TONY LA RUSSA 
BASEBALL II 

Tony La Russa Baseball II in- 
cludes just about every ele- 
ment of America's favorite 
pastime except for the sev- 
enth-inning stretch. You can 
play it as a statistical simula- 
tion, a full-fledged action 
game, or anythiing in be- 
tween. One of the most com- 
plete baseball simulations 
available, Tony La Russa 
Baseball II is packed withi 
over 15MB of graphics, 
sound, and statistical data. 

Like most state-of-the-art 
sports games. La Russa II 
lets you choose between a 
strategic or action game, 
with either the computer or 
you controlling the action. 
However, La Russa II also 
lets you assign certain 
tasks to the computer while 
keeping others for your con- 
trol. For example, you can 
give the computer fielding, 
throwing, and running du- 
ties, so you need handle on- 
ly the pitching and batting. 

If you prefer a hands-on 
approachi to managing a 
baseball team, you can cre- 
ate your own teams, fvlanage- 
ment capabilities include ed- 
iting player statistics, transfer- 
ring players between the ac- 
tive roster and the reserve 
list, setting the pitching rota- 
tion and batting order, mak- 
ing defensive assignments, 
and more. An important en- 
hancement in La Russa II is 
the manager profile editor, 
which lets you assign a de- 
tailed managing style to the 
computer manager. The man- 
ager's style is divided into 
five strategy categories — 
Lineup & Rotation, Pitching, 
Batting, Defense, and Base 
Running — each of which con- 
tains several strategies 
which you can edit. 

Whether you want to play 
a single game against a 

154 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




SSI's Toi'y La Russi: Basebaii II li^ls you assign certain tasks, such 
as fielding, throwing, and runnir^g duties, to the computer. 



friend or compete against 
the computer for the pen- 
nant throughout an entire 
season. La Russa II deliv- 
ers. You can even put togeth- 
er your ideal fantasy teams 
and leave the computer to 
figure out who'll win the 
World Series as your game 
statistics flash by and the out- 
come of each game is calcu- 
lated. In less than 20 min- 
utes, every pitch, hit. strike- 
out, and run in the season 
blazes through your comput- 
er's memory. 

Adding to the simulation's 
realism are La Russa IPs nice- 
ly rendered graphics and 
good use of digitized 
sounds. Throughout each 
game, you'll watch convinc- 
ingly animated players race 
about the field, as well as 
hear the announcers com- 
ment intelligently on the 
plays. Tony La Russa Base- 
baii II is the next-best thing 
to having a ballpark in your 
living room. 

CLAYTON WALfvJUM 



Strategic Simulations 
(800) £45-4525 
(408) 737-6600 
$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 454 



KELLYREST 

If you spend several hours 
each day at your computer, 
the thought of developing car- 
pal tunnel syndrome, a wide- 
ly known repetitive stress in- 
jury, can be frightening. An 
ergonomically designed work- 
space can greatly decrease 
your chances of getting this 
painful condition. 

KellyRest, a cushioned 
wrist rest that slides right un- 
der your keyboard, has 
made typing much more 
comfortable for me. It ex- 
tends about three inches 
out from the front of your key- 
board to keep your hands 
and wnsts at a comforiable 
position while working. The 
wrist pad is attached to a 
nonslip metal backing 
which sits under your key- 
board and keeps the wrist 
pad from moving, 

KellyRest acts as a buffer 
between my wrists and the 
edge of my desk, and it forc- 
es me to keep my hands 
and arms in a better posi- 
tion for preventing repetitive 
strain injuries. Although 
your wrists are supposed to 
stay elevated wtien you 
type, when you do lower 



them, it's much nicer to hit a 
Naugahyde pad than the 
hard wood edge of a desk. 

KellyRest is effortless to in- 
stall; just slide it out of the 
box and under the front 
edge of your keyboard. 
There's nothing to attach. Its 
quality construction is indicat- 
ed by its four-pound weight. 
The standard model is 1 
inch high, 3 inches deep, 
and 19 inches wide, and 
should accommodate a stan- 
dard AT-style keyboard. Kel- 
ly can create custom config- 
urations as well. 

As a measure of preven- 
tion of the potentially painful 
reality of carpal tunnel syn- 
drome, this wrist rest is of 
great comfort both mentally 
and physically If you're look- 
ing for the peace of mind 
that comes with a healthy 
working environment, Kel- 
lyRest is a good start, 

POLLY CILLPAM 

Kelly Computer Supplies 

(800) 447-2929 

$39 

Circle Reader Service Number 4SS 

LOST SECRET OF 
THE RAINFOREST 

Vibrant graphics and 
sounds make Lost Secret of 
the Rainforest a highly enter- 
taining product. And with 
the freeciom to explore new 
worlds and develop creative 
solutions to problems, chil- 
dren should find this latest 
addition to the Sierra Discov- 
ery Series highly education- 
al as well. Ecology car} be 
fun 

As Adam Greene's adven- 
ture begins in Peru, both on- 
screen and manual direc- 
tions help familiarize chil- 
dren with the program and 
advance them through the 
first stage. Adam learns that 
he's been chosen to save 
the South American rain- 
forest and begins searching 



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_ 33 

I Do you own a g CD-Rom Drrve □ Sound Card n Fax^ofJem Board 

3* S5 36 

J What IS your total household income? o*$30.0M n 530.000+ r:S50.000+ cJ75 000* 
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K What IS yffljr age' [:lB-24 :; £5-34 [i 35-49 i;50* 

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III, ||.,l,lll,.„.ll.l.l...ll...l.l..l..lili»l 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Adverliser 



Page 



162 8-Blt G-11 

194 Abacus 71 

169 Access SoNware 120,121 

204 Advanced Gravis 35 

Adventure LearningWare 168 

AlCS 154 

Amefica Online 138 

28B Amisti Outlaw Shareware Co 172 

157 AMTEX Sollware Corporation 149 

137 Automap tnc 76 

Bare Bones Sottware 174 

152 Bear Technologies G-17 

Best Personalized Books 169 

173 Blue Valley Software 170 

121 BR. ROWS 172 

1B1 Calolse Industries G-21 

118 Cell Micro 167 

167 CH P(0(JuClS 153 

175 Chips & Bits 161 

174 Citizen Artwrican Corp |FC,1 

139 CMD/Crative Micro Designs, tnc G-lO 

251 Colorado Spectrum 17 

209 Compaq 3,4,5,6,7, 

150 CompSult 174 

114 CompSult G41 

227 Comptons New Media 81 

108 ComprjServe 32,33 

Computer Business Services 168 

254 Computet Friends, Inc 174 

Comtrad 162,163 

125 Creative Labs 9 

226 Crostey Soltware 170 

144 CyberDreams 117 

151 Davidson 41 

106 Davidson 39 

Dechlar 148 

161 Delpfii 23 

131 OemoSource 173 

253 Disks O'Plenty G-17 

208 Disk-Count Sottware 157 

136 Dr rs Music Sottware 130 

192 Df rs Music Soltware 131 

D&K Enterprises 169 

112 Electronic Arte 101 

196 Eledronic Arts 52.53 

165 Electronic Arts 124.125 

134 Fanlazia Concepts, Inc 174 

FGM Corncction G-11 

115 Free Spirit Software 15B,159 

228 Gencvation Inc 169 

GM Gold Master Card IBC 

110 Grapevine Group, The G-5 



140 Hi Tech Expressions 86,67 

119 t^ollyware Entertainment 135 

117 Hollyware Entertainment 133 

234 Horse Feattiers Graptrics G-17 

259 Hunr-ongous Entertainment 123 

129 HyperLight Enterprises 170 

IBM 11 

IBM 55 

300 ID SOFTWAHE 147 

206 Impressions 29 

155 Inline Software .132 

185 Interplay 151 

231 Jackson Marking Products Co. Inc 168 

160 JemmaSoft 166 

JP PBM Products by Mail G-21 

124 Kaltek G-17 

197 KF-PD Software G-11 

Kid Secure of America 168 

178 UCE 170 

Landmark Saiulions, Inc 167 

164 Legacy Software 174 

123 Logitech 31 

255 Logitech 136,137 

260 Mad Man Software G-9 

199 Mallard Software 51 

158 Maxis 131 

211 MicroLeague Sports 141 

133 MicroPiosE 127 

Microsoft 62,63 

289 MicroStonn Software G-17 

191 Necdham's Electronics, Inc 171 

NRI/McGraw Hill 17i 

NRi/McGraw Hill 57 

141 Odyssey OnLine 170 

248 Origin 113 

156 Pacific Microelectronics Inc 166 

168 Parsons Technology 25 

107 Penthouse Modem 175 

103 Penthouse Online 144 

Penthouse Pholographer 140 

250 PC Enterprises 174 

153 Performance Peripherals, Inc G-21 

207 Pixel Perled 139 

PowerDlsk G-17 

256 Protrt Group, The 173 

Q Enterprises Software G-17 

241 Quadra interactive 83 

180 Radio Shack 18.19 

138 Ramco Computer Supply 170 

163 ReadySoft 145 

135 Revell Monogram Inc 85 

212 SaleSoll Systems Inc 172 



182 ScanRom Publications 166 

183 School ol Computer Training 168 

111 School ol PC Repair 168 

Sega 65i 

12B Seril, Inc 15 

116 SeXXy 172 

171 Shareware Central 165,172 

Sierra Online Dynamix . . 89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98 

148 Sierra OnLine , . . . BC 

Sierra OnLine 731 

Sign Up 166 

109 Smart Luck Solhvare 174 

142 SMC/ Software ol the Month Club 170 

126 SottShoppe 174 

121 SottVision International 160 

210 Soltware Supoorl Inlemational 172 

190 Sollware Support Inlemational G-7 

SOGWAP Software G-9 

145 SOMICH Enterprises 170 

201 Spectrum Hoiobytc 44,45 

154 Spirit ol DiscQvefy 47 

203 Star Mtcronics 27 

130 Starvflre Publisfiing Corp 171 

179 Sublogic 110,111 

176 Tck-Shop 167 

147 Thruslmastcr 171 

202 Tune 1(XM 87 

193 Turtle Beach Systems 107 

247 Turtle Beach Systems 107 

242 Tycom Inc G-21 

301 U.S. Robotics 61 

127 Value Sottware tnc 174 

195 Virgin Games 74,75 

132 Virgin Games 142,143 

105 Virgin Games 129 

1B9 Walnut Creek CDROM 165 

172 Wedgwood Rental 172 

128 Windows 900 173 

Product Marl 165.166.167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174 

Classifieds 175,176,177 

104 COMPUTE Books 139,140.6-19 



COMPUTES SharPak Disk Subscription 105 

COMPUTE Ultimate Power Disk 59 

Gazette Disk Index G-21 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-9 

Gazette Productivity Manager G-23 

Gazette Specialty Disit G-15 







CREDITS 

Cover: Mark Wagoner; page 10: Rob 
Schuster; page 13: Ted Pitts/Scott Hull 
Associates; pages 68-69: Kee Hwa 
Jeun/lmage Bank; pages 77-78, 80, 82, 
84, 86, 88, 99-100: Rob Schuster; page 
102: Mark Wagoner; page 108: Mark 
Wagoner; pages 114-15: Mark Wagoner; 
page 199: Richard Hawks; page G-2: © 
1993 Keith LoBue/SIS. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE offers two (different disk products for 
PC readers: the SharePak disk and PC Disk, 
SharePak is monthly and has a subscription 
price of $59,95 for 5V4-inch disks and $64,95 for 
3V2-inch disks. A subscription to SharePak 
does not include a subscription to the maga- 
zine. PC Disk appears in odd-numbered 
months and has a subscription price of $49.95, 
which includes a subscription to COMPUTE. You 
can subscribe to either disk or to both, but a 
subscription to one does not include a subscrip- 
tion to the other 



NOVEMBER 1993 COI^PUTE 



155 



REVIEWS 



for fads that could help 
stop its destruction. Your 
child must talk to people 
and animals, read their re- 
sponses, and collect items 
that will help solve the for- 
est's mysteries. The Ecor- 
der, a hand-held computer, 
stores information about 
each animal and plant spe- 
cies, about ecological disas- 
ters that threaten the forest's 
existence, and about the his- 
tory and way of life of South 
America's indigenous peo- 
ple. The Ecorder also allows 
your child to review the 
facts, take quizzes, and 
print the recorded informa- 
tion for reference. 

Using the information col- 
lected with the Ecorder, 
your child finds ways to ad- 
vance through each level. Be- 
cause the game doesn't pro- 
vide instructions for solving 
problems, your chiid must ex- 
plore the area and use logic 
and imagination to solve the 
puzzles, which include sav- 
ing an egg from a nest fire 
and getting past a swarm of 
insects. By encouraging cre- 
ative thinking, Lost Secret of 
the Rainforest sets itself 
apart from other educational 
games. However, the lack of 
instructions can be challeng- 
ing sometimes, since your 
child is stuck in a single set- 
ting until each problem is 
solved and the next path is 
revealed. 

Lost Secret of the Rain- 
forest uses 256-color VGA 
to create the detailed back- 
drops, which include tree 
canopies, caves with twist- 
ing tunnels, and a village of 
native people. Sierra also us- 
es 16-bit audio to create 
background music, realistic 
voices, and the natural 
sounds of the rainforest. The 
package comes with both 
MS-DOS and enhanced Win- 
dows versions and can be 
operated using mouse, joy- 
stick, or keyboard. 

156 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 




'^^. 






i&JMm 








You can control up to 16 tanks simultaneously in heavy battle with 
War in the Gulf's flexible quad-view interface. 



Although the game tar- 
gets children age 10 and old- 
er, young users may find 
some of the problems frustrat- 
ing; however, the thrill of solv- 
ing a difficult problem is re- 
warding and may encour- 
age them to continue. 

Sierra guarantees that 
your child will gain new infor- 
mation while playing Lost Se- 
cret of the Rainforest and 
provides a full refund if you 
aren't convinced of the pro- 
gram's learning value. 

LiSA YOUNG 



Sierra On-Line 
(BOO) 326-6654 
$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 456 



WAR IN THE GULF 

Kuwait, 1995. Saddam Hus- 
sein remains at the helm of 
Iraq's ship of state. Inci- 
dents between Israel and 
the Palestinians have raised 
the level of tension in the Mid- 
dle East. Saddam believes 
the tinne is right to retake 
Kuwait. 

This is the fhghteningly be- 
lievable scenario of one of 
the best battlefield simula- 
tors ever. War in the Gulf. 
Your assignment is to lead 
Team Kuwait, a crack team 
composed of American De- 



sert Storm veterans hired by 
Kuwait's emir. You're com- 
manding a tank assault to re- 
pel the invading Iraqi Repub- 
lican Guard. Two Kuwait oil 
fields must be retaken, and 
the Iraqis must be pushed 
back across the border. 

The emir has provided 
over $55 million to outfit 
Team Kuwait. Available 
weapons inciude the M-1 
Abrams battle tank, the M- 
113 armored personnel car- 
rier, the M-2 Bradley infantry 
fighting vehicle, and the M- 
901 TOW missile launcher. 
Each vehicle may be 
equipped with your choice 
of four different weapons: 



HEAT, SABOT, TOW, and 
SMOKE missiles. 

You command 16 vehi- 
cles, which are divided be- 
tween four platoons. A four- 
way split screen lets you 
see the battlefield from the 
perspective of each team. If 
the action gets too hot for 
one team, you can expand 
its view to full-screen so you 
can see more of what's go- 
ing on. Thermal imaging 
makes night fighting possi- 
ble, and you can call up an 
overhead map showing 
your forces and the Iraqi for- 
mations. 

Controlling 16 tanks at 
once isn't easy, but who 
said war is simple? If you 
want to hone your battlefield 
strategy skills. War in the 
Gulf is worth a look. It is sim- 
ilar Empire tank games, 
such as Team Yankee, but it 
exhibits all the positive char- 
acteristics of a program 
that's been fine-tuned and 
perfected over time. My 
tanks to ReadySoft for import- 
ing this fun game. 

BOB ELLER 



Empire 

Distributed by ReadySoft 

(416)731-4175 

$49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 4S7 



SPEAK UP! 

Is there a hardware or software product 

you'd like to see reviewed in COMPUTE? 

Let us know by calling 

(900) 884-8681 , extension. 7010103. 

The call will cost 95 cents per minute, 

you must be 18 or older, 

and you must use a touch-tone phone. 

Sponsored by Pure Entertainment, 

P.O. Box 186, Hollywood, California 90078. 




DISK-COUNT 
SOFTWARE 



Lowest delivered prices with great customer service 

800-448-6658 



Aesops Fables 33 
Airaaft Enc¥Ciopda45 
Araef Bus, Phnbk. 39 
Amef Herl Piol Did 75 
Arthur Teacher Trbl 41 
Autodesk Explofer119 
Barney Bear Goes 



to School 

into Space 26 

Battlechess 34 

Beauty i Beast 49 
Beethoven Ninth 59 
Bertitz TTiink & Talk 

French 105 

Spanish 105 

Bloodnel 41" 

Blue Force 39" 

Bookshelf 129 

Brilanica Family Chc49 
Buiz Aldrin Race 59 
Carmen Worfd DIxb65 
Cautious Condor 45 
CD Game Pack 
C D Speedway 
Chess Maniac 
Chrislmas Carol 
CIA World Fact 
Clipart Goliath 
Conan Cimerion 
Creative Kids 
Curse of Encfiantia25'' 
Deathslar Arcade 30 
Oiclionaries & Lang 30 
Dune 45" 

Education Master 32 
Electronic Cookbk 75 
Elect Home Library 49 
Eldm TfavelerCalf 33 
Encarta Encydpd249'° 
European Monarch549 



55 
57 

34" 
33 
39 
30 
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36'' 



39" 
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F-1S 
F-117A 
Family Doctof 
Fatty Bear 
Font Master 
G Force 
Gateway II 

Gettysburn:MM Hisl43 
Gofer Winkles Adv 33 
Golden Immortal 28 
Great Cites Voll 
G unship 2000 
Guy Spy 
Humans 
nca 

Inspector Ga-Aet 37* 
Interactive Old Test52 
Interactive Storytims45 
Intro Games Fr/Sp 79 
Its 3 Wonderful Life 48 
Jazz:Multimedia Hist69 
Jets S Props 55 

Jones in Fast Lane 37 
Just Grandma i Me36 
Jutland 44" 

Kings Quest 5 42 
KingOueslBUp 26" 
Land Of Lore 34" 
Languages of World 9 9 
Learn loSpeai(Spn59 
Leisure Suit Larry 42 



Sound Cards 



ATI ytsreo rM ■ iJi* 

StereoF/x CD «7« 

Covox Voice Bl* 64" 

Gravs Ultra Sound 126 

CD-ROM Kit 298" 

»^ 

CDPC 

COPCXl 

Pro Audio 16 

Pro Audio StucSo 224" 

Pro 16 Multimedia 

Upgrade Kit 2 935 
Pro Movie Audio 339» 
Logitech Audioporl t34 

Soundman 132" 
Sound Blaster 85 
SB MkS Kt . 59" 

Snd Blast Pro MCA 259 
Sound Blaster Deix 132 
SB Pro 16 ■- 164« 
SBProie AS?^ 209» 
SB D'scCTjery 16 I 459 
SB Edulanmnt 16 549" 



139 

959 

1159 



Lbry of Ar1:R9naisn65 
Loom 39 

Lost Treasure 49 
MacMillian Child Dict49 
Manhole 49 

Maniac Mansion 39" 
Mantis 45" 

Mario is Missing 47" 
Mavis Beacon 39 
Mayo Clinic 49 

Mixed Up Moth Gs 37 
Monarch fJoles 75 
Monkey Island 39 
MM Music: Mozart 33 
MM Music: Vivaldi 33 
Our Solaf System 29 
Pool Shark 19" 

Pra'sion Map 84" 
Pfotostar 39" 

PublishSip 69 

Reference Library 59 
Return of Phantom37" 
Rolor/Airball/Time 25 
San Diego Zoo 49 
Secret Weapons 59 
Seventh Guest 59 
Sheriock Holmes 39 
Sherlock Holmes 2 42 
Sherlock Holmes 3 49 
Sleeping Beauty 37 
Sound Wori(s 35 
Space Quest 4 37 
Space Series-Apollo49 
Space Shullle 29" 
Spirit of Excalibur 37 
Sfella; 7 37 

Strange Deadfellow39 
Star Trek Enhanced49 
Street Atlas 99 

Talking Classic Tale75 
Tallfng Jungle Saiari75 
Time Table Scienc859 
Ultimate Shareware 59 
U S Atlas 42 

US Atlas w/AutQmap49 
US History 39 

US Presidents 49 
USA Wars:Ctvil Waf49 
USA Wars:Korea 49 
USA Wars:Vietnam 49 
USA Wars: WW tl 49 
Voyage Planet ea 69 
Who Killd Sam Rup 25 
Willy Beamish 37 
Win CD 32 

Wing Comm & Miss 45 
Wing ConVUItima 6 45 
Wing Comm 2 57 
W C2/Ulti. Undrwld 57 
Wortd Atlas 42 

Wortd War II Pak 37" 

Adults QnlY-Musl lie£] 

Animation Fantasy 65 
PCPixVol1or2 65 
Porkware 65 

Private Colleclion 65 
Priv. Pkrtures 1 Of 265 
Seedy Vol 1-7 ea. 65 
Stomi 1 Of 2 65 

Visual Fantasy 65 
Caddies 7.956a. 3/$ 19 



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SB Porlblaster 149 

SB WeoB)asleri349 

SB Video Spigot 419" 

SB Waveblasler 234" 

Roland RAP-10 459»= 

SCC-1 GS 375 

SC-7 315 

SC-56 549" 

MA-12C ea 105 

^^Wlildad 23 
CS-550 Shielded 35 
w/3band Equ!lizef45 
CS-1000 84" 

Altec Lansing 200 21 9 
ACS 300 299 




lidialor 101 Se/laJ 9a 
PC Midi Card 79 

2PortSE 149" 
Heilo Music 277*= 
Tne Miracle 325 



HOURS: fA-F 9 AM- 8 PM SAT 1 AM- 3 PM EST sj^jyj.t; 

PRODUCTINFO & OTHER BUSINESS; 908-396-8880 WMi 



A Train 39 

Constnjdion Set £2 
Across the Rhine 47" 
Aces Over Eufope 44" 
Aces of the Paafic42" 
Mission Disk 19" 
ADiO Colled 2 42" 
AD&D Starter Kit 42e 
ADiD Unlimited 37« 
AdIbou&Junior UX 34« 
Air Bucits 34m 

Air Bus A320 45»! 
Air Duel 33«i 

Air Warrior SVGA 25» 
AJ World Discvry 29»s 
AlgeBtaster Plus 30 
Alone in The Darf< 35* 
Alphabet Blocks 29k 
Amazon 38k 

Amazon Trail 34» 
Ambush 37» 

Ancient Art War Sky3S 
Andent Empires 30 
Animal Adventure 47" 
Animation Studio 75 
Arcade lor Wind 29" 
Armored Fist 37" 
Ashes of Empire 35" 
A.TJ\.C. 35 

Auto Insight 49 

Automap 44 

Automap Wind 59 
Aulomap Europe 74 
Autoworks 39" 

B-17Ft>'ing Fortress 19 
Bailey's Bookhouse29" 
Bane Cosmic Forge 36 
Batman Retums 39" 
Batttechess4COOSVGA36 
Battle of Destiny 35" 
Beat 6ie House 29" 
Betrayal of Krondor39" 
Batty CrockorCopk Call 
Black Crypt 31" 

Bloodnel 37" 

Blue & Gray 35" 
Blueforce 39" 

Body Illustrated 47* 
Bodyworks 42 

Bug Bunny WrkShp 31 
Buzz Aldrin 39" 

Caesar 35" 

Car and Dfivef 27" 
Camer Strike 39 

Expansion Disk 19" 
earners at War 2 42" 
Cash for Kids 31" 
Castle 2 35" 

Castle of Or. Brain 30 
Center Court Ten. 12* 
Challnge 5 Realm 33" 
Champions 35" 

Chemistry Works 38 
Chessmaster 29" 
ChikltenWritSiPubl39 
City Streets 59" 

Civilization 37 

Civilization Deluxe45" 
Civilization Win 41" 
Clash of Steel 39" 
Coaster 35" 



MIDI Softivare 



tJaliadB Windows /y 
Bamt in a Box 69 
Cadenza 125 

Cake-.vatk 95 

Cai^ertalkWin nS^ 
Cslnm/k Pro 169 
Cakewa&VVinPto240 
Encore 379 

Jammer F^o 125 
Laser Music Proces79 
Masar Trails Pre 249 
MCSStweo i S5 
Midiscan Z69» 

Midisolt Studio 159 
Music SylesVdl 65 
Music Mentor 79 

Music Printer Plu3 419 
Music Tune 169 

Rario Woiits 98 

Quick Score Deii«939 
Sons'nrighl S B9* 
Ttak iof IWintovs . 60 



Comanche 42" 

Misacn Disk 25" 
Comic Bk Creator 1 7 
Compan of Xanth 35" 
Computer Works 46" 
Cohort 2 19" 

Conquest 0* Japan 35" 
Conb-apBon Zak 25" 
Cmsader Drit Savnt39* 
Cuckoo Zoo 31" 

Cyber Space 34" 
Daemonsgate 35" 
Darklands 37" 

Daikseed 39 

Darkside of Xeen 39" 
Dark Sun 47" 

Daughter of Serpnt31" 
DBJaVu1&2 37" 
Design your Railrd. 35 
Diet Pro DOS/Win25/36 
Dino Pari; 35" 

Oino Quest 31" 

Dinosaur Adventi)re34 
Discovering Amer 35" 
Distant Sun 39" 

[JogRght 37* 

Dr Floyd Desktop 19" 
Dr Jam Window 59" 
Dr. Quandty 31 

Dragon Spriere 
Dragon Lair 3 39" 
Dreadnoughts 40" 
Dune 2 36 

Dungeon Master 29" 
Dynamix Bundle 42 
Eagle Eye Mystery 31" 
Eco-Quest 1 or 2 29" 
Eight Ball Detx 35" 
EIFisfi 35 

Empire Deluxe 35" 
Entmil Pak Win (ea.)28 
Eric the Unready 35" 
Etemam 35" 

Eye d Behokler 20 
Eye Beholder 2 38 
Eye of Beholder 3 42 
EZ Cosmos 42 

Ez Language Series 
Fr.Grll.SpJp.Rs 31" 
F14 Fieel 6efend 44" 
FISIil 44 

Master Edition 49" 
F1 17a Stealth 29" 
Fak»n 3.0 45 

Oper Fight Tiger 25 
Mig 29 Data Disk 34" 
Family Tree Maker 42 
Fantasy Empire 42" 
Farm Creativity Kit 1 8 
Fatty Bear BirthdaySI" 
Relds of Glory 33" 
Flashback 32" 

Flight Siraul ATP 28* 
Right Simulator 5 43* 
« Trfo Cntrir 34* 
Arcft/Scen Dsgn 28 
AJrcraH Adv Factiy 25 
#685 17 

#701 17 

Airport Fady Loc 1 7 
Califomia 37 

East USA Seen 39" 
Greal Britian 37 



CD DRIVES 



Hawaii 19 

Instant Fadf Loc 19 

Japan Scsnaiv 19" 

New Yori< 29" 

Paris 29" 

Pitots Pwer Tools 24" 

ResajeAir911 17 

San Fransisco 29" 

ScenetySlAorB 37 

Scenery Enhn Ed 25 

Sound 4 Graphc 25 

Tahiti 19 

Washington DC 29" 

West USA Scmy 39* 

West Europe 19 

Freddy Phari<as 39" 

Front Page Pro 45* 

Fun School:Fred Froa 

Sam Spy.Teddy Br17 

G-Forc« 19" 

Gateway II 35" 

Gearworiis 29" 

Geekwad Games 22" 

Gobblins 1 or 2* 22 

Grand Slam Bridg II 32 

Great Naval Admri 48" 

Super Ships 20* 

Great Works 30* 

Gunship 2000 29* 

Scenario Disk 24 

Hardball 3 35 

Dala Disk (ea.) 17" 

Harrier Assault 34" 

Headline Hany 37 

Health & Diet (^ra 26 

High Command 42" 

Hong Kong Mah|ong32 

Hoyfe Bk Game 1/3 30 

Humans 25 

Inca 34" 

Incredible Ma£hine29" 

Indiana Jones 4 37 

Inspector Gadget 35" 

Island o( Of. &ajn 29" 

Jetfighter 2 39 

Adv Mission Disk 19 

John Madden 2 31" 

Johnny (iuest 29" 

Jump Jet 38" 

Mf^E Version 48* 

KvB Deluxe 30" 

Kid Cad 29" 

Kid Cuts 35" 

Kid Desk 2S 

KidPctures 19" 

KJdPix 35" 

KkJ Pix CompariKin 25 

KkJ Wotks 2 35" 

Kids Zoo 33" 

Kings Ransom 34" 

King's Quest 6 45 

Land Of Lore 34" 

Legacy 39 

Legacy Necrt)mncrl9" 

Legion's of Kretia 37 

Lemmings 29" 

Lemmings 2 35* 

Lethal Weapon 35* 

Links 25 

Unks 386 Pro 39 

Course Disk ea 1 6 

386 Courses ea 19" 

Lord of Rings 2 37 



Joysticks 



3041 internal 489" 

3041 External 594" 

Texcel Amerkia 

3021 Internal 349 

3C24DbfSpd 390 

3024 Business 679 

3024 EducaSon604 

3024 Home 569 

3024 Mullimeda844 

;<S024DbiSpd 495 

5024 Business 769 

5024 Education 729 

. 5024Multimed 369 . 

uffloboBc^Sportsler 



CH HighisticK : ar* 
CB Game Card 3 31 
CHMachS ZB^ 

CH Virtual PiliS 65 
Elimliator Card 26 
Gravis Ariafoj Pro 39 
Gravis Jgysfe* 32 
Graw PC Gamtf'ad21 

Kife Mouse ::::>:30":i 

Kra.ft KC3 Joystictt 2& 
Maxit Flph! Yoke 69 
Maxx Pedal ^ i i • : 39 
QuictehQtGanieCdU 
Qui*shol Wa,-Tlor 18 
Suticom ComreandlS" 



■ Lost RIa Sha'.oA' ST*' 
LostTreas Infocom 42 
Lost Treasures 2 29" 
Lost Tribe 25 

Luna/ Command 35" 
Lost Vikings 29" 

Maelstom 39" 

Magic Candle 3 37" 
Maniac Manskjn 1135" 
Mantis 39 

Speecti Disk 1 7 
l«lano is Missing 35" 
Mario Teach Type 25 
Master of Orion 37" 
Math Blaster Plus 29" 
Mystery 29" 

Search of Spot 35" 
Math Blaster VKnd 36 
Math Rabbit 29" 

Malhology 29* 

Mavis Beacon 29" 
Mega Lo Mania 29* 
Mental Matt; Games37 
MichI Jofdon Rght 37" 
Miao Cool*ool( 4. 31 
Micfosofi GoJf 39 

Midnight Rescue 35 
Might & Magic 4 40 
Might 4 Mage 5 39* 
Millies Matti House 31 
Mind Castte 35" 
Mixed-Up Fairy Tai 30 
Mixed-Up Motfier Gs30 
Money/Clocks Wrt( 19 
Monkey Island 1/2 23 
Monopoly Deluxe 34 
More Vegas Gamel9" 
Mutanoid Challenges 1 
Mystery at MaseumSS" 
NFL Chailenge 59 
NFL Coaches Club 33 
Nigel's Worid 31 

No Greater Gtoiy 20" 
OmarShariff Bndge37 
Open Dialog 44" 
Operation hleptune 35 
Orbits 29" 

Oregon Trail Deix 34* 
Origin FX 25 

Ouf of This Wortd 36 
Outnumbered 30 
Pacifx: Wara 47 

Paladin 2 35 

Patriot 24" 

PC Study BiHe 42 
Peppers Adventure29" 
Peffed Genera] 36 
Pinball Dreams 29" 
Pirtate's Gold 38" 
Rayroom 2.0 30" 
Poiice Quest 3 39" 
Pool Shartt 19" 

Prince of Persia 2 39" 
Print Shoo Deluxe 45 
Graphic CdL (ea) 30 
Print Shop, New 35 
Graphcs (ea) 22 
Print Shp Cortipion 31 
Privateer 47* 

Prophecy 25* 

Pnjfoslar 39* 

Putt Putt Parade 32 
Putt Putt Fun Pack 26 



Multimedia 



3BS 
2B0 
529 
459 



2400 InL 



portsler 
99" 



14.4v.42bs 162* 

■ w/S/RFax 183* 

14.4 v.42bis Ext 183* 

w/S/RFax 213* 



FCSPfO 
Game Cars! ^ 
Weapons 2 
Rudder Pedal 
UPR0>4 Oilp 



69 
109 
::23» 
95* 
109 
29" 



Atlech 
Audk) Show 
Pro 256 : 
Pro Color Plus 
ProVGATV 
Pro PC/TV Pius 249* 
Pro VGA;tV + 659 
VideoSurge 653 
^^deoSurg SVHS729 
Wave Watdisf 419 

TV/GRX TV : : i:;:;: 2B9 



Skins & Pads 



Dust Covers 15 

Grounded Wrist Strp 9 
Keyboard Skins 15 
Static Pads 

Large- System 1 5 
Wrist fj^ads 8 

Stax (Dust Repellent)5 
Statx Complete 
Cleaning System 15 




NO SURCHARGE 

SHIPPING IS ONty $4.00 

PER ORDER, NOT PER 

ITEM 

HARDWARE INCLUDEDlli 

Quarter Pole 29" Studyware lor ACT 
Quest for Gtoryl 22 _GMAT,GR_E,SAT 30 



Quest for Glory 3 
Rags to Riches 
Reach for Skies 
Reader Rabbit 
Reader Rabbit 2 
Ready for Letter 
Ready Set Read 



39 Studyware Bkjiogy, 

35* Cafc.,Chem.,Econ., 

19* Physics, Statistlo 25 

35" Studyware LSAT 37 

35" Syndicate 37* 

35" Take a break X-Word29 



29" Pinball' 29" 

Reading Adv in Oz 36 Task Force 1942 37" 
Reading Comp 32 Admiral Edit 43" 
Ready Set Read 29" Temiinalof 2029 39* 
Realms of Arcadia35" Tesserae 17" 

Red Baron 39 Tmintr 2 Cybichess 35 

Mission Disk 17 Tetris Classic 31 

Return a Phantm 33" Time Rklere Amer. 35 
Rex Nebular 37 Tony LaRussa Base. 17 

Ring Wortd 34* Tony LaRussa II 37" 

Robosports Wind 25" Expansion Disk 19" 
Rod! & Badi Studo35" Top Class Series ea16 
Rodney Fun ScreenSI Tornado 45" 

Rome 29" Treasure Cove 35 

Rule Engagment 239" Treasur Matti StomvSS 
Sdence Adventure 42 Treasure Mountain 35 
Scooter Magk; Castl32 Treehouse 35 

SaaWe Deix 32 Tristan PinbaJ 29* 

Seal Team 37" Turtx) Sdenoe 30 

Scrt Weapn Luftwf 29" Turtle Tools 69 

Tour of Duty ea. 20 UtBmaT 47" 

Seven Cities GoW 38 Forge of Virtue 17 
Shadow President 39" SilvefSeed 19" 
Shadowcaster 47* Ultima 7 Part 2 47* 
Shadowlands 29" Ultima Trilogy 37" 
Slen-a Action Five 25 Ultima Trilogy 2 47" 
Sien-a Award Winner47 Ultima Underworid 47* 
Skjna Family Fun 32 Part 2 47* 



Siena Starter Bndl 39* 
Silent Service 2 19" 
Sim Ant 
Sim Ant French 
Sim City Oassk: 

Windows 
Sim Earth 



34' 
35 
25" 
25' 
39' 



Ultrabots 37" 

Uninvited Window 37" 
Unnecessry RoughSS" 
U.S.ASasDOS 31 



Utopia 

V for Victory (ea) 

Vista Pro 



Sim Life Do^Wind 39" Vocattulary Devi 

Sing a Long Wind 31" Wacky Funslen 

Snap Dragon 32 War In Gulf 

Snoopy Game Oub 29 War In Russia 



Sditaiie Window 
Solitaires Joumey 
Space Ace 2:Bort 
Spai% Adventure 
Space Hulk 
Space Ouesi 5 
Spear o( Destiny 
Special Forces 
Spectre 
Spellbound 
Spellcastjng Ml 
Spelf-it Plus 
SpelUammer 
Sports Adventure 
Star Control 2 



29* 
42* 
73* 
32 
19" 
29" 
45" 



29* Warrior of Legend 19" 

35 Wayne Gretzlw 3 35 

36 Waynes Wortd 29" 
42 Vfliafs My Angle 30 

37" V/hen2Woridsl/^ar35" 
Where Crmn SanDiego 
America Past 34" 



39' 

39' 
29 

K" 
31 
35 
30 

37" 
33 

35^' 



Europe 

Space 

Time 

USA 

USA Deluxe 

Worid Deluxe 
Wild Science Ajtad35" 
Ween:Proph6Cy 34* 



30 

44" 

30 

30 

44* 

44* 



Star Trek 25lti Anfv. 37 Wing Co(iiandr'2 47* 

StarTrek AudioCllp34* Wing Com AcadmSl* 

Nexl Generation 38* World Circuit 34" 

StarTrek Screen Sav37 MPE Edition 44" 

Stickybr Math Tutor 30 Worid Tour TBnnis32" 

Stickybr Pre-Sck)o(30 V/orid Warit 35" 

Stickybr Read Tutor 30 X Wing 39" 

Stickybr Spell Tutor 30 Mission Disk 19" 

Storylwok Weaver29" Vofti Spelling Trick29" 

Strike Commander 45* Zodiac Signs 39* 

Speedi Disk 17 Zoo Keeper 36 

Strip Poker 3 32 Zuo's Spelling Adv 22 

Data Disk (ea) 17 Adv of Eoo Island 22 

Stronghold 37" Dirtosaur Worid 22 



store: 1060 Randolph Ave. Rahway M.J. 



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Circle Reader Service Number 208 



Software 



Mon - Fri: 8am - 9 pm Sal: 7:30 am - 7:30 pm Sun; 9 am - 7:30 pm EST 



international Orders: (317) 878-4738 FAX Orders: (317) 878-4751 



COD 



Ctiestnut CD- 
NEW TITLES 



ROi\/l Price Riot! 

Complete Bookshop 




Complete Home 
and Office Legal 
Guide 




From the authors of the BBS 
t:k;-',v= jji "=":£-„ j Legal Guide. Contains 500 legal 
^')&1' I""" .^S^r-'ofi^s. including; contracts let- 
ters, legal forms, commercial leases, residential leases, 
business legal "checklists", home legal "Checklists" 
(eslate planning, wills). The disc also contains a large 
annotated law library including: Selected US Supreme 
Court Cases 1989-92, Internal Revenue Code; Uniform 
Commercial Code; IVIodel Business Corp. Act; [(Modern 
Penal Act; Unilorm Probate Coda; Bankruptcy Code: 
Rules of Federal Procedure; Rules of Criminal 
Procedure: Rules of Appellate Procedure; Rules of 
Evidence, plus many more annotated laws. 

Computer Reference Library 

Complete step-by-step software 
and hardware tutonals for most 
popular programs. An invalu- 
able aid for novice and experi- 
ence computer users. Includes 
tutorials for dBase III and IV, 
WordPerfect, Lotus 1-2-3, 
..-. filicrosoft Word, Windows 3.1, 
fVlS-DOS, Ventura Publisher, PC-Write. Clipper, plus 
many more popular software packages. Languages, 
such as C++, Turbo Pascal, and Basic are also cov- 
ered, as are hardware subjects such as interrupts, con- 
flicts, port configuration, system optimizing, networking, 
troubleshooting, and more. Shareware. 

Gardening 

I A handbook for (he home gar- 
dener! Includes garden plan- 
ning, layout, landscaping, pest 
control, herbology, and planting 
instructions for just about every- 
thing. Hundreds of black and 
white clipan plus full color pho- 
tos can be used for plant and 
flower identification and as clipart. Includes reference 
guides for organic gardening methods, xeriscaping, 
and composting. Shareware. 

POPULAR FAVORITES 




Bibles & Religion 



All popular Nevi & Old Testament versions, Talmud 
portions. Book of f^ormon, concordances, study 
guides, membership/fund raising , commentaries, and 
newsletters. Includes many translations of the Old and 
New Testaments, including Greek. This disc covers 
Judaism, Christianity. Shareware. 



Clipart Goliath 



Over 1 1,Q0O images in PCX and TIF formats, plus 
some file in cotor-TlF/PCX, IvIAC, GIF. Files can be 
imported to PageHdaker, Corel. Adobe lliustrator. First 
Publisher, Ventura, plus vinually every commercial 
desktop publisliing program available. 



$12 




a 




An entire bookshop on a CD-ROfid! Includes classics, 
poetry, humor, cookbooks, Amehcan history and found- 
ing documents, novels, short stories, home improvement 
guides, computer instruction guides, and lots more! 
Shareware. 

Deathstar Arcade Battles 

The best coiiection of exciting arcade games all on one 
CDI Space wars, shoot-em-ups, auto racing, sports, casi- 
no gambling, and more! Shareware. 

Dictionaries & Languages 

' 'A giant compilation of dictionaries, 
jQ^thesauruses, word processors, 
[QlEjQB slyle/syntax checkers, glossaries, 
lessons in French, German, Italian, 
Hebrew, Russian. Czech, Greek. 
Japanese. Spanish, Cantonese 
and MORE! Includes many humor- 

cryptogram solvers, industry-specific spell-checkers, plus 
the latest versions of the top shareware word processors. 
Shareware. 

Encyclopedia of Sound 

I Produced by the The Music 
Factory, The Encyclopedia of 
'sound contains 250 sound files, 
3r^ ■ -' 'L including sound effects, voices, 
a^ .\ -"■; til' music clips, and full length original 
tT:n. ^*i!S'^ •■ musical scores which may be 
"~^ •S^t^ rS-'^lf used royalty-free for a wide vari- 
jS-.s&iiJ =i.'^5="~ eiy q( applications. The files are 
supplied in Windows' WAV format, and are (DDD) digital- 
ly recorded, mastered, and duplicated in full-range 
stereo. Also includes a large number of sound utilities. 

HAM Radio 

An enormous collection of HAM and SWL programs and 
data! Includes packet radio, satellile communications, 
frequency lists, equipment service.'deslgn'mods, logging, 
news, SSTV. FAX, FCC regulations, exams, plus more. 
This disk is for HAMs, Shorlwave Listeners (SWL). 
Communications Engineers and students, and electron- 
ics hobbyists. Shareware. 

Our Solar System 

Exciting obsen/atory, NASA, 
USSR, European Space Agency, 
and Japanese and photos of the 
planets, moons, comets, earth, 
other galaxies, and other celestial 
phenomena! Includes star loca- 
tors, planetarium programs, 
jastronomical data, voyage simu- 
lators, NASA hews releases, plus tons more! Shareware. 

Shareware Overload 

Packed with over 5100 programs (550mb) all com- 
pressed for all applications, with an emphasis on Games 
and Windows. Subjects include Business, Clipart, 
Communications - BBS. Database. Education, Finance. 
Games (lots of 'em), Graphics, Misc applications. 
Programmers' Tools. Religion, Sound, Utilities, Windows- 
based programs, and Word Processors. Shareware. 




Sound Sensations 




Adds multimedia excite- 
ment your system! 
Includes tons of sound 
, J^, j^ effects, full length musical 
■|'"|if scores, format conversion 
^ utilities, multimedia soft- 
ware, music files, jukebox- 
iisET: es, voices, sound clips, 
music voices in a variety of file formats! Supports 
MIDI, SoundBlaster, Adiib, Covox, Disney, 
Roland, plus many others cards and devices. 
Shareware. 

TechnoTools 

A programmer's dream disc! Routines, utilities. 
debuggers, troubleshooters and other program- 
mers tools for C/C-f +, dBase, Clipper, Basic, 
Assembly. Al, Unix, Xenix. 0S,'2, Pascal, Ada, 
Fortran, Cobol, Btrieve, APL, Lisp, Forth, and 
more! Shareware. 

Too Many Typefonts 

J514 TrueType fonts; 393 
-f^pk>t^yi 'A™ ('^'^°^^ Type 1) 




X,M"«1 



fonts, plus other typefonts 
), in all formats- The disc 
'.\,c°X'';'' also includes typeface 
jj -£^ modifiers, font managers 
^and uploaders, transla- 
Itors, and tons of printer 
utilities for PosJscripl, DMP. HPLJ printers. 
Shareware. 

Windoware 

An excellent disc packed with lens of useful pro- 
grams: typefonts, font installers, games, home 
business, education, wallpaper, icons, utilities, 
system optimizers, and more! For Win 3,1 +up. 
Shareware. 

World Traveler Vol. 1 

Photographers Michael 
McGrath and Paul 
Elmendorf have combined 
their extensive collections 
for a breathtaking multime- 
dia slide show. The high 
resolution images which 
may be used royalty-free 
Nor a wide variety of appli- 
caiions. The files are supplied in PCX and GIF for- 
mat, and are fully digitized and color corrected. 
The multimedia user-interface is simple and easy 
to use. The disc also Includes a large number of 
graphics utilities. 




No Clubs to Join! 

No Gimmicks! 

Just LOW . 

LOW Prices! 



Order with O^ick. Moray Order. VISA, MasterCard. American Express, or COD, Order by ptione, mall, orfajt. ISEote: there Is qq surcharge tor cradJt cart orde^ For ifiecontiguojs U.S.. CD ROM sohwar& shpoina i$ S5 QQ per order fnot tula}: 
or 59.50 if COD, Waska. Hawajt, PuerEo Rico. Mexco arxj Canada add 38 CO per CD ROM sottiwara Qrjlfi£ for shipping Costs tor snipping hardware, or. ordprs to foreign CQunire;; r^: -^^n- 2"e<i. are quoted al time ol order. \r,tiiar.A rgsfdents 
please add 5% sa'es tax ]S£ot'esports;ble for Typographical errors. Please research /our product purchases as aJl sales a-e (irai An products are covered by manufacturers wairar:. ^- :„: -^rr. -.a'aSiiii^afesLibectto charsge im j^^aLit naiice 



Free Spirit Software, Inc. Free Spirit Software, inc. - PC Box 158 - 109 W Pearl Street - Trafalgar, IN 46181QuestJons? Phone (317) 878-5348 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 



mim Software 



1-800-638-5757W 

Mon - Fri: Sam - 9 pm Sal: 7:30 am - 7:30 pm Sun: 9 am - 7:30 pm EST t,& 



International Orders: (317) 878-4738 FAX Orders: (317) 878-4751 



Chestnut" *1 5 

C D ■ ft D W S I '^ifLu 

Bibles & Religion ■ Mew& Old Teslaments slydy guides, covets Judaism, ChrjsTianiiy, Islam 
Cliparl Golialh ■ Thousands Ot images !or all uses, in PCX & TIFF foimat' For DTP programs 
Encyclopedia of Sound Over 250 sound hies by The Music Factory in WAV loiiriai 
Compleie Bookshop - An entirtj bookshop Includes: classics, poeliy, humot. history, morel 
Dealhslar Arcnde Baltics ■ EiiC>\\r\Q VGA space wars. shoolam-L;p3. sports. S more 
Dictionaries & Language - Diction anos, ihosaurus, word prcc. style sped ch^chcrs, Foreign languages 
HAM Radio v3.0 ■ Packel radio, satellile, licQ lists. sq:vicb, mods, SSTV. FCC regs. exams, morel 
Our Sola r Syslem • Excilmg NASA pholos & planetarium programs , star-planet locators 
Shareware Overload! - 600M8. oH kinds ol apphcalions. ZIPPED! Lois ol Windows progs, S. games 
Sound SensationsI - Sound Effects, voices, music, ulils, for AdLb & So jnBiaster, S other cards 
TechnoTools ■ C:C--, Basic, dBase, networking, Unijc, OS'2. Windows, assembly, Pascal, morel 
Too Many Typefonls Countless typefonts in ATM, T.rueType. Gbostscript, HP Laser, and more. 
Window/are - Utiiiii^s. wallpaper, education, icons, font msiailers, games, and moie for Windows 
World Traveler ■ Pho:os by Michael McGraih & Paul Flmendorl in PCX and GIF format 

^EVV/Chesnut CD-ROM Titles 
Legal Gufde - 500 legal forms fomn the authors of BBS LegaJ GukJe 
Gardening - Hancbook for the home gardener with fayout, planting instnjctions. etc. 
Computer Refefence Library - Step-by-step hardware and software tUonals. 




CD-ROM Hardware 



Backpack CD (Transportable) 369.00 

Milsurni CD-ROW HH IniernaJ 169.00 

Texel DM3Q24 id/ive only) 359 00 

Toshiba XM 3401B (drtve only) 399 00 

Sounei Boards 

Pj-Q Audio Spectrum 1 6 1 79.00 

Bound Blaster De'ute 99,00 

Soundblasier 16 ASP 219-00 



CD Caddies 

Sony Type 

$5.00 



CD ROM 
MuUimedia 
Magazine 
Information 
on latest 
CD-ROM 
releases 
'3.00 



Sony CDU-561 -^ MediaVision PAS16SCSI + Speakers + 1 Software Bundle 

_ •^►leao CD-50 -f MediaVision PAS16SCSI + Speakers + 1 Software Bundle 

^J^^^Texel DM3024 -k MediaVision PAS16SCSI + Speakers + 1 Software Bundle 

^(£££^LMS! 206 + MediaVision PAS16LM + Speakers + 1 Software Bundle 

CD-Farmal : Audio-Combined, Mode 1 S 2 Data Discs, CD-Audio Discs. CD-ROM XA (pictures). 
Audio cor^patibilily; MFC and MS Windows with MultiMedia. AdLib, Sound Blaster, & Real Sound. 

Software for Bundles Above {Please order by number) 
MPC Softv/are Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas, MPC World Atlas, 
MPC The Animals!, MPC Guiness Book Of World Records (1993) 

QB 
MPC Software Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas. MPC World Atlas, 
MPC The Animals!, Reference Library 

QB 
MPC Software Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas, MPC World Atlas, 
MPC Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, MPC ChessMaster 3000 

QB 
The Secrets of Monkey Island (5 Languages), Sport's Bes!(3 gamas, 4 languages), 
MPC Wizard, CICA Windows Programs S Utilities. Jets and Props, World View 

QB 
The Secrets of Monkey Island (5 Languages), Sport's Best(3 games, 4 languages), 
Languages Of Ihe World (Windows), CICA Windows Programs & Utilities, Kodak 
Photo CD Access (Windows) 



A 
% 

US 





Need more descriptions? Call for our latest catalog. 



Over mi CD-ROM Software Titles In Stock! 



Arr;erican Business Pti Bk 
Autodesk Explorer 
Briiannica Select Software 
Business Library V1 
Business Waster 



69 00 Eye of the Beholder 3 
35,00 Fly & Drive Spectacular 
59.00 Four Oueens Comptf Casino 
1<9 00 (jame Arena 
1S.00 Game Pack II 
1900 Games 1993 
29 00 Games (or DOS 

Game ware Collection 
19 00 Mousy o( Games 
19.00 Hyper Bac3<gaTimon 



19.00 Iridiana Jones Fate Atlantis 45.00 Killer Trah CD 



SpacSn Time & Art 

29.00 Video lor WIndO'Wg 

69.00 View from Earih 

19.00 Visions ot Saturn 

45,00 VGA Spectrum 1 

19 00 VGASp?Cirum2 
CD Lists Southern Calitornia 59.00 World ci Trams 
Essential Home & 9us CoEl 33.00 Edt/CJJ^onaf 

Home Office Software 30.00 Anirinls. The 

Lotus 123 CD-ROM 89.00 Barney Boar School 

Mavis Beaccn Teaches Typing 25 00 BprntiyBear Sp^^ce 
Mi^crosoll Works 45.00 Barron's Book Notes 

My Advncd Label Designer 33.00 BerJilz Think £ Talk French 

North An-erican FaK Book 29,00 BerJilz Think & Ta!k German 1D9.00 Kings Cues! 5 

Pro Phone 1 992 39,00 Berliiz Think S Talk liaNan 1 09.00 Lasersofl Top Tracks 

Pro Phone 1 993 99 00 Berlil? Think S Talk Spanisti 1 04 00 Leader Board Collection 

49.00 Bntannica FamiJy Choice 

dSOO Carmen San Diego 
Secreis Executive Success 29hOO Comptcn's Family Choice 
Clipart & Graphics DIncisaurs 

29.00 Education Masior 

S7.00 Electricity & Magnetism 

33. 00 European Monarchs 



d9.0D Jewel Cases 

45,00 Ughlnirig 

39.00 Nautilus BacPac VI 

15.00 Nsutilus Bac Pac V2 

25.00 Nautilus Mini Subscrisiion 

25.00 Romware Magazine 

15,00 PC Medic 

19.00 Up AH Night 

19.00 Music & Sound 

39.00 Encyclopedia ot Sojnd 



39.00 Jokes & Pranks 
105 CO Jusi Games 



Pro Phone Business 1993 



tSOO MIDf Connection 
19.00 MIDI Music Shop 
23.00 Resource Library Audio 
49.00 Sights & Sounds 
25,00 Sound Effects Library 

21 00 Loom 25,00 Sound Library 

25,00 Lost Treasures Inlooom VI 49.00 Win CD 

29.00 Lost Treasures Intocom V2 49.00 Proprsmmlnp 



Action 

Animation Magic 

Apollo (Space Series:) 

Audubon Birds 

Audubon Mammals 

CO Cad 3.7 

Cliparl Gatore 

C 11 pan Goliath 

Cliparl Heaven 

Clipmasler Pro 

Co^or Magic 

Core) Alt Show III 

Deep Voyage 

Desk'op Put) Dream Disk 

Famaiia Fonts & Sounds 

Foni Funtiouse 

Fracturtes 

GIFs Galore 

Home Designer DOS'WIN 

Hot News Animations 

Jeis & Props 

Jus! Fonts 

Key Fonis Pro 

Kodak Photo CD Access 

Made in the USA 

Mega Clip CD 

MPC Wizard 

Mother ol All Clip An 

Puijiishers Paradise 

Publish ti 2 (DOS) 

Publish il 3.0 (Win) 

QufcktDOns 

Reel Clips 

Renaissance Wlaslers 1 

Renaissance Maslers 2 

Resource Library Graphics 

SFX 

So Much Screenware 



25.C0 
2S.00 
25.00 
25.00 
15.00 
25.00 
30.00 
19,00 
39.00 
35.00 
29.00 
29,00 
33.00 



Kid's Can Read: 

Aesop's Fables 

Cinderella 

HeaihEjr Hits Her Isl Hame Run 

Long Hard D^iy Ai The Ranch 



79,00 Manlis 

15 00 PC SIG World ol Game& 

39.00 Pentomino 

29.00 Private Eye Mysteries 

Putt Putt Joins the Parade 

Ringworid 

Sci Fi Fantasy 

Secret '■ LuflwaUe 

Secret Monkey island 



Moving Gi/Bs Mo A Siomach Ache Seventh Goes'. 



Mud Puddle 

Paperbag Princess 

Scay Poems For Rollen Kids 

Tale Of Benjamin Bunny 

Tale Ot Peter Habilt 

Thomas' Snowsuit 

Your Choice 25.00 each 

29.00 Learn Speak Spanish 

15 00 Learning At Home 



Sherlock Cons I 

Sherlock Cons 2 

Sherlock Cons 3 

Space Ouiesi IV 

Tnple Tris Challenge 

Whacky Funster 

Willy Beamish 
59 00 Wing CMDR 2 Sec Missions 
25.QO Literature 



^.00 Let's Play 25.00 Aesops Fables 

29.00 f-^aslering Maih 5900 Complete Bookshop 

29.00 MacffliHan Dctnary lorChiidren39.0O Classic Collection 
19.00 Monarch Moies 57.00 Desktop Bookshelf 

29.00 Multimedia Computer Tutor 19.D0 Hound of Baskervilles 
25.00 Nat Geog Mammals 25.00 intefacsive Stoiytime Vt 

29.00 Playing w. Language Engtish 29.00 Interaciive Storytime V2 
19-00 Playing w. LanQuage French 29 OO Interactive Slorylime V3 
14,00 Playing 'Language Japanese 29 00 Jusi Grandma & Me 
15,00 Playing w. Language Spanish 29.00 Kaas Hunting 
25 00 Vocabu earn Spanish 45-00 Magaiine Rack 

19,00 Entettaiftment M.«ed Up M Goose 

S9 00 Arthur's Teacher Trouble 
35.00 Battle Chess 
33.00 Chess Maniac Nat Laitvpoon 
29,00 Chessmaster 3000 

«« DUNE 49.00 c.^... 

19.00 in slock CD Speedway 

29,00 Classic Collection 



19.00 AulhDiware Star 

1 5-00 C Source Users Lib 

25.00 IBM Library lor AIX 

45. DO IBM Network Softcopy Coll 

55.00 LAN Master 

56.00 MS.DOS Collection 

23.00 Power Tools lor DOS 

25.00 Power Tools lor Windows 

25.00 ProgramTTiers ROM 

49.00 Simtel 20 

25.00 Souffle C CD 

47.00 XllftS'.GNU 

59.00 Relerencs 

1 9-00 Aircraft Encyclopedia 

33.00 Bibte Library 

25.00 CD HOW Deluxe Par:< 

19.00 Cinemanna 

55-00 Complon Upgrade fi Switch 

Consumer Inlormation 
30-00 Did Living Woikl 
15.00 EncycWin 1.0, S.T. 
59.00 Family Doctor 
15-00 Food Analyst 
39.00 Guiness 1992 
29.00 Guines 1 993 
35.00 Health S, Medical Directory 
33.08 History ol the World 



1 00 ProsaipL Drugs 
69 00 Releronce Lib, S.T, 
39,00 Return to the Moon 
39.00 Total Baseball 1993 
27-00 USA Slate Facibook 
15.00 Shareware 

19-00 All American Shw galore 
1 9,00 Amsolt World Ham Radio V2 

Between Heaven & Hell 
15 00 Calilornia CoiiectioFi 
19.00 CICA Windows 
49.00 Cream ol Ihe Crop 
19.00 Hacker Chronicles 
19-00 Hall ol Fame 
25-00 Ham Call Apnl 1993 
27.00 Libris Britannica 
25.00 M'M Shw Eiplosion 
29.00 Mtnerva III 

Monster Media '93 
33.00 NigtllOwlO 
25.00 Orig Snwre "92 

9.00 PC SIG 12 

9.00 Phoenix 3.0 
25.00 Phoenin phun & Games 
15.00 QRZ Ham Radio 
1 5-00 Shareware '93 



29.00 



AdulH lanr21 OHLV) 



25.00 101 Sexual Posilions VI 
33.00 101 Sexual Positions V2 
43.00 Adult Rel Library 
29-00 Adventure ol Bultman 

After Dark Trilogy 
19.00 Ail Beauties 
29.00 Animation Fantasies 1 
35.00 Animation Fantasies 2 
15,00 Asian Ladies 
15 00 Best ol Vivid 
29.00 Busty Babes 
25.00 Busting Out iVivid Digilall 
15,00 Cafe Flesh 
47,00 Deep Throat 
45.00 Diaital Dfearns 
1 9,00 Dirly Talk 
19.00 Ecstasy 
29.00 Erotic Encounters 
26-00 E«OIic Girls 
15.00 Foxes 
29.00 Gilly Gold 
15.00 Girls ol Vivid VI 
25.00 Gills ol Vivid V2 
19.00 Hidden Obsessions 
25.00 Hot Pix 2 



15.00 Shwie Extravaganza (4 disks) 39.00 Hot Prx 3 



29.00 Shaieware Gold 2 
15.00 Shareware Heaven 
19 00 Shareware Magic 
25 00 Shareware Peilen 2 
Shareware Sludio 2 
25.00 Sohware Vault 2 
35,00 Super CD 
29 00 Super CD 2 
59 00 Top 2000. Shwra 
B9 00 Ultimate Games Collection 
19.00 Ultimate Shwre Coll 
39,00 Wild Cal Gold 
47.00 Window Master 
23.00 Windows 1993 
39.00 Winware »3 
15.00 Wizpadi 
27-00 Travel 

109-00 Global Explorer 
59.00 Great Cities VI 



36 00 Holy Bible & Chnslian Shware 19.00 Greal Wonders World VI 



29.00 Moglj's Brottiers 

25.00 Old Testament 

■S5.00 World Lib Classic Book Coll 

2500 Miscellaneous 

tool Utilities 



35,00 Home Remedies 
29.00 JS New Prague Cookoook 
19.00 King James Bible 
35.00 Languages ot World 
69.00 M S Bookshelf 93 
49.00 Mayo Clinic 

Microsoft Encarla 
1 5-00 MM Animals Encyclopedia 
5.00 Murmurs ot Earth 
57.00 Oxford English Rel Lib 
69.00 Plant Doctor 



33-00 Hong Kong At Its Best 
25.00 Hospitality Index 
19.00 National Paiks 
29-00 New York at ils Best 
55.00 PC GlotK 
25.00 Street Atlas USA 
249.1X3 US Atlas w Automap 
45.00 World Atlas 3,2 
45.00 World Atlas WariO IS Missing 

99.00 Woild Alias us Atlas Combo 

27.00 World Vista 



19.00 Hot Pix 4 

19.00 House ol Sleeping Beauties 

39.00 Island Girls 

29.00 Legend ol Kama Sutra 

20.00 Local Girls 

1 5.00 Lovely Ladies II 

1 9.00 Moving Fantasies 

29.00 My Pnvale Collec 1 

25.00 My Private (3ollec 2 

1S.0O Nflhtwatch 

30 00 PC Pix 1 

45.00 PC Pix 2 

19,00 Physical Therapy 

25,00 Porkware 1 

25.00 Porkware 2 

19-00 Pnv Pict I 

Rimfiie Paciric Video Clipart 
89 00 Seedy Movies 
25.00 Seventh Heaven 
3500 Smutware 
19.00 Southern Beauties 
29 00 Stareware 

29 00 Storm t 
19-00 Storm II 
4900 Storm III 
69-00 Swimwear 1993 
29 00 Visual Fantasies 
19-00 Volcano 
25.00 Wicked 
27 00 Women of Venus 



39-M 
39,C0 
25. DO 
49.00 
35,C0 
29-CO 
33-00 
29.C0 
29.DO 
39.C0 
29-00 
39.C0 
33.00 
39.C0 
25.00 
39,00 
29.00 
30.00 
25.00 
25.00 
33.00 
33.00 
33-00 
45.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30,00 
35,00 
1S.00 
39,00 
15,00 
30,00 
29.00 
33 OO 
33 00 
49.00 
33.00 
33.03 
19.00 
30-03 
30-03 
30.03 
39.03 
33.03 
33-03 
25.03 
43.03 
29.03 
30-03 
30.03 
30.03 
25.03 
29.03 
29.03 
39.03 
29.03 



49.00 Pro«f Ol age required 

Order with Check Money Order, VISA. MasterCard, Amerji;an Express, or COD Drrlei by pnone mail or fax Note: there is nQ surrrharge for ryedil rrarcl orders. For ihe contiguous U S . CD. ROM soltwarc shipp,rfl is 55.00 per order [noi title); 
59 50 if COD Alaska Hawaii, Puerio R'co, Mexico and Canada addi S8 00 per CD-ROW software order for shipping Costs lor shipping hardware, or, orders to foreign countnes not mentioned, are quoted al lime of order, fndiana residents 
rase acd 5*i sales tax Not responsible lo' typographical errors Please research your produci purchases as a . sa'es are final. All products are covered by manufacturer's warranty Prices ana avaiiabihiy are subjerrt trr change without notice. 



Free Spirit Software, Inc. Free Spirit Software, Inc. - PC Box 158 - 109 W Pearl Street - Trafalgar, IN 46181Questions? Phone (317) 878-5348 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 




WOXDHItFICT IIX.O C tin. ra.l / 
l-tnlntttiitiiiit ^-hilrrinntiitw 
J-AJvfinririt 4-Tfp\ itiitf Tiifks 
S-S.l wMluiMluIr 
Am J l:ipts S.WIM m Single Tai'e-Sfi'i 

WORCriltFICT 5.1/WIHOOWS iJfov 



J-AiivaiKi-tt ■/- /i;ir tinJ 'fnvh 



learn Your Software 
In Two Hours... Guaranteed! 

OURCERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS TEACH YOU THE POWERFUL FEATURES OF YOUR SOFTWARE THROUGH THE ADVAN. 
TAGES OF VIDEO TRAINING- TRY ANY OF SOFTVISION'S EASY-TO-FOLLOW VIDEOS AT NO RISK UNDER THE TERMS 
ON OUR UNCONDITIONAL 30-DAY MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. CALL, MAIL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY. 



EHTERHATIDNAl.L.C. 

1 240 Eau SOO N'onh 

Ortm, Utah 84057 U.S.A. 

fm: (801) 3I5-85S9 



TO ORDER CALL 

l-lll!il-S-4 VIS 

(1 -800- 748-4746) 

CmtOni l-»00-563-l069 

U.K.: 0793 8499% 



Visa. NfuslcrCani. ASSEX. Money Orders. Purchase Oidcn. 
aad checks accepted. Pleu^ inJicaic video title, quantity, 
spccbl citTcr if applicable, shipping billing ^uUrciii. ^rni phune 
Tiumbcr. All cakrs prccc^sfd saiiic day as received. ..-^dd S6 for 
single lape ortiers. Si 2 for multiple (up to-ll tape orders for 
shipping and handling. Utah rcsiiknts add 6.25"^ saks tax. 



WORDPEKFECT 4.9 FOR OFFICE 12 hr^. , 
I-lnlntlui-lni! 2-htlrniir'Jiillf 
i-Attviinrnt -/'/j/r* ittut Trirk^ 
' 11 4 la|KN-S IW.',IS i.r Slogli: lapc-««.W 

tOPERFECT 5.1 OR S.O/OOS (2 liry . 



Ml 4 I.15KS S I rii).i»5 ur Sinslc Tapc-SJft^ 



WORDPERFECT FOR VMS <:im. nr) 
i ■litlritltiiittii 2'lnlnnu'ititltv 
.i-AiliVmril -t-lil', <l«'l IrkU 
AlU lapcs -S7M.95 or Sinflc Tapc-S I'JMS 

WORDPIRFECT FOR MAC 12 lirr. ™.l 
I'titlrmttuiit^ 2-hitrrtitfitittlt' .^-/Wkwjjci/ 
All < lj|iCN-!il I'J.V.^ or Silicic Tape-SJiJ.M 

AN IHTRODUCnON TO DOS 4.0 fWlmin. eii.l 
^t-PiM One 21'ttrl Two iPan Three -, 
~«} teiKs-S M9.9J or .Single Tapc-SW "" 

^MICROSOFT WINDOWS ivamiil ea.) i 
t-l*tuHtnr 2f'inl'h\t> .t-t'cn-f Three - 
All J Ii«|x;»-5I4').«5 nr Sinillc iaiK-Mi'*.9S' 

UNIX TUTORIAL 0I5KETTI [J.S'J .SW,'« 

UNIX SYSTEMS ADMIHISTRATIOH AND 
TROUIU SHOOTING DISK iJ.J-1 SV(.')5 

WOIUOOKS FOR VtDEO TRAINIH5 



Circle Reader Service Mumber 166 



LABELWRiTER II 
PLUS 

If you're tired of feeding la- 
bels into your printer or 
(shudder) typewriter, you'll 
find relief in CoStar's Label- 
Writer II Plus. 

This cute little label print- 
er attacties to your system's 
serial port (leaving your par- 
allel port free for your full- 
size printer). It uses tfiermal 
printing tecfinology to print la- 
bels up to 2.44 inches wide 
at 138 dpi. (CoStar's less- 
expensive LabelWriter II lim- 
its print width to 1 .22 incties 
but is othenwise identical.) 

The bundled DOS and 
Windows software makes 
the LabelWriter II Plus a 
pleasure to use. I did most 
of my design work with the 
Windows version, which 
includes an address book, a 
list book (a minidatabase for 
nonaddress-type label 
entries), and Designer, a min- 
iature desktop publishing pro- 
gram just for labels. The ad- 
dress and list books can 

160 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



r)fe.si(iiier-DlSKETTE.LAY 



Ble £dtt Objects lext Yiew Address Help 



^W 



%mif 



eg] 

STAR 



CoStar LabelWriter 




i^i 



difketle \ibt\ w/b&f cDife Shipping S3(i25& ,Mi^ 257KS1 UAli^cked 



The CoStar LabelWriter II Plus includes LabelWriter it Designer 
software, a desktop publisi^ing program just for labels^ 



read and write dBASE- and 
CSV-format files, making it 
easy to bring in your current 
data. Designer lets you 
place text in any TrueType 
font, as well as black-and- 
white BfvlP, TIF, and PCX 
graphics, on your labels. 
Even at 138 dpi, the labels 
look very professional and 
jaggy-free. The LabelWriter 
II Plus will print U.S. Postal 
Service Postnet bar codes, 
as well as the standard 



Code 39, 1-2/5, EAN8, and 
EAN 13 bar codes which 
small-business owners 
might find useful, fvly favor- 
ite feature, though, is the in- 
credibly useful AuloPrint, 
which will automatically 
print an address label when 
you print a letter from Word 
for Windows, Ami Pro, or 
WordPerfect for Windows. 
You can also print an ad- 
dress from the clipboard. 
The DOS software has sim- 



ilar capabilities and can also 
automatically print address- 
es from your printer output. 
Although the program, 
which installs as a TSR, is 
quite powerful, you'll proba- 
bly prefer the graphical ver- 
sion if you have Windows, 

You'll find that standard 
address labels (in yellow or 
white, or clear), larger ship- 
ping labels, labels for 3'/?- 
inch disks, and labels for 
the tops and spines of VHS 
videotapes are readily avail- 
able at most office-supply or 
computer stores. The ther- 
mal labels are reasonably 
priced, ranging from just un- 
der two cents to about five 
cents apiece; this is much 
less expensive than most la- 
ser-printer labels. The Label- 
Writer II Plus pays for itself 
many times over in the con- 
venience it provides. 

DENNY ATKIN 



CoSlar 

(203) 661-9700 
LabelWriter II Plus— $299.95 
LabelWriler II— $249.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 45S C3 



CHIPS & BITS inc. «oches,e^°V?°05?^^ 

IBM MAC & AMIGA GAMES FOR LESS Call 800-699-4263 

Shipping (0 US,PH,AK,HI,APO & FPO S4 per order. Air Maii to Canada S6 per order. Handling SI per shipment. Iflt'l 802—767—3033 

2 Business Day Air US S6 per order; PR, HI S12 1st item + S2ea.add'[;AKS191sl Item + S2 ea. addl. HandiingSI per shipment r- onn -ref-T ooon 

Eurape.S. America Air IMall $19 1 St Hem + $6 aa.add'l. Aala^ Austraiia, Africa. Air Mall S25 Ist ttam + $6 ea. add'l. Handling $1 p«f •h)pni«nt rBX OMC.— t'Of—OOOA 



IBM HARDWARE 



AdLib Sound Card S34 

Adiib Gold Sound Card S99 
Adv Gravis Uitrasound $129 
Fiiglit Siicli Joyslicit S36 
Flight Stick Pro Joyslidi S59 
Maxx Cobra Fiighlstick S54 
Media Concept S&9 

Pilot Control Stand S20 

Pro Audio Spectrum 16 3159 
Sound Blaster Deluxe S89 
Snd Blaster Pro Deluxe S1 29 
Sound Blasterte ASP S219 
SBIasler Discovery 8 S399 
SBIaster Discovery 16 3469 
SBIasler Edutainmnt B 5448 
SBIaster EtJulainmnt 188519 
Sound Galaxy BX2 S65 

Sound Galaxy NX2 379 

Sound Gaiaxy NXPRO S1 19 
Snd Galaxy NXPRO 161169 
Snd Galaxy Multimedia S399 
SniJ Galaxy 16 MMedia$4g9 
Sound lulachine S94 

Ttiruslmasler PCS S59 

Ttimstmasler PCS Pro 399 
Thnjstmasler Game CardS27 
Thrustmasler Rudder CSS99 
Ttirustmaster WCS II S99 
Voice Blaster 364 



IBM CD ROM 



12 Roads Gettsyburg S48 
71h GuBsl S54 

7lh Guest 2:1 llh Hour S65 
Aegis: Guardian of Pleet S54 
Airworks Music Library S34 
Alone in the Darl< 546 

Americans in Space $41 
B17 Flying Fortress $42 
Blue Force: Next of Kin S44 
Buzz Aldrin Flace Space S59 
Castles 2 S50 

Curse ol Enchantia S26 
Cyber Space S3e 

Day of the Tentacle S45 

Discoveries of the Deep S37 
348 
351 
S36 
S42 
S36 
S4B 
S44 
S36 
330 
S44 
S36 
S52 
S42 



Oracuia 

Dracula Unleashed 
Dragon's Lair 
EcoOuest 
Eric The Unready 
Eye of the Beholder 3 
F15 Strike Eagle 2 
Fantasy Empires 
Goblliins 1 or 2 
Gunship 2000 
Guy Spy Terror Deep 
Hail Cab 
Inca 

Indy Jones Fate Aitantis 352 

Iron Helix 360 

Japanese Alive SI IS 

Jersey Devil 334 

Jutland S52 

King's Quest 6 S48 

Labyrinth S39 

Laura Bow 2 342 

Lord of the Rings S38 

Lost in Time S42 

iMk;rocosm S51 

Myst S64 

Omar Sharif on Bridge 346 

Oshkosk '92 339 

Phantasmagoria S59 

Rebal Asault S44 

Return of the Phantom S42 

Shadow ot the Comet 348 

Sheriocli Holmes 3 S51 

Sim Ant S48 

Sim City 348 

Sim Earth S48 

Slater s Chariie S42 
Star Trek 25 Anniversary S46 

Stronghold S36 

Ultima Underworld 1 & 2 S52 

Under a Killing Moon S48 



IBM ADVENTURE 



Alone in the Dark 1 or 2 
Amazon 
Amazon Trail 
Batman Returns 
Beverly Hillbillies 
Blue Force: Next of Kin 
Castle Wollenstein 
Day of the Tentacle 



Discoveries of the Deep S37 



Dragon Knight 3 

Dragon's Sptiere 

Dreamweb 

Epic 

Eric the Unready 

Flashback 

Gateway 2:Homeworld 

Hired Guns 

Homey D. Clown 

Inca2 




S49 
S42 
S3S 
S32 
S32 
S29 
834 
S32 
S27 
S42 



Indy Jones Fate Atlantis S36 



King's Quest 6 VGA 

King's Ransom 

Leisure Suit Larry 6 

Nebulas 

Out ot this World 



S42 
S38 
342 
S27 
836 



Pepper Adventure Time S29 
Police Quest 4 S42 

Prince ot Persia 2 845 

Return of the Phantom 839 
Return to Zork S46 

Riflwar Legacy VGA 837 
Ringworld 836 

Sam & Max Hit the Road 838 
Secret ot 7th Labyrinth S42 
Shadow Caster $52 

Shadowgate WIN S34 

Space Quest 6 VGA S34 
Spellcasting 301 S34 

Star Tfek:Judgment Rite S36 
Slarship 338 

Surf Ninjas $37 

Under a Killing Moon S43 
Where Amrica Past CSDS37 
Where in Europe CED 329 
Where in Space CSD DlxS44 
Where in Time CSD 832 
Where in USA CSD Olx S4S 
Where in USA is CSD 829 
Where in USA CSD DIx 349 
Where m World CSD 532 
Where in World CSD 01x552 
Yserbius 324 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 



Black Crypt 
Celtic Legends 
Challenge ot 5 Realms 
Champions 
Cobra Mission 
Companion ot Xanlh 
Dark Sun 

Dark Sun Grey Isle 
Darklands 

Daughter ot Serpents 
Dungeon Master 2 
Elvira 2 Jaws Cerberus 
Eye of the Beholder 3 



S32 
532 
344 
337 
849 
336 
552 
S34 
339 
819 
839 
819 
546 



Legacy: Realm Ot Terror 838 



Legend 

Legend of Valor 

Legenris of Drakka 

Loremasfer 

Lost Tribe 

Lure ot the Temptress 

Magic Candle 3 

MegaTraveiier 3 

Metal and Lace 

Might S Magic 3 

Might & tragic 4 

Might & Magic S 

Pirates Gold 

Protostar 

Quest for Glory 3 or 4 

Realms of Arkania 

Red Crystal 



831 
839 
838 
S29 
$29 
$37 
819 
839 
549 
824 
836 
542 
842 
839 
542 
837 
538 



'MIGHT & MAGIC: WORLD OF XEEN* Expenence tne latest 
multi-media technology on CD-ROM. This |am packed CD 
contains 2 intro sequences, 3-0 anin^ation. 256 color VGA 
graphics, thrae game endings, and much more. S42 




'METAL & LACE' 
The gorgeous Robo 
Babes are expecting 
you. They'll give you 
a welcome you won't 
soon forget. Strapped 
in Robo armor and 
loaded with special 
weapons, the Robo 
Babes Will ttave you 
gripping your joystick 
and wiggling the gim- 
':?.'. all night long. 
r.lelai & Lace contains 
violence and sexy 
graphics. 549 




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■LINKS 386 PRO' 
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Rome: Pathway to PowerS32 



Visa & MC Accepted. CODs S6, Checks Held 4 Weeks. Money 
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Shipping times not guaranteed. Check compatibility tmfore 
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Circle Reader Service Number 17S 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 



Star Trek:Next GenertionS46 

Stonekeep S52 

Stronghold S39 

Ultima 7 Black Gate 348 

Ultima? Forge of Virtue SIB 

Ultima 7.5 Serpent Isle 348 
Ultima 7.6 PI 2 SIvr Seed818 

Ultima Underworld 819 

Ultima Unrlerworid 2 846 

Unlimited Adventures S38 

Veil of Darkness 337 

Wizardry 5 834 

Wizardry 7 Crusaders 342 



IBM SIMULATION 



A10 Avenger 1993 546 

A320 Airbus 844 

AH-64 Helicopter 846 

Aces Over Europe 342 

Aces Europe Miss 1 or 2 527 
842 
827 
842 
S52 
542 
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348 
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Aces Pacific Miss Disk 
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B17 Flying Fortress 
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Delta V 

Ft t7A Stealth Fighter 
F15StnkB Eagle III 
Falr:on 3.0 
Falcon 3 Scent 
Falcon 3 Seen 2 Mig 29 833 
Fleet Defender S4B 

Great Waval Battles 344 
Great Nav Bat Amrica AtlS21 
Great Nav Bat Supr Ship 819 
Great Nav Bat Sen Build 328 
Harrier Assault SVGA 548 
Indy Car Racing 348 

Iron Helix S49 

Jump Jet 339 

Maximum OverKlii 544 

Max Overkill Miss lor2 328 
Mechwarnor 2 842 

Microsoft Flight Sim 50 349 
Pacific Stnke 552 

Privateer 852 

Sailing Simulator 3 842 

Seal Team 342 

Stnke Commander 848 

Syndicate 539 

Tie Fighter 848 

Ullrabots Sanction Earth 839 
Voice Commandr F117A518 
Voice Cmmandr F16SE3Sie 
Wing Commander 519 

W C Secret Mission 1&2 820 
Wing Commander 2 $48 
W C 2 Operation 1 or 2 522 
WC2 Speech Mod S13 
Wing Commander Acad S42 
Worid Circuit 532 

X-WIng S40 

X-Wing Mission Disk 1 320 



Adult Refarence CD 324 
Adv of Brad Stallion CD 839 
Busty Babes CD 832 

Ecstacy CD 832 

Femme Falale 826 

Fmme Falale DD 1-3 Ea SIB 
Jigsaw Pinups 819 

Lovely Ladies CD 839 

My Private Collection CD339 
PC-Pix CD 539 

Planet ol Lust 812 

Sox Olympics S12 

Sex Vixens from Space -312 
Strip Poker 3 531 

Strip Poker 3 DD 1-6 Ea. 31 9 
Strip Poker Professional 333 
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IBM SPORTS 



D.Robinson NBA Action $44 
Front Page Football $39 
Front Page Football Pro $42 
Hardball 3 $34 

Joe Montana Football 2 $42 
Links Pro 386 Goll 532 

Links Pro Course 1 or 2 S19 
Links Pro Course 3-6 Ea S20 
Microsoft Golf Windows 839 
NFL Challenge Premium 359 
NFL Coaches Club LTD 848 
NFL Football 831 

NHLPA 94 Hockey 839 

Tony La Russa 2 $36 

W. Grctzky Hockey 3 $36 
W. Gretsky Leag Sim 2 329 
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World Class Soccer $28 



IBM BUNDLES 



546 
329 
345 
S9 
324 



ADD Collector's Ed 2 
ADD Starter Kit 
Air Combat Classic 
Allied Forces 
Combat Classics 
Eye Beholder Collection 5S2 
Land Sea Air Trilogy 812 
Land Sea Air Tnlogy 2 $29 
Leisure Suit Larry BundleS39 
Lost Treasures Infocom S39 
Lost Treas Inlocom CD $39 
Lost Treasure Infocom 2 S29 
Lost Treas fnfocom 2 CDS29 
Marvel Trilogy $12 

Megafortress Mega-Pak S38 
Power Hits: Battlelech 532 
Power Hits: Movies 317 
Power Hits: Movies 819 

Power Hits: Sci Fi 319 

Power Hits: Sports 819 

Sierra Adventure Bundle 839 
Sien-a Family Fun Pak 829 
Space Quest Bundle 536 
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Ultima Tnlogy 2 S48 

Wing Commander Dlx 548 
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Wizardry Trilogy 332 



IBM STRATEGY 



A Train 334 

Breach 3 836 

Buzz Aldrin Race Space 839 



Campaign 2 
Capitalist Pig WIN 
Carriers at War 2 
Castles 2 
CivlliiatlOn 
Clash of Steel 
Conquer for Windows 
Conquered Kingdoms 
Conq Kingdoms Seen 1 $25 
Domtnion:One King Life $41 
Dune 2 $44 

Empire Deluxe $35 

Empire Deluxe Seen 1 $21 
Empire Deluxe WIN 
Epic Dwarven Tale 
Harpoon 2 
Lemmings 2: The Tribes $32 
Lost Admiral Enhanced $44 
OulPost WIN $42 

Pacific Theater Ops S42 
Perfect General 2 $44 

Rags to Riches $36 

Railroad Tycoon 2 839 

Red Zone 832 

Rules of Engagement 2 338 
Sid Heir's Civil War 558 
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Simfarm 841 

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AIIVERTISEMKNT 



TtCHNOLOGY UPDATE 



900 MHz breakthrough! 

New technology launches 
wireless speaker revolution. . . 

Rccuton develops breakthrough technology which transmits 
stereo sound through walls, ceilings and floors up to 150 feet. 



By Charles Anton 



I 






f you had to name just 

one new product "the 

most inno\'ative of the 
year," what would you 
choose? Well, at the recent liiicnmtioiml 
CimsuimT Elixtwnks Shmo, critics ga\'e Recoton's 
new wireless stereo speaker system the Dt'Si,i,'» 
niid Engineering; Award 
for being the "most in- 
novative and outstand- 
ing new product." 

Recoton was able to 
introduce this vvhole 
new generation of 
powerful wireless 
speakers due to the ad- 
vent of ym MHz tech- 
nology. This newly 
approved breaktlirough 
enables Recoton's wire- 
less speakers to rival the 
sound of expensive 
wired speakers. 

Recently approved 
technology. In June 
of 1989, the Feiti'rn! 
Comitnmications Com- 
mission allocated a 
band of radio frequen- 
cies stretching from 902 
to 92S MHz for wireless, 
in-home product ap- 
plications. Recoton, one 
of the ^vorld's leading wireless speaker man- 
ufacturers, t«ik advantage of the FCC ruling 
by creating and introducing a new speaker 
system that utilizes the recently approved fre- 
quency band to transmit clearer, stronger 
stereo signals throughout your home. 



1 50 foot range through walls! 

Recolon gives you Itie freedom lo lis- 
ten to music wherever you wanl. Your 
music is no longer limited lo Ihe roorr your 
stereo is in. With Ihe wireless headphones 
you can listen lo your TV. stereo or CD 
player while you move freely between 
rooms, exercise or do other activities. And 
unlike infrared headphones, you don'l have 
to be in a line-of-sighl with the transmit- 
ter, giving you a full f 50 foot range. 

The headphones and speakers have 
their own built-in receiver, so no wires are 
needed tjetween you and your stereo. One 
transmitter operates an unlimited number 
of speakers and headphones. 






,f^ 



Recohn 's imu^jtiiltirr ^-jitis mii^' through uylts 
Id 'u^irdess speah^rn oivra 75JXX1 sijtmre fivt area. 



Crisp sound throughout your 
home. Just imagine being able to 
listen to your stereo, TV, VCR or CD 
player in any room of your home with- 
out having to run miles of speaker wire. 
Plus, you'll never have to worry about range 
because the new 900 Mf-lz technology allows 
stereo signals to travel 
over distances of 150 feet 
or more through walls, 
ceilings and floors with- 
out losing sound quality. 
One transmitter, un- 
limited receivers. The 
powerful transmitter 
plugs into a headphone, 
audio-out or tape-out jack 
on your stereo or TV com- 
ponent, transmitting mu- 
sic wirelessly to your 
speakers or headphones. 
The speakers plug into an 
outlet. The one transmit- 
ter can broadcast to an un- 
limited number of stereo 
speakers and headphones. 
And since each speaker 
contains its own built in 
receiver/amplifier, there 
are no wires ninning from 
the stereo to the speakers. 
Full dynamic range. 
The speaker, mounted in 
a bookshelf-sized acoustically constructed cab- 
inet, provides a two-way bass reflex design 
for individual bass boost control. Full dynamic 
range is achieved by the use of a 2" tweeter 
and 4" woofer. Plus, automatic digital lock-in 



ni5~^ 



# A 



AWARD WINNING WIRELESS SPEAKER 



BtiiU-iii rcccilvr Vifttwif I'lmk'r 
ami iimfilifiir; \ '— 



Tuning 




4" wixt^y 



Cftmtui switch and 

— iitJifiJuai htM hx*^ 

wntrpt ion hack) 



use of wirr^. 



i:k ffX X 6-W X 5.5-L 
pf.fi*-ffi'rV talhr 50 dB 
■r,;--;-,^- :, 30dB 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■', -. .,'iM\.II 

i."- , ■■.jfr-. ! .".'.IS ilmi^ 
50 Hz- 15 KHz 



Don^t take our word for it. Try t yourseif. 
We're so sure you'll love the new award-winning 
Recolon wireless speaker system Ihal we offer 
you the Dare to Compare Speaker Cfiallenge. 
Compare Recoton's rich sound quality to that of 
any S200 wired speaker. If you're not completely 
convinced that these wireless speakers offer the 

same outstanding 

sound quality as wired 
speakers, simply return 
them within 90 days for 
a full *No Questions 
Asked' refund. 

Recolon'^ Oc.'-i'j;" and 
CfJxiMCiT»f_y Award 





Breakthtoiigit wireli'Sf sptiilar design 
Mnnkcti your home wilh music. 



tuning guarantees optimum reception and 
eliminates drift. The nev^■ technology provides 
static-free, interference-free sound in virtual- 
ly any en\'ironment. These speakers are also 
self-amplified; they can't bo blown out no niat- 
ter u'hat your stereo's wattage. 

Stereo or hi-fi, you decide. These speak- 
ers have the option of either stereo or hi-fi 
sound. You can use two speakers, one set on 
right channel and the other on left, for full 
stereo separation. Or, if you just want an ex- 
tra speaker in another room, set it on mono and 
listen to both channels 
on one speaker. Mono 
combines both left and 
right channels for hi-fi 
sound. Tills option lets 
you put a pair of speak- 
ers in the den and get 
full stereo separation or 
put one speaker in the 
kitchen and get com- 
plete hi-fi sound. 
Factory direct savings. Because of our com- 
mitnient to quality and our factory direct pric- 
ing, we sell more wireless speakers than 
anyone! For this reason, you can get these 
speakers far boloiv retail with our 90 day "Dare 
to Comimrc" money-back guarantee and full 
manufacturer's warranty. Through tiiis limit- 
ed time offer, the Recoton transmitter is only 
S69. It will operate an unlimited number of 
wireless speakers priced at only SS9 and wire- 
less headphones at S59 each. So take advan- 
tage of this special offer to fill your home with 
music. Your order will be processed in 72 hours. 

Recoton Transmitter S69 S4 siH 

wireless products compatible with the Recoton transmitter: 

Recoton Wireless Speaker S89 S6 saK 

Recoton Wireless Headphones S59 S4 s&h 

I'lease muiitiim protui>tit)iial codc161-CU1111. 
For fastest service call toll-free 24 hours a day 

800-992-2966 

L4IMH ^^9!^ IjSehiE^ 



These ii':rf/i\ss stcrw 
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To order by ninil send ch*^ck or money order for Ihe lolal 
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Or charge It lo your crfdil card by enclosing vour ^iccount 
number .itid cxp. date. Send to: 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive Suite 106 
Midlottiian, Virginia 23113 



ADMIkllSKMKNT 



TECHNOLOGY UPDATE 



How to get surround 
sound without buying 
the theater. . . 

An amazing neio surround sound decoder turns your 
existing stereo into a five channel home theater. 



B]/ Chuck Anton 

As much as I love renting videos, it's just 
not the snme as seeing a movie in a 
' theater. 1 remember the first time I saw 
Top Gun. I nearly jumped out of my seat.vvhen 
the planes flew o\-erhead. One of the reasons 
moi'ies seem so real is because they use sur- 
round sound to make it seem like you're ac- 
tuall\' there. Now, an 
incredible new de\'ice 
lets you use your 
stereo receiver to get 
that same surround 
sound in your honie. 

It takes more than 
just four speakers to 
get surround sound. 
You need to have 
some way of separat- 
ing the signals. The 
new QD-l Scries II de- 
coder does just that, 
and in a revolutionary 
way that rivals the 
best Dolby Pro-Logic 
and THX Systems 
available. 

Wins over critics. 
Noted audio critic, 
Len Feldman, re\'ievv- 
cd the QD-l for the 
September issue of 
Audio Ma^^aziue. He 
concluded that 
"...the QD-l pro- 
duced a completely 
accurate and realis- 
tic surround sound 
experience from a wi- 
riety of videotapes 
and laser discs with Dolby surround en- 
coding... the QD-i delivers home theater sound 
the way it was meant to be heard." 



The Secret of Surround Sound 

Surround sound has become the rage of Ihe 
■go's because il adds "depth" to stereo sound, 
giving you the home Ihealer experience. Simply 
stated, It makes you feel like you're actually at a 
cancer! or a movie theater. 

To 'iill a room" witti sound you need more 
than the too channels. And that's the beauty of 
the Dynaco OD-i , it provides five channels from 
any two channel stereo or TV. 

Dynaco Offers rear channel speakers specif- 
ically designed to integrate with the Qd-i de- 
coder. You may also need our center channel 
speaker, the Ato-v, if your two front speakers are 
more than eight feet apart. Adding this fifth 
speaker, or center channel , helps keep dialogue 
and important localization cues centered. So you 
don't need to spend thousands 
of dollars to enjoy sur- 
round sound. 




Breakthrough 'L minus R.' 

13<ick in the 1960's, Dynaco dis- 
covered that in addition to the 
right and left channels, a "dif- 
ference" signal existed in a 
stereo recording, and aptly 
named it "L minus R," The QD-l is able to de- 
code Dolby Surround 
signals in a videotape 
or a laser disc because 
those spatial and 
depth cues have been 
matrixed into the "L 
minus R" portion of 
the stereo soundtrack. 
It does so passively, 
with no signal pro- 
cessing. What's more 
ama/.ing, the QD-l us- 
es your main stereo 
amp to amplify the 
rear channels.- You do 
not need any addi- 
tional amplifiers! 
Concert hail sound. 
The QI>1 also dectxies 
the ambience found in 
all inusical record- 
ings. This sense of 
space, or concert 
hall acoustics is pre- 
sent in all CDs and 
cassettes, especially 
live recordings. John 
Sunier of Aiidiophilc 
Edition, a nationally 
syndicated radio pro- 
gram, says "If you're 







Submerge 
yaursetf in ricti 
surround sound 



a surround sound 
buff who loves to listen to music, you'll find 
this S79 passi\'e black box superior to even the 
S3000 THX or Dolby Pro-Logic processor." 



THE PASSIVE ADVANTAGE 



■ Passive, The QD-1 is passive, meaning it 
requires no AC current. It actually sounds 
better than active decoders, producing more clar- 
ity, more detail, no noise, a greater .^^.^^^jf^j 
sense of space, and zero _^_^^Mm'f'' 
distortion. This superior 
passive system is a break- 
through unique to Dynaco. 



The OD-1 decoder mskes your 
movies cotrte IQ fife. Surround 
sound brings the theater experi- 
enrx home to you. 




Active. All Doiby Pro-Logic decoders 
(stand-alone or built-in units) are active. 
This means they decode and amplify the 
signal electronically. The active way 
induces noise and distortion, hindering 
the home theater experience, 
This is an example where 
"more is less." Spending 
thousands on an active sys- 
tem will not give you the 
pefformance of the QD-t. 



Quick and easy installation. Hook up is 
easy. The QD-l connects to the speaker out- 
puts on your amp. The sf)eaker leads then run 
to each of your four (or fi\'e) speakers. The 
rear channel speakers may be small; we 
recommend the 
AW-ts at S99 a 
pair. They come 
with mounting 
hardu'are, a key- 
hole slot for flush 
mounting, and 
have an attrac- 
tive all-weather _ „., ^ 

The AW-1 rear channel speakers 
gun metal alu- imegrateperfectfy with the QD-i. 
minum finish- 
Factory direct offer. The QD-l is so new 
you won't find it at your local department 
store, To introduce this product, we are offer- 
ing it direct to you for a limited time special 
offer. By ordering now, you can save a sub- 
stantial amount of money. 
Risk-free home trial. Let's face it. The best 
way to evaluate surround sound is in your 
home, not in a showroom. That's why we're 
offering this risk-free home trial offer. 

We're so sure you'll be delighted with the 
quality of these products and the surround 
sound experience that we are giving you 30 
days to try them for yourself. If they're not ev- 
erything we say, return thom for a full refund. 

OD-1 surround sound decoder S79 S6 S&H 

Sliaih'r.< designed h/ Dynaco far Ike QD-I; 

AW-1 tivo rear charvnel speakers $99 S6 S&H 

A-10V shielded center speaker $59 S4 S&H 

To receive this special pricing you must 
mcntinn promotional code CHI 1 1(1. 
For fastest service call toll-free 24 hours a day 

800-992-2966 

To iirJer by mail send check nr money order fiir [he 
lol.il .nmiiunt includinj; S&H (VA ru.sidonls .idd 4.5% 
ftdlcs tiix.) Or just cli^Trj^r il to vinir cri'dit card, enclos- 
ing your accuLint lUinibcr .nul CNp. tl.itc. Sond tci: 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive Suite 106 
Midlothian, Virginia 23113 




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programs. BBS's, editors, documentation, 

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update in May 1993 $24.95* 

CDROM Caddies S4.95 

' Shareware programs require separate 
payment to authors \i founid useful, 

cV*^, AMEX/VISA/MC/COD 

"fO^ 1-800-786-9907 
FAX 1-510-674-0821 
info@cdrom.com 

S5 SS.H per order (in USA, Canada and tvlexico) 
$1 overseas 1 -51 0-B74-07B3 

All our disks 

are unconditionally 
guaranteed. 








^^VV^ 



^: 



Walnut Creek CDROM 

4041 Pike Lane, Suite D 
Concord, CA 94520 



Circle Reader Service r4umber 171 



Circle Reader Service Number 189 




HOLLYWOOD is a world unto itself . , . , 

The gliimour. the glitter, the pathos and ihe 

inigedy ihat often accompanies ihe stars 

and the players^lle people yoti see on 

the screen and those unkirown faces. 

hidden behind the cameras eye. The 

faces that are familiar to millions of 

ino\'iej.!oei's the world over-anrl the 

fLices that elude fame for their eniiit 

lives-and those who kwv a passins^ 

acquaintanceship with stardom - and 

then disappear from public sight. 

LEARN AU ABOUT HOLLY«'OOD'S 

LEGENDS and see them as never before. See the 

photographs that made ihem famous. .Many from the private collections of 

Hollywood's photographers, fictiu'es yoii'\'e ne\'er .seen before. 

Read from THE HOLLYWOOD DEATH BOOK by James Roben Parish, one 
of HolhAvood's foremost aLiilionties and chroniclers of the Hollywood scene. 
Learn alxxit more than 5,000 Hollywood players and feast on biographies oi' 
hundreds of your favorite performers. 

Just $69.95 

p£ S5.00 MH S to itKrs atpicaUe) 
Order From DepLCPT 

ScanRoh Publications 

Box 72* CedarhuTst, NY 11516 

or Call 800-269-2237 

Fax 516-295-2240 

Visa & MasterCard Accepted 



Listen to Marilyn .Monroe singing "Happy 

Binhday .Mr. President," hear James Dean and 

Xatalie \viK)d and more of your fa\'oriles as thc\' 

perform ju.si for yotir listening pleasure on this 

disc which features more dian 60 mintites of 

the voices of some of Hollywood's 

most legendar}' figures! 




Circle Reader Service Number 162 



Start your own Vinyl Sign 
iVIaldng Business for as 
iittle as '2995 

• In-store or mobile 

locations 

• No Experience 

• Glass etching and 
Metal engraving 
equipment also 
available 

• Start part-time from 
home 



CALL TODAY! 
1-214-248-9100 
D & K Enterprises, Inc. 

3216 Commander, Suile 101, Oept27 
Carrollton, Texas 75006 




CaitoonMania is an easy to use software that lets you design 
and write your own cartoons. It contains a gallery of over 200 
pieces of clip ait from which you can choose sceneries, props and 
characters. The special graphics feature of CaitoonMania enables 
the 16 characters to change facial expression and body posture. To 
add a dimensionai look to your scene, arrange and re-size the 
characters and props. Finish off yotu- piece of worlc by writing your 
own dialog ue. T his program allows you to print your art work or 
save it as a TIFF, BMP or PCX file. 

CaitoonMania offers an endless source of entertainment by 
stimulating the creative side of both children and adults. Younger 
kids get a kick out of arranging and coloring their art work, making 
their own story or coloring book. Teenagers and adulLs wilt enjoy 
designing unique letters, greetings, invitations and posters. 



See your local retailer or call (904) 483-2934 |^ 



0b. 



Save $ 1 5 Buy direct for only $34.95. (List Price $49.95) 

Pius $3.50 for shipping/handling PL resident add $2.30 sales tax 

Send check/money order to; V^ n fl 12505 Pine Glen Drive, 

wSmmaiOU Leesburg, FL 34788 
30 Day Money Back Guamntee 

Requires z PC with DOS 3.0 or higher. VGA ot EGA momlor, aad a hard disk. 



MAC-IN-DOS 



Software breakthrough 

lets PCs read, write, 

and format Macintosh 

high-density disl<ettes. 



DOS 




Can 1-800-628-3475 today. 



Pacific Micro 



111 Siiii \iitririiip Cirilf. t'251). Mciunlain S im. C V 'M(I41» 




Circle Reader Service Number 160 



Gircie Reader Service Number 156 



J^^y ^ Medley just went GOLD! 




Sound Board 

TRUE leBIT STEREO SOUND 

MIDI INTERFACE AND 4: 1 COMPRESSION 
SAMPLING RATE OF UP TO 44. 1 IN 
PLAYBACK AND RECORING MODES. 



CD-ROM 

DISK CAPACITY: 
DATA TRANSFER: 
ACCESS TIME: 
MEMORY BUFFER: 



635MB -uocti- 
300kb/sec.-udcc; 

320ms 
64Kb 



2 AMPLIFIED STEREO SPEAKERS 

INCLUDE ONE CD-TITLE BUNDLE 



Lotus i <ij ™ IvIulti media 
Smart Help! 
PususH-rr 2.0. lax) ojpart. 
International business 

6t ECONOMICS. 

COHPLErsAlJLTn«aEDL'. 




The 7th Guest. 
Wing Comm./ultima vi. 
Mario is Missing. 
Sherlock holmes. 
Detective. 

CO IfCFLETl^KJLni .€ED U. 



I BpUCATIONAy 

TOOLW'jn«,i iviULJiMEDIA 

encyclopedia. 
The San Diego Animals. 
Refernce Library. 
World Atlas a US Atlas. 




^i 



MICKO 



VtH 



800-874-2355 

IN Caufornia a I^^^ERNATlONAL Dial 7 1 4/B30-2355 "° suhch««e 

E4 HOUR FAX 7 1 4/830-37 1 2 



MORE CD TlTLEIS... 
AMERICAN BUSINESS PHONE BOOK. $18 

APOLLO SPACE SERIES $18 

AIRCRAFT ENCYCLOPEDIA $18 

CAREER opportunities $18 

CD GAME PACK II $18 

CIA FACT book $18 

COREL DRAW 4.0 UPGRADE $149 

CHESSMASTER 3O0O $22 

FRESH ARTS $22 

GREAT CITIES MULTIMEDIA $22 

INTERACTIVE STORYTIME $22 

loom $ZZ 

MONKEY ISLAND.. $22 

MAGAZINE RACK $22 

MAVIS TYPING MULTIMEDIA $22 

NATIONAL PARKS GUIDE $22 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS GUIDE $22 

POWER TOOLS FOR WINDOWS $16 

Oft A 4.0 $43 

SECRET WEAPON $22 

TIMETABLE SCIENCE Be TECH $22 

US ATLAS WITH AUTOMAP $23 

ABOVE TTT1_ES OFFCnED AT TVIESC DISCOUHTED 
PRICES ONL.Y WHEN PURCHASED WITH THE 
MCDE-ET MUI_Ti»4EDiA KIT. 



HEPLCy * MEDLEy PLUS ABE TfUCEMARKS OF CELL MJCRO ALL TH*DF:m*HKS ARE OF TWEIR RESPECTIVE COMP*NEES. 



Circle Reader Service Number 118 



SOFTWARE BLOWOUT! 



Lotus Works 1.0 --$8.00 

PFS Window Works 1.0 - $12.00 

Spinnaker 8nl - $10.00 

Prodigy Starter Kits - $5.00 

Megafortress Mega-Pak - $20.00 

MS-Windows 3.0 - $8.00 

450 Truetype Font Pak - $24.00 

DR-DOS 5.0 -$4.00/ 6.0 -$15.00 

GroUier's MFC Encyclopedia CD-ROM 

^JD. OU (OEM Version) 

Mammals or Animals CD-ROM 

^20. 00 (OEM Versions) 

Quantities Very Limited - Act Fast! 



Get your kids ttie 
New MATH game! 

MATH 

Bat with t fetal! price of anly ^29.9S it 
won't ittirii 9 hola in your poeketboold 





Each of the five levels have new 
and exciting castle> lo explore. 




Match the etiuations wHIi 
dodKing the fireballs in 
dazzling arcade style gami 



Call (713)-277-1717 

Fax Inquires (713)-277-3525 

AJl Orden Shipped COD. AIJ Pricing Subjccl To Ctiemgt Wrlhout Noli«. Ml Pricing 
Limiled To Imenloir Od Hand ONLY! S2S.00 MijiJmuni Order Pltaic. i2SM NSFFm. 
Pricing Reflecli Caih Diicounl. Orcr 250 Item* In Sloct -- Call For Cotuplcie Ijiring Of 
Our current ImsDlorj. Open M-F, 10 AM T116 PM.CST, 



♦ * 



We Buy Software - Fax Us Your List 



+ * 



Attention Kids 

Face the nerce Dr^E^n, Scorch 
Create your own Itloat 



Attention Parents 




Helps kids improve addition, sabtradjoiijl 

. niiiMplication, and division skills 

Track hiffli scores fur comparing" Separate eciuation arid dexleritj- conirols 
witli trii-ml- allow kids of all abilities to enjoy the game 

Exiierieiicf 2,9^ lubr animations • Provides positive reintorcetnen! 

■ ' ■ ' "" ; by liindraark 




7947 ;inrt 



Circle Reader Service Number t76 



FREE 486 Computer 
Color Monitor, Printer 

You can earn $2,000 to $10,000 per month 
from your kitchen table providing needed ser- 
vices for your community. Computer Business 
Services needs individuals to run a computer 
from their home. If you purchase our .sofrware, 
we will give you a FREE 486 compurer, VGA 
color monitor, 80 meg hard drive and a print- 
er. If you already have a computer, we will give 
you a discount. The industrial revolution is 
over hut the service revolution is just starting. 
Rather than setting up offices all over the 
i?iJi7T7 U.S., we are showing individuals and couples 

tRtt CBS1486 SXComimtcr y^ow to provide our services and letting every- 
one involved in this service revolution reap the benefits. Our way of training our 
new service providers and their success rate is the talk of the computer industry. 
Call or write for a free 3 hour cassette tape and color literature and find out how 
easy it can he for you to earn money in your spare rime and help your communi- 
ty. Begin part-time and still retain the security of your present position. 

Call toll-free: 

1^800-343^8014, ext. 303 

(in Indiana 317-758-4415) Fax to: (317) 758-5827 Or Write: 
Computer Business Services, Inc., CBSl Plaza, Ste. 303, Sheridan, IN 46069 





This extraordinary program 
provides a sense of "security" 

by providing a complete 

identification of a child should an 

emergency occur. 

• A Business You Can Be Proud Of 

• Full or Part Time 

• Continued Dealer Support 

• Turnkey Package -Computer, 
printer, software, ID' system supplies 
and training just S6995.00 



CALL TODAY for 
INFORMATION 



214-248-9100 

3216 (ommander Dr. 
Suite lot • Oept 27 
Corrollton, TX 75006 



IliMlt 11. ftlltn 



Kitti 



12/15/« 



nuitm 



Bro Bro Cii 4!lb 



lati i Niria Mien 
IZ3 lUln Street 
blls, n TS5S 

r2nrssi-i2ii 



None 



_^ 'JWiiinil.^ 



THE AMERICAN HEART 

ASSGTIATION 
MEMORIAL PROGRAMS 



^American Heart Association 

This space proi/ided as a public service. 



Trick Your Kid Into Leaniino Math! 



Adventure LearningWare™ 
Treasure Hunt Math™ 

Trcuure Hunt Math is t good cxumple of bow cctucntknal 
kAwstc on be dowTuight fun for \ddA. — Shincwaic M*^Bjine, 

This ii t grcAt ^taat, my 6-ycti old cia oiultipty, level 2; my 
9-year old wli KKJaUy lit woi do frictkur —J. StevnuoD, MD. 

Includes MathTris™. the addictive, 
^o Ming-blocks style malh game! 

Feifect for your Idd; makes a tbou^tfut gifl too. 

^NoD-stop action g^me featuring colorful^ 
■fiitmtjtrf gnphic:] and »»ial pmcnts 
elefoeatizy math for gr»i^ 1 throu^ 6. 
^1^ *Ovcr lOOOnuOh&ctscovennsadditioa, 
aubtnctiDc, multipUcatiDii, divuiou, 
decimiilfl uidpcrcenu. 
*Fcadurc9 record lucpin^ math problem 
editor, high score list and printing of 
<y certiBcatea of BchicvcmcnL 

*Scbool lab pack? & site liccnsa available. 
Requires IBMV PC or cocnpadble with EGA or VGA giapbics. 

S^iH($^ 3UU. iM prifXL Onir 519,95 + $2.95 poitagc 

(CalifonuA rcsidenti add S 1.63 Bala tax) 
omcrwimVuil/MC: (800)829-5519, 7 dayi a wetk. 

Fax (408) 224-M55. Inquiries (408) 224-55 1 9, 
Or, send check or moiicy onfcr lo. Achcnlurc Lcamingl^^ 
5^7 Sncll Ave. #2J6 ■ San JoSe, CA 95123 



Oir.10 [lay ninncy back nujirimtc* 
Vuur crmmli-tc sulLstuctiun ur viiui- iiKirn 




Learn 
Computers! 

Home study. 
Learn the per- 
sonal compu- 
ter for a better 
career and an 
easier liome 
life. Exciting, 
easy to follow. 
Free booklet. 

CALL800223-4542 

The School OF 
Computer Training 

6065 Roscwcll Road 
I Dcpi. KM6S(X12. Atlanta. GA 30328 ■ 

Circle Reader Servfcc Number 183 




.^^ SIGNS AND 
W RUB66R STAMPS 

'■(5*^ for your ooin use or q 
profitable sideline business 



Self-Inking and traditional 

knob handle stamps can 

be made for less tnan $1. 

Retail prices will start in 

the $10+ range. 




Informational signs, nameplates, 

control panels, name badges, 

and hundreds of other signage 

items can be made for pennies 

per square inch. 




JdCKSON MflRKINf] PROMJCTS CO., INC 

Brownsville Rd., D-200, Mt. Vernon, IL 62964 
PKone: 800-851-4945 Fax; 618-242-7732 



Circle Reader Service Number 231 

p— — — — — — n 

I Be a computer 

repair expert! 



Professional-level home 
study teaches you PC re- 
pairs, troubleshooting, 
upgrading, instalfation, 

I and servicing. 
Increase your value as 
Ian employee or open your 
own business. No high- 
tech knowledge, no e-t- 
I pensive instruments. 
Free career literature. 

, 800-223-4542 




. Age_ 



. Plume! L 



Clly_ 



. Zip- 



I 

I The School of PC Repair 

■ 606.^ Ro^icwcU Roud 

I Dcpt. JM68002. Atlanta, GA 30328 

Circle Reader Service Number 111 



Mme MoMif J Jkn A CoMmn 



With Best Personalized Bcxjks own a lifetime license for a patented 
product that wiil please adults, delight and educate children, and return high 
profits on a minimal investment. 
That's the sure-fire success formula 
that Best Penionalized Bcwks offers to 
distributors who are building strong, 
easy to run, highly profitable businesses. 

As the leader in the industiy Best 
Personaliied Books has exclusi\'e 
licensing agreements from Mattel Toys 
Inc. for Barbie™, from Warner Bros, 
for Bugs Bunny™ and The Lxxiney 
Tunes™ and from the National Football 
League (N.F.L.™). 

Best Personafeed Books become instant 
favotites because the child 
is the star of each story and 



appeal to a wide range of ages and tastes, and includes well-written stories on 
rellgiousand ethnic themes that leinforce family values. 

No computer experience is necessary to 

My IdBi^'"^ ^^""^'^v^?^ create Best Personiili:cd Bcx)ks. A compre- 

^Baby Book .|^^ ■-V,''' Iw -* hensive ttaining manual shows you how to 

^^ » personable a bcnik in just minutes. And 

fvihi^, f S^^ -'^ *'f^ ^^'■'^ strong marketing program, you'll 
find selling options ate limitless. You can 
wotk at home, on location at malls, craft 
fairs, flea markets, home patties, or in 
conjunction with local businesses or fiind- 
raising groups. 
Strong dealer support is a priority, as is dte 

r commitment to helpinfj; you make even bigger 
, profits with other popular personaliied products 
including clocks, audio cassette 
tapes, birth announcements, 
calendars and stationery for 
teens and adults. 




For just $1495 start your own hishly profitable business 
creatins personalized children's books with a computer. 



friends and relatives join 
in on ever)' adventure. An 
extensive array of titles 

Best PtrsoMliitd Books Inc 

475 Best Personallxed Plaza • 4350 Sigma Drive • Dallas, Texas 75944 Call or wi^te for free sample book and infonnatioa kH 

Best Personalized Books holds US patent 5213461 to produce personalized bixiks. Barbie™, Bugs Bunny™, The Looney Tunes™, the N.F.L.™ and associated 
tiadematks are owned and used under exclusive licenses from Mattel Toys, inc., Warner Bitjs. and the National Football League. 



(S14) 38S-3aM 




1/enif'9i^Pv>{it 



With our process and a computer you can instantly produce the highest 

quality personalized children's books and stationery on the market 

today. 

All books are hardbound with full color illustrations and laser quality 

printing. Ideally suited for liome based business, malls, department 

stores, fairs or mail order. 

Very simple to operate and highly profitable. 

Only a limited number of dealerships available. 



For a complete information packet call today. 

D&K ENTERPRISES, IHC. • 3216 COMMANDER DRIVE 
SUITE 101 • DEPT 27 • CARROUTON, TEXAS 75006 



Notebook computers 
are great — except 
when it comes to playing 
simulation and action 
games. That's because they 
don't come equipped \vith a 
game port. ►introducing the 
Parallel Game Port'" from 
Genovation. The PGP turns 
your notebook 
into a game- 
book by con- 
verting the 
computers prinrer 

i port into a "virtual 

I game port". Wirh 

i PGP, you also get 

- a gender changer 

% adapter, which lets 

■' you connea a joy- 



STICK IT 
TO YOUR 

NOTEBOOK. 





stick, yoke, peckils or even 
a weapon sytcms con- 
troller to your notebook 
or desktop DOS PC. 
'ITic PGP is an indispens- 
able aoassoty for today's serious 
giimcr Wlitther you race a 
Gir, fly combat, maneuver a 
tank, or wing along at 
100 knots, the 
PGP's software 
features will 
enhance your 
play action. Look for 
the Parallel Game 
Port in tlie software 
section of your 
nearest computer 
dealer. Or call us at 
{800)8224333. 



t*.24c:.jU. 



CENOVATIONi 



Genovaiion, inc. ▼ 17741 Mirctiell Nonh ▼ In'inc. CA 92714 
(714) 833-3355 t FAX (714) 83.1-0322 t Salts: (800) 822-4333 



Circle Reader Service Number 22B 



Where Adults 
Come To Play! 



The Choice For HOT MODEM FUN! 

' HOT CHAT Live W/Thou sands of Ladies 
& Genls in Groups & Privatel 

■ Tons Of Sizzling Hot Message Areas, 
Shareware Files and Adult GIFsl 

. Matchmaker With -DATING-BASEI 
" StraJghl and Gay Sections I 

■ Live Competitive Tournament Gaming! 

■ Unlimited Connect With One Low Pricel 
" Local Numbers In Over 800 Cities! 

• Plus Much Much More! 

Now With Our 
Exclusive FANTASY 
Arsa! 





Modem Sigotip Of Atoa Wo Cslt 

818-358-6968 



Circle Reader Service Number 141 



FREE! 

Download the HOTTEST & SEXIEST Images 
from our ADULT On-Line Magazine - FREE! 

JlMCC is an Adult On-Llna Magazine that 
offers you: 

ORIGINAL Adult GIF images not 
available on any other BBSl 

• GORGEOUS, Sexy & Exotic Models 
botfi Amateur and Professional I 

• QUALITY Adult GIF Images and VGA 
Movies produced by professionals ! 

• HIGH SPEED access available on 
ALL lines (14.4k down to 1200 baud). 

Set your Modem to e-N-1 and your 
terminal to ANSI Graphics and dial: 

(818) 709 - 4275 

OuaiUoniT Call our vote* llm il (SIB) 708-3795, 

the on«line adult magazine 

Musi be I a YiiAis ol Ago Of CHdar > Limited Otfer 

I'm Chriity, tli« S^fiftmi Admin- 
iitrifor and pirt fime Glamoar 
Model on UCE. Come & tee my 
imiges & yjtit tfifh me On-line. 

Circle Reader Senrlce Number 178 




un 




Home Entertainment 
Organizer 

Computerize your Video, Audio, and 
Book Libraries with tills advanced 
database software for IBM. Search hy 
multiple criteria. Instantly change sort 
order. Then print personalized labels or 
reports with a keystrolte. Indispensable 
for the serious video or audiophile. 

Now only $49.95 

+ $3. S&H. 

30 Day FREE TRIAL 

Pay only afler you test drive HEO on your 
own computer, or return it Tor full credit. 

To order call 
1-800-238-2154 anvtime. 



circle Reader Service Number 145 



T-5hirts 
The Ultimate Soft-Wear! 

Many sayings, pictures, colors... 

• I've got the Computer Blues 

• The more people I meet, the more 
I like my computer 

• Upgrade Challenged! 

• I fought the LAN, & the LAN won! 

• Don't Panic! • When all else 
faiis, read the manual ... 

Star Trek and SF t-shirts also. 

For more information please coniact: 
HYPERUGHT ENTERPRISES 

1208 Duthie Avenue, 
Bumaby, BC Canada V5A 2R4 
T: (604) 420-1479 F: (604) 420-3891 
Wholesale Inquiries Welcome 



Circle Reader Service Number 129 



25XX)0 SHAREWARE 

PROGRAMS $ 



ON 4 CD-ROMs 2«ti 

lA TEST '93 EOmON ■ for $ 1 50 
30 DA Y MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

Uofv piogiams Ihsn ever bct^rc!^' Windows Applications 
Games Programming Tools... DataBase Acccsso- 
iies.. Educational Aids... DeskTop Publistiing . even 
OS;i. . Word Processors.,. Utilities for Printers. Files, 
Keyboard Screen, Clipart, Spreadstieets.. Communica- 
ticns. , Photograptis ., CAO... Wusie... in shoi ■ pro. 

Siams ht anv application voir can imagine^ 
niquc LISTER PROGRAki allaws you to easily access ANY 
PRbGRAM, IN ANY CATEGORY, iniusi setofids- load il 
onto your t^D, and wllcnyaii'te rmistied, either keep it on the HD. 
01 do ttie housekeeping to keep yeui ttO unclutttirod ttAh pra- 
Qiams ya\i may use only inficqrjently. 
OVER t GIGABYTES ■ 25,000 PROGRAMS -THE BEST 
SHAREWARE AND HOST VALUABLE DATA YOUIL EVER 
FINOII SOCLUBS rDJo/n,„(io oiO(if*Vdoi¥nlojrfinB/tts... ft's 
ilithfr9fotvoui(it!y.^iocompirt...totxpenmeniwithlALi 
ii/tiUbIt mlhm ncondslll YOU CANT FIND A WIDER 
SELECTION ■ OR A LOWER COST PER PROGRAM 
ANYWHERE ELSE! LATEST '93 EDITION 
ORDER YOURS TODAY RUSH $89 t $s S/H, 
CASH, CHECK, MONEY ORDER! COD> OK! 

DEALERS WANTED 

CROSLEY SOFTWARE 
BOX 276, ALBURG, VT 05440 

Fax: (514) 345-8303 Tel: (514) 739-9328 



ANICA • IBH • HAC • WINDOWS 



you fire Jnuited 

to sample the luorld's finest 

selection of leading software, 

Presented by the u'orid's largest 

distributor of shareii'are. 

Call for intbnnation, 



^y^M 



Software of the Month Club® 

5816 DRYDEN PUCE • CARiJBAD, CA WOOB 



PH:619«93T«811, EXT. 509 
FAX:619«929-1163 



circle Reader Service Number 142 




Circle Header Service Number 173 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



COLORS: SLACK, RED, BLUE, GREEN, BflOWN, PURPLE, YELLOW 



Rlbboni Prics/Each Blacli Color 

Brother 11 09 SS.50 $6.50 

Citizen GSX14Q.4-CLR $4.00 $12.50 

Epson MX-80 $3.25 S5.00 

Epson 3250 SS.50 SID.OO 

Okidata 182/192 S5.00 $7.50 

Panasonic 1180/1124 $5,00 $7.50 

Panasonic KXP 21 23 4-CLR $5.50 $15.00 

Star NX1 000 4-CLR $3.50 $6.25 

Star NX1 020 4-CLR $8.00 S10.6O 

Star NX2420 4-CLR $6.00 $12.00 



T-shirt 
$7.50 

$15,00 
$6.75 



$20,00 
$10.00 
$15,00 
$15.00 



COLOR PAPER: 2ooshts/8rightpk.$io.90 

PASTEL PK. $7.90 BANNER PAPER 45 F. RL. $8.95 
CERTIFICATE PAPER: S9.95PK. 



CUSTOM T-SHJRT, DESIGN YOUR OWN 

• HEAT THANSER RIBBONS 

• TRANSFER PAPER 
FOR DOT MATRIX AND 
INKJET PRINTERS 

• HEAT TRANSFER LASER 
TONER 



c^ 



Min. Ordtn $25.00. Min. SiH S6.00. Prices subject to ehanael 



RAMCO COMPUTER SUPPLIES 

P,0, Box 475, Manteno, IL 800-522-6922orBl5-46B-8081 



Circle Header Service Number 226 



Circle Reader Service Number 136 



at bo PC Jet-3bdlfeys Want? 



Hair-Raising Sorties 

Death Defying Manj 

Heroics 

/ictory 

={ealism ^ 

40TAS™ 



NEW PRODUCT 




Easy to use sollware. on-line help, 
(jll sceen editor 

• Made in USA 

• 1 & 2 Year Warranty 

• Technical Support by phone 

• 30 day Money Back Guarantee 

• FREE software upgrades available via BBS 

• Demo SW via BBS (EM2DDEMD.EXE) IPB10DEIVI0.EXE) 

• E(e)proms 2716-8 megabit, 16 bit 27210-27240. 27C400 & 27C800. 

• Flash 28F256-28F020. (29C256-29COt0 {EMP-20 only)) 

■ Micros 874 1 A, 42A, '12AH. 48, 49. 48H, 49H, 55, B7C51 , B7C51 FX, 87C751 ,752 

• GAL, PLD from NS. Lattice, AVID-16V8, 20U8, 22Via 



ROFt lUIOFtE ■NFOFtlVIA.TIC^N CA.I_L 



NEEDHAM'S ELECTRONICS, INC. 

(916)924-8037 

BBS(916)972-8042 
C.O.D. FAX (916) 972-9960 



• . Introducing the First 
i' Adull Plioto CD 
Special Introductory 
Price of $129, 
^ saveS70 

':.;• See ex-Playboy 
f ■ Playmate, Teri 
•^■- Welgel.ln the first 
•% odull Photo-CD. Enjoy 
_,. ' ttiese live action 
'■ images, photograptied 
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Avg. cartridge can be re-inked 60-100 times. 

Universal cartridge model 79.95 

Epson Maclnker 49.95 

Multicolor Adapter (4-band ribbons) 40.00 

CSmpuler Frionds, Inc. 

WISONW Science PliAIirivc -Portland OR 97229 
To Order 1-B 1)0-547 -3303 Tel. (503) 626-2291 




Circle Reader Service Number 254 



Games Too Expensive ? 

Consider Pre-owned Software 



• Save big $$$ over new 

• Original disks and manuals 

• IBM - AMIGA - C64 

• Hard-to-find classics plus 
all the latest releases 

• Call or write for free catalog 
(specify computer) 



940 4th Ave «22 Huntington WV 25701 

1-800-638-1123 

Customer Service: 304-529-0461 
BBS for complete iiat: 304-529-7050 



2C€C iPeints 



Fantazia Fonts and Sounds 

Ouer 2000 CrueCvpe and Adobe 

Fonts on CD-ROm 

eundreds of VOC Piles 

Ificluded is a HUGE 102 page book 
with a sainple printout of all the fonts. 

For a limited time, you can get 

the Largest Collection of Fonts 

Available for an AMAZING 



1^800-^951^0877 



Fantazia Concepts, Inc. 
35143 Vine Street 
Eastiake, Ohio 44095 



Fax 
216-951-9241 



Circle Reader Service Number 134 



IBM PC, PCjr 
XT, AT, & 

Tandy users 



Not everyone needs the fastest 
computer money can buy. Run Lotus 
1-2-3, WordPerfect. dBase, and most 
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computer! We specialize in hardware 
products tliat allow older computers to 
run ttie latest software. 

Call for information and free catalog! 

You don't have to buy a new 

Computer to run the Latest 

Software! 



(800) 922-7257 



2400 Belmar Blvd. 

PC[iJiiia3ass|po8o.292 

Belmar, NJ 07719 



('nmpjflcr I'/jyraciv S/>i'iitllf\J.\ .SVj/LV J'J.\4 



Circle Reader Service Number 250 




Have FUN while 
learning with... 

]^e.Qac.y So|+vvai*e's 



MUTANOID MATH CHALLENGE 



^i»i+Kiiietic p>'aci'\c.ii 

Ovef 200 wcTi'd pcoLileims 

Critical tKinkinc; skills 



MUTANOID lA/ORD CHALLENGE 



Spelmi£)/vocQbi.tlt:\i*y practice 

65,000 wai'd on-disk dtctioiicii*v 

iHi'iticnl fKi>\kiiiq skills 

MS-DOS or Macintosh 

Ages 7 and up • $49.95 eacd 
Call for fREE demo disk 1-800-532-7692 



circle Reader Service Number 164 



CLASSIFIEDS 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



Wrn.L PAY YOU TO TYf'l-; NAMliS AMI 
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HOW TO MOONLIGHT WITH YOUR COMPUTER 

Free Int'ornmrion. Mii>! rending for 

everv'ojie wanting iheir own business. 

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CABLE TV 



CABLE TV 



CABLE TV DESCRAAfBLfnS 

Converters & Accessories 

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Ctrcfe Reader Service Number 359 



FREE CATALOG 



■ CABLE T.V. BOXES - ALL TYPES • 

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Circlo Reader Service Number 352 

• Jerrolij* • Oak 

• Zenith • Hannline 

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• Scientific Atlanta 

EXCELLENT PRICES! 

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CABLE TV 



CABLE TV CONVERTERS 

Why Pay A High Monthly Fee'' 
SaveSWO'sA Year 



• All Jerrold. Oak, Hamlin. Zenith. 
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• 30 Day Money 6acl( Guarantee 

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No Illinois Orders Accepted 

PuichiiseT dg>i*e^ lo comply v^ilh all m^u jnU 

It^eidl law^ legaroing piivaie owr^et^hip at caD R 

rv equ-pm^Til Consull local caEile operaloi 



L&L ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
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DesPlaines, IL 60016 

Free Catalog I ■80Chb42-943i> 
Inlormalion t-708-540i106 



Circle fleader Service Number 364 



Closing date for December classifieds 

is September 15. 

Call/Fax your ad (516) 757-9562 




3534 KEnnebec, Eagan, MN 55122 
30 DAY TRIAL ' 1 TR. WARRANTY 



VISA mC AMEX DISC COD 



Circle Reader Service Number 370 



7 



* * * * PRESENTING * * * -tt^ 

CABLE TV 
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***** STARRING ***** 

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• FINEST WARRANTY PROGRAM AVAILABLE 

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FOR FREE CATALOG, , >.. , . - en 17 

aBDERU iNFORMATION rOW- i't3-0'/ i I 



PACIFIC CABLE CO., INC. 

7325% Reseda Blvd., DepL 1115 

Reseda, CA 91335 



Circle Reader Service Number 354 



ORDER YOUR LIMITED-EDITION PENTHOUSE ONUNE 
9600 DATA/FAX MODEM TODAY AND SAVE! 



A CUSTOM, LIMITED EDITION PENTHOUSE 
ONLINE 9600 DATA/FAX MODEM FOR LESS THAN $170! 

Penthouse magazine has teamed up with U.S. Robotics to 
offer a top-grade 9600-bps data/fax modem for only $169 
(internal board) or S179 (external). These high-speed V.32- 
compatible modems feature V.42/MNP 2-4 error control. 
V.42bis/MNP 5 data compression, and throughput of up to 
38.4. The external model (shown) has a custom, limited- 
edition black case with the famous Penthouse Key symbol. 

Features include autodial and -answer, frequently called 
number storage, nonvolatile RAM (stores all modem 
settings), summary of current modem setting display 
speaker with volume control, onscreen call progress 
reporting, five-year parts and service warranty, an extensive 
owner's manual, and a quick-reference card. The internal 
modem comes on a 10-inch board that fits all IBM PC bus- 
compatible computers, and can be addressed on COM 
ports 1-4. 

Pius, you will also receive the BLAST® FAX PC™ fax 
software, which lets you send or receive faxes from your 
computer. Compatible with all G3 machines, BLAST® 




ORDER 

YOUR 

CUSTOM 

MODEM -^ 

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FAX PC™ allows transmission scheduling, hot-key faxing 
from within applications, background operation, and much, 
much more. 



Circle Reader Service Number 1(17 



CLASSIFIEDS 



CABLE TV 



COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 



CABLE TV 



t-9388. 



FREE CATALOG 

GUARANTEED BEST PIIICE5 ■ IMMEDIATE SHIPPING 

APPLE ELECTRONICS 

3389 Sheridan St. • Suite 257 
HallywDod. FL 33021 



Circle Reader Service Number 366 



LEARN C AND C++ 

Don't waste youf mne getting overwhelmed by 

1000 page hooks and manuals. Get a worl<ing 

knowledge of Structured Prograrnming, C. Object 

Oriented Design, and C++ quiclily and easily. 

Order your overview today' It's only S19 95 plus 

S2 55 s'h Serd check or m/o to 

GSP Technologies, P.O. Box 1341, 

Cambridge, MA 02142 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Circle Reader Service Number 350 



T-Shfrts— The Ultimate Soft-Wear! 

Many sayings. pjclurcE. colors. * When aU else 

fails, read ihe manual • I ve got ihe Compuler 
Blues • The more ceopio I meel. the more I like my 
compuler • Don I Panic' , and many more 
For more intormation please contact 
HYPERLEGHT ENTERPRISES 
1208 Du[hie Avenue. Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 2R4 
V/^olGsa'e l""Lr:;c?: ■A'eirn'rn 



Circle Reader Service Number 358 



CD-ROM 



SHAREWARE 

for IBM COMPATIBLE 
Same Price for 3.5" or 5.25" 
Shipping & Handling: S2/order 

VISA / MASTERCARD 



REGULAR ITEMS $1.2S 

F-PROTECT SUPERB Virus scanning/cleaning. 
SCANV106 McAftec'a Latest Virus acar^ner, 

W* WAlt •hip mo*T r*«ant vanlon niraiUbJ^I 
WO UF3D. Kl LOB UlST-RESC UE ROVER OVERKILL 
ANCIENTS-SOLAR WIND-IVIEGATRON MAHJONGG 
NEVERLOCK-IVIAJOR STRYKER-tiundrads moial 

BIG ITEMS $2 on DSHD only! 

lUIONSTERBASH Catacomb Abym GATE WORLD 
ZONEee (3B6 only) DARE to DREAMlWindovirtJ 
KENSLAB (38Bonlyl CASTLE of WINOfWir^dowiJ 

CD's AT AMAZING PRICES ! 

Stiarawfl7e Coiloctjons 
JUST GAMES i^h Houaa of Oamat 920 

SWirulWABE 1993 «26 We'll find rjhat you neadt 

Adultl ONLY 
NICHTWATCH tinleractiue Enleilalnment!! S52 
BUSTY BABES II or III S30 

STORr.ll Hi or III) 537 BANGKOK S49 

Sr^UTWARESZB MANPOWER S31 

VOLCANO 960 ALL BEAUTIES S29 

We have over 60 Adult titles Available! 

ComPro Software 

P.O. BOX 4426 

Star City, WV 26504 

1-800-PC-DISCS 

Circle Reader Service Number 356 



COMPUTER KITS 



K-BLILU COMI'tTlLK KITS. THE RECOGNIZED LE.ADi-K 
in buiid-ii-yoursclf \K\. Ret'd by PC-Upgrade 
and Pop. Sciiiicc. Used in schoc>l!. and iraminj 
prtjgrani^ iijliunwide. Free caiatog 1-800-798-6363 



COMPUTER REPAIR 



.-\r"ninKi/i:ii(i)\ti'i itk Hi-p.AiRStCM.'ns, 

l.-i41/i.i71. SXW. i:sD A. .\miga. Setting DTK-coinp 
cuniputer^. Quick .scrv iLV-.^fl day \<arr.iiny 
MOM & I'OP's Cnmpiiter Shop. I 14 N. 16lti. 
HcllKiin.' MO W-424 (8t6i 42.'>^40O 



MARKETING 



EVTEK 

Evolved Technolosic.^ n:prc.scnis proprieian compuler soft- 
wajv/hardwuri: sululiorr. lu ihc scieiniric. busint;*Si and in- 
dusiriiil L-ommiiniiy nf the North E-is(. 6fW-S59-S33.'^ 



MISCELLANEOUS 



"for the Serious CD Collector" 



^\^^\M'i^PAOR 



mM ^M^^^^^f-*^**i^sC!!^9r^^^^B I 



The only custom made cd/video 
tape storage unit of it's kind. 
Designed to match your existing 
decor and suit your storage 
needs, All of our models 
oceommodale bolh compact 
discs and video tapes in a furniture 
quality, wall-mounted unit. You 
choose the capacity size (400+ CD 
minimum), wood type, and finish. 

Now. you can turn your CD/video 
tape collection into your own 
personal library. At CD+ Interior 
Designs we use only top-quality 
solid wood and our expert 
craftsmanship produces a storage 
unit that you will be proud to display 
in your home. 

For a copy of our free brochure 

call: 1-800-234-0859 

Viso and Mastercard accepted. 



Circle Reader Service Number 360 




SKEI<ETOX HEY 



KITS MOST LOCKS 

\m»tr \om tritinl* \tih \ ]^'l I'kViok 
nttrwN-in. Vou gfl a %itni iriuiori L')v 
Me fiwk. pEvciM. iriMnH-tii.n^ 6c much 
hih H«%ic.^ j« lu bv ii^ptt liir 
pUrp«K^'jnlf' 
ifnnion ndnruntr,:.! ..r F.ill nrfund 
li'il Drinlli. 

1 (717)656-1537 

S^t HMkcMai go H. Voni£«>nfrr A\ ■«o.3G&[ RocVville Md 20850. 



Jftmr* S*m 




Affordable 14 Irt gold computer 
jewelry v^ttt micro-ctiip diamond inlay. 
Four exciting designs to ctioose from. 
Perfect for ttie computer junkie in you, or as a 
gift for one tfiat you know. It's fiardware witti a 
flare. Call 1 -SOOFUNJEWL for our free broctiure. 

con j e wgI inc 

Call 1-800-386-5395 or 1-800 FUN-JEWL 



Circle Reader Service Number 347 



POSITION WANTED 



HOME TYPISTS, 

PC tiMis needed. 

S35.n<Xl piiieniial. Details. 

Call ( 1 1 S0.5 962-KWK) Exi, B-.1(X1.1.1 



USED SOFTWARE 



USED SOFTWARE FOR SALE 

We buy & sell useC current versions of most 
I3M compatible softv/are. Not PC/Stiareware 
Completely legal Software includes ORIGINAL 
DISKETTES/MANUALS guaranteed virus free. 
Call 8am-5pm EST Mon-Fri for free price list 
RECYCLED SOFTWARE 1-800-851-2425 



Circle Reader Service Number 367 



COMPUTE Classified is a low-cost way to tell 
over 275,000 microcomputer owners about 
your product or service. 

Additional Information. Please read carefully. 

Rates: S4D per line, rrimmum of four lines Any or all of ifie 
f 's: : ie set in capital letters at no charge Aflo SIS per 
ne for tx)ld face woros. o' S50 for itie entire ad set m ooia- 
^5ce lany namper of I nesj 

Terms: Prepa/rrent is required. We accepi ctiechs. mon- 
ey orders. VISA, or MasietCard 

General Information: Aoveri-sefs using post ollce box num- 
c~- ' :'=' ads tub; supply ocrmaneni address and 
■.ac-O'-'-c nuTDer Orders vvsii not De acknowledged- Ad 
.. srjciiir m next available issue after receipl- 

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES 

C ass'fed aisp'ay ac^ ir^easure 2'U'm^e and are priced 
sccc-c ng [o ne gh; 1" = S286: 1 V?" = S430. 2" - S550 

HOW TO OflDER 

Ca '.'a-a Varasen, ClassifietJ Manager, COMPUTE. 1 

'■,'.t:3= C; Hjltngmn, NY II743. ai 516-767-9562 



CLASSIFIEDS 



SOFTWARE 



\V[TH EMISOFTS PASSWORD BYPASSER VOl 
cliniiiuiiL' annmiiiL: jiasNwoids. Disk \"uhimc 1 onI> 
534,93, or purchase scpaniicly only $3.00. Miii iij' tv\(» 
per.iriler. Call loday S13-X4l'-N7f.y. FREE S/H 

BUY/SEU. USED SOFTWARE! LOWEST FRICIi.S! 
FREE LIST. Specify 64/12S. Arnii!a or ]B\L ri;ni>ihle 
Software. PO Bo.\ 9.10. Si. Jovcpli. Ml 4'XIS.i. 
Phi.ne: (ilfi-42S-'>(Wh BBS: 6l(i-4M.721 I 

Computer Shareware/ASP Vendor 

FREE ON-DISK-CATALOr.'FREE Ufsk Offers 

Toll Fn-e Order Line • VISA/MC 

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Voice 219-46.1-5245 Fa.\ :i')-4(i.l-S4.S4 

NOT JUST SOFTWARE, ICA SOFTWARE 

inn's OF IBM AND Ili\l C'OMI'AIIKLE SOIT WAKE 
FREE CATALOG, VOK l:/FA.X S0(l-.1.11-.l(Ki5 
I'.l), BON III! I -.'04. [Rl .\1BULL. CTOftftll 



SOFTWARE 



IBM SHAREWARE 

Free catalog or S2 for sample & cata- 
log (refundable). Specify computer. 
CALOKE IND (B), Box 18477, 
Raytown, MO 64133 



■ij.^|[»iij*;i«]aiV/il:^4l 



Outstanding IBM software selected 

specially tdr Home ana Office use. 

• IDOO's of proqrams • ASP Member • 

• Lowest Prices Anywhere! • 

• Money-Back Guarantee! • 

• FREE DETAILED CATALOG • 



THE PC ARCADE 



Circle Reader Service Number 357 



FREE Update Catalog 

(800) 347-6760 FAX (209) 432-2599 



Call' FA X lor ow FREE Upoaie calaiog ol New IBM PC & compatible PD arid 

Isfiareware releases Send $2 00 ana receive ou' catalog o.i OiSh (s&eolc diW 
siiBl Ol owei 3.000 titles Jifl a c^jpan lar 2 FREE i\^% on ^Qiit nejl mail oider 
(fual flrtlyi Sef>dS9 95tof 3diskscl\hflla:K; VGAgafTKlspeafy disk sue) 

I __ BRE Software 

Ja^ 352 W BeGlord,Scilel04U, Fresno, CA 93711 
Circle Reader Service Number 261 



Circle Reader Service Number 351 



IBM - COMMODORE fi4 & 12X - AMIGA, 
IIHHJN of PD/Sliareware programs mi KKl's 
of disks. Free lisliiiu or SI for large 
ticscripiisd calaloc (specify computer). 
DISKS O'PLENTY INC.. if.l62 Pines Blvd., 
Suite 27UB. Pembroke Piile.s. FL 3.1024 




SOFTWARE 



HAVE YOU WON THE LOTTERY? 
I.— ',i\ DO YOU OWN LOTTO PICKER" 

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'lotto picker is your licKel lo Ihs 
4 " iiches' LOTTO PCKEB works by discovering 
the hidden biases in evefy lollery game world- 
'' wide Using Ihis infc lo your advantage Lotto Picker 
ml\ tell you exactly which numbers to play - no guess- work 
involved. Your Lotto Picker card will be loaded witli com- 
binations and number patterns mosi likeiy to be selected! 
Plays all Pick 3,4.6,7.10,11 Also plays games t)ased on play- 
ing cards (IvIS-DOS only). FREE telephone support with 
each purchase. For MS-DOS, Apple II, and Cfi4/12B, 
NEW LOW PRICE $29.95 (t$4 55 s/h) NY add tax. 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK! 
ORDER TODAY! 1-800-484-1 D62 S-code 0641 Or 1-7ia.317-19B1 
GE RIDGE SERVICES, INC., 
a^B Rensselaer Ave,, Dept CP 
Slalen island, NY 10309 



;^illEin=^ 



circle Reader Service Number 365 



The ONLY Lotlefy Systems With 
PROVEN JACKPOT WINNERS 
are those in Gail Howafd's 
SMART LUCK® SOFTWARE 
Call Toll-Free 1-800-876-G-A-l-L. 
(See Her Ad in Product Marl.) 




circle Reader Service Number 369 



BEST VALUE - IBM-APPLE SHAFIEWARE & PD 

CHOOSE FROM OVER 1000 DISKS. 

FREE CATALOG OR S2.00 

FOR CATALOG DEMO (SPECIFY COMPUTER) 

MCVIS ACCEPTED. NEXT DAY SHIPPING AVAILABLE 

CHRtSTELLA ENTERPRISE, P.O. BOX 32205 

ROCHESTER, Ml 48308-2205 



EDUCATION 



EDUCATION 



Circle Reader Service Number 368 

FREE! IBM PD & SHAREWARE DISK CATALOG 
Low prices since l^)S8! .^SP .Apprmed S'ciRlur. l-miu 
Software. Dept. M. Rt. 2. Bo\ 44. Roseluul, TX 76.570 
or Voicc/FAX (SI7l,3K,V21.i|. VISA/MC accepted. 



ADULT-ORIENTED SOFTWARE 

For IBM VGA, Color Mac, and Amiga. 
Check out our huge collecllon of 

X-citing Adults Only Software. 

Free lists (You nnust be over 18). 

CLEARLIGHT SOFTWARE. Dept. CO 

P,0. Box 1411, Milwaukee, Wl 53201 

(414) 962-2616 



Circte Reader Service Number 353 






CompGuard 
SENTINEL* 



SI-i.95 



***SECURITY*** 

BOOTABLE PASSWORD/SBCURm' PRCXjRAM 
Deter the nosey/raisctiievous from getting your "C^" pfonipl 
Runs Irom AUTOEXEC.BAT. Slops uniopfilsllcated users in 
their Hacks. IMS, EGAA-'G A Clietk or M O Give duik size 



GIFT IDEA! 



Custom Programming of VourPtrional Mnsaitet 

Your RTtetlng wit] dlsptay each timt pr^rtnl riuijt 

1-800-243-1168 for pricing A dttatU. 

COMPLlJiCON, 1 ItJ,"; Artior, #220, Onialia, NR «8I44 

Circle Reader Service Number 355 




How To Get 

A High-Paying 

Job In 

COMPUTER 

PROGRAMMING 



■■"■'■ JjS'^'*^ Become more 
^ ,^,ab competitive in the 

job market with EDUCATION 

Specialized Associate degree and diploma 
programs in computer programming, com- 
puter applications, systems analysis, and the 
RPG III, BASIC, COBOL, and C languages by 

DISTANCE EDUCATION 
Call or write for college catalog and booklet "How to Get 
a High-Paying Job in Computer Programming." ^ 

1-800-765-7247 = 

PEOPLES COLLEGE OF INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

233 Academy Drive • P.O. Box 421768 

Kissimmee, FL 34742-1768 

Memtjer. D L Peoples Group ■ Accredited Memtwr. NHSC 



Circle Reader Service Number 362 



In Coinputer Sciences 


■ 


C..-1: PASCAL, CDaaF.e AMERICAN 
.n -jsystars. IXSTITLTE 

COMPITER 
1 600 767 2427 SCIFN'CLS 



.11 


- Learn 
J Computers! 

^ Home study, Be- 
^^jg come a ]»rsonal com- 
j^^ ptiter exi)ert at home 
^^ and in tausiness. Free 
j^» career literature. 

800-223-4542 


.\M,lr,.5. 


fity 


.si,in- , Zip 



The School of Computer Training 

224.5 Perimeter Park 
I Dept. KMtiKO Atlanta. Cleorgia MSi\ | 

Ciri:le Reader Service Number 348 



Be a computer 
repair expert! 

Homo study. You could earn 
great mon^y troubleshooting, 
repairing, upgrading, and in- 
stalling PCs. Send or call now 
for free career literature. 

8002234542 




Nairn 

AddftU- 
City 



Circle Reader Service Number 363 



The School of PC Repair 

■>' 6065 Roswell Rd., Depr JM680 

'■■* - Ailaita. Georgia 30326 



Circle Reader Service Number 349 



NEWS BITS 



Jill Champion Booth 



Getting out of 

tlie office, tal<ing 

stock, iooliing 

at new art, and 

listening to 

wliat women 

have to say 



Just tlie Fax 

Faxes are hot items for the 
home right now — a trend 
that's seen dramatic growth in 
the past year and one that's 
likely to survive well into the fu- 
ture, according to BIS Strate- 
gic Decisions, a market re- 
search and consulting firm 
based in Norwell, Massachu- 
setts. But the reason isn't 
based on price 

"The expansion of fax into 
the home is based on need, 
not because equipment pric- 
es are declining," explains Ju- 
dith Pirani, director of BIS's Im- 
age Communication Systems 
Market Advisory Service. Busi- 
ness patterns are changing: 
More people are bringing 
work home in the evening, 
more people are telecom- 
muting, and new business 
startups from the home are 
on the increase. 

"The home is starting to 
emerge as the next important 
market segment for the fax in- 
dustry. In fact, BIS believes 
sales of home fax machines 
will eventually overtake sales 
of business fax machines," Pi- 
rani says. 

And More Facts 

Three trends cited by Barba- 
ra Gilbertson, national sales 
manager for AT&T's Profes- 
sional Development Center, 
were responsible for the organ- 
ization's whopping 39-per- 
cent increase in students dur- 
ing the first half of 1993— and 
they're likely to affect your busi- 
ness future as well. 

First, a large number of of- 
fices are changing to the Win- 
dows environment and Win- 
dows versions of software. 

Second, an increasing num- 
ber of companies are putting 
their salespeople on the road 
virtually full-time by teaching 
them to use laptop comput- 
ers to transmit orders and 
correspondence. 

And third, companies are 
continuing to reduce the num- 

178 COMPUTE NOVEMBER 1993 



ber of employees. Having few- 
er clerical employees means 
that more managers must pre- 
pare their own correspon- 
dence and their own data anal- 
yses, and that's generating a 
need for managers to learn 
more about using software. 

Ciose, but No Chagall 

But then, no one expected 
Chagall last summer when 
HSC Software of Santa fvloni- 
ca, California, held a shov/ing 
of five artists' digital art collec- 
tions at the Franklin Institute 
Science Museum's Cutting 
Edge Gallery in Philadelphia. 

Known for its unique ap- 
proach to presenting science 
and technology exhibits, the 
Franklin Institute's goal, accord- 
ing to gallery coordinator Ed- 
ward Wagner, was to show mu- 
seum visitors how the advent 
of digital technology is chang- 
ing the face of what we call 
"art" — how artists have "used 
the computer as an avenue of 
unlimited exploration into new 
art forms and styles." 

As part of the showing 
HSC installed an interactive 
presentation describing the art- 
ists' displayed work and a 
painting program for visitors 
to try. After all, the artists 
used programs like Adobe 
PhotoShop and Fractal De- 
sign Painter — affordable soft- 
ware available to everyone — 
to create their original works, 
Wagner says the digital art 
show received excellent re- 
views and "really opened a 
lot of eyes to the power of to- 
day's computer-graphics pro- 
grams." 

Not the Time to Stock Up 

It definitely wasn't a bull mar- 
ket. Milk cow was more like it 
if you sank a lot of funds into 
computer stocks this year. 

According to the July 1993 
"Software Industry Bulletin," 
published by Digital Informa- 
tion Group of Stamford, Con- 
necticut, consumers were bet- 



ter off investing in stocks oth- 
er than software for the first 
half of 1993. 

"The stock prices of 61 pub- 
licly held software companies 
rose only 3 percent during 
that time — well behind the 6.5- 
percent jump in the Dow 
Jones Industrials Average 
and the 3.6-percent rise in 
the Standard & Poor's 500 In- 
dex," the report says. 

Exceptions were compa- 
nies that went public in the 
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Girl Talk 

What's the secret of Echo, a 
New York-based online serv- 
ice that sports a 37-percent fe- 
male membership? 

According to founder Sta- 
cy Horn, in an interview with 
the Village Voice, women are 
more comfortable with the con- 
versations on Echo because 
50 percent of the conferenc- 
es are hosted by women — 
who set the tone. 

Horn says other online net- 
works designed by men turn 
women off because "women 
are not interested in the end- 
less debate that some men 
like to engage in. They com:mu- 
nicate in a way that women 
walk away from." Of course, 
men are still welcome on 
Echo, but they can't expect to 
"attend" all of the online con- 
ferences. WIT (Women In Tel- 
ecommunications) and WAC 
(Women's Action Coalition) 
are two for women only. But 
don't feel left out, guys; MOE 
(Men On Echo) is available 
for men-only conversations. 
(Horn says MOE is "dead as 
a doornail" — apparently, the 
guys are more interested in 
what the girls have to say.) 

If you're interested in regis- 
tering on Echo, log on as a riew 
user at (212) 989-8411. p 




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Circle Reader Service Number 198 



. / 



SWITCH TO SPRINT 

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Circle Header Service Number 148 



^^^^nnr-^^^g SIERRA Dynamix® 

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